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By David Holley and David Holley,Los Angeles Times | December 28, 2006
MOSCOW -- Russia and Belarus traded bitter words yesterday in a dispute over natural gas prices that threatened to damage relations between the longtime allies and disrupt supplies to other European countries. The Russian state-controlled gas monopoly Gazprom reiterated a threat to cut off natural gas for Belarus on Monday if no agreement on price is reached by then, and it accused Belarus of planning to steal gas intended for European Union states by tapping into pipelines carrying Russian gas west.
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NEWS
July 25, 2013
July 25 (Reuters) - The following bids, mergers, acquisitions and disposals were reported by 2000 GMT on Thursday: ** Dell Inc founder Michael Dell raised his $24.4 billion bid by less than 1 percent just hours before it was to be put to a vote, tacking on a controversial demand to change voting rules to make it easier for him to buy and take the No. 3 personal computer maker private. ** Publisher Axel Springer AG struck a 920-million-euro ($1.22 billion) deal to sell some of Germany's best-known newspapers and magazines, severing its oldest roots to intensify its focus on digital media.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 31, 2004
MOSCOW - A senior Russian official said yesterday that China's state oil company could be offered 20 percent of a subsidiary of the giant oil company Yukos that was confiscated and sold 11 days earlier. The offer, although conditional, could give the China National Petroleum Corp. a stake in a company that extracts 11 percent of Russia's oil, signaling deeper economic cooperation between Russia and China. But the announcement further muddied the circumstances of the auction of the subsidiary, Yuganskneftegaz, as well as the question of who will ultimately own what was once Yukos' main asset.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,Los Angeles Times | January 4, 2009
MOSCOW - Fuel delivery to four European countries fell below normal yesterday as Russia's state gas monopoly withheld natural gas from neighboring Ukraine for the third consecutive day. Ukraine warned that its gas pipeline system could experience "serious disruptions" if a worsening price dispute isn't settled in 10 to 15 days, threatening shortfalls across Europe in the heart of winter. Flows of gas to Poland, Romania, Hungary and Bulgaria, all of which depend on pipelines that cross Ukraine, decreased yesterday, officials said.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 20, 2004
MOSCOW - A company so small it didn't appear to have an office successfully bid yesterday to buy the second-biggest oil production facility in Russia for $9.3 billion, deepening the intrigue around the fate of Yukos Oil. The auction in effect guts Yukos, once the dominant Russian oil giant, which had relied on the 1 million barrels a day produced by its Yuganskneftegaz unit in Siberia for 60 percent of its output. The unit's sale at barely half its value to a little-known company, BaikalFinansGroup, leaves Yukos with little hope of maintaining solvency.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 3, 2001
MOSCOW - The vicious fight going on here over the press summons up the words of the legendary American journalist A. J. Liebling: Freedom of the press is guaranteed only to those who own one. This axiom helps explain why an investigation by Russia's chief prosecutor into the Media-MOST business empire controlled by Vladimir A. Gusinsky, one of Russia's wealthy oligarchs, has taken on doomsday proportions as far as press advocates are concerned. Gusinsky owns a newspaper and a radio station as well as a newsmagazine published in cooperation with America's Newsweek, but his prize holding is NTV, Russia's only independent national television network.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 5, 2001
MOSCOW - In the crowded offices and hallways of NTV yesterday, caffeine-jagged editors, reporters and producers waited for the inevitable moment when their foes would come and take possession. It has become something of a Russian trademark: Workers have occupied factories, and scientists have taken over their institutes until chased out by police. Eight years ago, members of parliament took over their own building, to be ousted in the end by tanks. But in the struggle by the nation's only independent television network against the new management selected by its Kremlin-associated debtholder - a struggle that they cast as one for freedom of the press - none of the sweating, exhausted, excited employees quite expected what would happen yesterday, which was nothing.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 15, 2001
MOSCOW -- The 11-day-old attempt by staffers at Russia's only national independent television company to defend their station against a hostile takeover ended early yesterday when the new management sent in guards and seized control. The new bosses said the takeover is related to debts run up by NTV, but the embattled journalists defending their station said the fight concerns freedom of the press. NTV is controlled by a team answering to Gazprom, the state-owned natural-gas monopoly that has been a reliable instrument of the Kremlin's will.
NEWS
By ED FEULNER | July 14, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Leaders of the world's freest countries will flock to an increasingly unfree nation beginning tomorrow. That's when the annual Group of Eight, or G-8, meeting draws the leaders of Britain, Italy, France, Germany, Canada, Japan and the United States to Russia. The first seven have plenty in common, including a commitment to democracy, liberty and the rule of law. It's no surprise that in the post-World War II era, these countries have built the strongest economies in the world.
