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NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 29, 2005
JERUSALEM - Prime Minister Ariel Sharon won a key battle yesterday against opponents of his plan to withdraw from the Gaza Strip when Israeli lawmakers overwhelmingly voted down a bill calling for a nationwide referendum on the pullout. The referendum proposal was a last-ditch legislative effort by settlers and their political allies to head off the withdrawal, set for the summer. Their efforts are likely to shift to trying to block the evacuation through civil disobedience and protest actions.
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NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | May 22, 2006
MA'ALE MICHMAS, West Bank -- Otniel Schneller, who helped establish this hilltop settlement 25 years ago, knows he won his seat in Israel's parliament without much support from his neighbors. His political ideas are nothing short of toxic here, since he supports dismantling dozens of isolated settlements in the West Bank, including, most likely, his own. But Schneller believes that his transformation from an ardent supporter of settlements to an architect for the new government's plan to abandon them is evidence that even the most committed settlers can change their views about what is best for Israel's future.
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NEWS
By Joel Greenberg and Joel Greenberg,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 30, 2004
JERUSALEM - With opinion polls indicating for the first time that his Gaza withdrawal plan would be rejected by his Likud Party, Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon scrambled yesterday to shore up support for the proposal, portraying a coming party referendum on the plan as a vote of confidence in him. In radio and newspaper interviews, Sharon predicted victory and warned that a defeat in the referendum Sunday would bring down the Likud-led government and...
NEWS
By KEN ELLINGWOOD and KEN ELLINGWOOD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 21, 2005
JERUSALEM -- Beset by dissidents in his party, Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon has decided to abandon the conservative Likud and plans to compete in early elections as head of a new party, Israeli news media reported yesterday. Asaf Shariv, Sharon's top adviser, told the Associated Press the prime minister would make a formal announcement today and ask Israeli President Moshe Katsav to dissolve the parliament, which would trigger early elections. Majalli Whbee, a Likud lawmaker who is close to Sharon, told army radio that the prime minister called him about his decision to form a new party.
NEWS
By Joel Greenberg and Joel Greenberg,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 10, 2004
JERUSALEM - Prime Minister Ariel Sharon yesterday won the backing of his Likud Party to form a coalition with the opposition Labor Party, enabling him to shore up his shaky government and pursue his plan to withdraw troops and settlers from the Gaza Strip. Sharon had warned before the party vote that a defeat of his proposal to begin talks with Labor would have led to new elections and put the Gaza withdrawal on hold. Results announced late yesterday showed that 63 percent of the voters from the 3,000-member Likud Central Committee backed talks to bring Labor and two strictly Orthodox parties into the government.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | April 15, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - When President Bush stood alongside Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon at his Crawford, Texas, ranch Monday, he spoke with the fervor of a man on a mission. Mr. Bush proclaimed he was "strongly committed to a vision of two democratic states, Israel and Palestine, living side by side in peace and security." This is clearly a theme dear to his heart. Mr. Bush invited Mr. Sharon to the ranch to bolster the Israeli leader's plan to unilaterally withdraw from the occupied Gaza Strip this summer - a move the president believes can be the first step toward Palestinian statehood.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 21, 2004
JERUSALEM - In an alliance of Israel's two most-experienced political figures, the Labor Party of Shimon Peres yesterday became almost certain to join the government led by Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and the Likud, and promised to support Sharon's plan to dismantle Jewish settlements in the Gaza Strip. Several procedural hurdles remain before a new coalition officially comes into being, but the new Cabinet could be announced this week. Labor's entry into the government would save Sharon from having to call early national elections and give him a far better chance of carrying out his plan to withdraw Israeli forces from Gaza and dismantle settlements there.
NEWS
February 27, 2005
WHEN JEWS settled the Gaza Strip, Ariel Sharon stood with them. When they built their first greenhouses, planted their first fields, he was there. He welcomed the first generation of Israelis born there and defended their homes against terrorist attacks. And he is the prime minister who has engineered their removal from that disputed land. In recalling his 60 years of service to the state of Israel, Mr. Sharon said last week no decision had been more difficult than this. But difficulties await him still.
NEWS
August 29, 2005
THE BILLIONS in U.S. aid bestowed on Israel in the past decade have carried a caveat - none of the money could be used in the Palestinian territories captured by Israel during the 1967 war. That legal impediment should hold in any request for additional U.S. aid to help offset Israel's cost of evacuating 21 settlements in the Gaza Strip and four in a remote corner of the West Bank. The estimated $2 billion cost of removing settlers and demolishing their homes has been borne by the Israeli government.
NEWS
October 8, 2004
ISRAEL'S PLAN to unilaterally withdraw troops and settlers from the Gaza Strip has been unmasked as a subterfuge. Now if only the Bush administration would acknowledge what skeptics (this newspaper included) have recognized from the start: that Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's disengagement plan would delay, not facilitate, a negotiated settlement of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. In the interim, the Israeli army is systematically killing Palestinian militants, disrupting their