NEWS
July 25, 2013
July 25 (Reuters) - The following bids, mergers, acquisitions and disposals were reported by 2000 GMT on Thursday: ** Dell Inc founder Michael Dell raised his $24.4 billion bid by less than 1 percent just hours before it was to be put to a vote, tacking on a controversial demand to change voting rules to make it easier for him to buy and take the No. 3 personal computer maker private. ** Publisher Axel Springer AG struck a 920-million-euro ($1.22 billion) deal to sell some of Germany's best-known newspapers and magazines, severing its oldest roots to intensify its focus on digital media.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,Los Angeles Times | December 28, 2006
MOSCOW -- Russia and Belarus traded bitter words yesterday in a dispute over natural gas prices that threatened to damage relations between the longtime allies and disrupt supplies to other European countries. The Russian state-controlled gas monopoly Gazprom reiterated a threat to cut off natural gas for Belarus on Monday if no agreement on price is reached by then, and it accused Belarus of planning to steal gas intended for European Union states by tapping into pipelines carrying Russian gas west.
NEWS
By ED FEULNER | July 14, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Leaders of the world's freest countries will flock to an increasingly unfree nation beginning tomorrow. That's when the annual Group of Eight, or G-8, meeting draws the leaders of Britain, Italy, France, Germany, Canada, Japan and the United States to Russia. The first seven have plenty in common, including a commitment to democracy, liberty and the rule of law. It's no surprise that in the post-World War II era, these countries have built the strongest economies in the world.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 31, 2004
MOSCOW - A senior Russian official said yesterday that China's state oil company could be offered 20 percent of a subsidiary of the giant oil company Yukos that was confiscated and sold 11 days earlier. The offer, although conditional, could give the China National Petroleum Corp. a stake in a company that extracts 11 percent of Russia's oil, signaling deeper economic cooperation between Russia and China. But the announcement further muddied the circumstances of the auction of the subsidiary, Yuganskneftegaz, as well as the question of who will ultimately own what was once Yukos' main asset.
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 20, 2004
MOSCOW - A company so small it didn't appear to have an office successfully bid yesterday to buy the second-biggest oil production facility in Russia for $9.3 billion, deepening the intrigue around the fate of Yukos Oil. The auction in effect guts Yukos, once the dominant Russian oil giant, which had relied on the 1 million barrels a day produced by its Yuganskneftegaz unit in Siberia for 60 percent of its output. The unit's sale at barely half its value to a little-known company, BaikalFinansGroup, leaves Yukos with little hope of maintaining solvency.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 1, 2001
MOSCOW - The other night, the sexually provocative movie "Last Tango in Paris," starring Marlon Brando, turned up unannounced on NTV television. A few nights later, the politically provocative and beloved satirist named Viktor Shenderovich disappeared from his 10 p.m. time slot. Before confused and frustrated NTV viewers could sort that out, they were confronted with yet another disorienting image. NTV news, known for its unflinching coverage of the misery accompanying the fighting in Chechnya, was suddenly presenting a picture of life as normal in the war-torn republic.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 15, 2001
MOSCOW -- The 11-day-old attempt by staffers at Russia's only national independent television company to defend their station against a hostile takeover ended early yesterday when the new management sent in guards and seized control. The new bosses said the takeover is related to debts run up by NTV, but the embattled journalists defending their station said the fight concerns freedom of the press. NTV is controlled by a team answering to Gazprom, the state-owned natural-gas monopoly that has been a reliable instrument of the Kremlin's will.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,Los Angeles Times | January 4, 2009
MOSCOW - Fuel delivery to four European countries fell below normal yesterday as Russia's state gas monopoly withheld natural gas from neighboring Ukraine for the third consecutive day. Ukraine warned that its gas pipeline system could experience "serious disruptions" if a worsening price dispute isn't settled in 10 to 15 days, threatening shortfalls across Europe in the heart of winter. Flows of gas to Poland, Romania, Hungary and Bulgaria, all of which depend on pipelines that cross Ukraine, decreased yesterday, officials said.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 1, 2001
MOSCOW - The other night, the sexually provocative movie "Last Tango in Paris," starring Marlon Brando, turned up unannounced on NTV television. A few nights later, the politically provocative and beloved satirist named Viktor Shenderovich disappeared from his 10 p.m. time slot. Before confused and frustrated NTV viewers could sort that out, they were confronted with yet another disorienting image. NTV news, known for its unflinching coverage of the misery accompanying the fighting in Chechnya, was suddenly presenting a picture of life as normal in the war-torn republic.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 5, 2001
MOSCOW - In the crowded offices and hallways of NTV yesterday, caffeine-jagged editors, reporters and producers waited for the inevitable moment when their foes would come and take possession. It has become something of a Russian trademark: Workers have occupied factories, and scientists have taken over their institutes until chased out by police. Eight years ago, members of parliament took over their own building, to be ousted in the end by tanks. But in the struggle by the nation's only independent television network against the new management selected by its Kremlin-associated debtholder - a struggle that they cast as one for freedom of the press - none of the sweating, exhausted, excited employees quite expected what would happen yesterday, which was nothing.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 3, 2001
MOSCOW - The vicious fight going on here over the press summons up the words of the legendary American journalist A. J. Liebling: Freedom of the press is guaranteed only to those who own one. This axiom helps explain why an investigation by Russia's chief prosecutor into the Media-MOST business empire controlled by Vladimir A. Gusinsky, one of Russia's wealthy oligarchs, has taken on doomsday proportions as far as press advocates are concerned. Gusinsky owns a newspaper and a radio station as well as a newsmagazine published in cooperation with America's Newsweek, but his prize holding is NTV, Russia's only independent national television network.
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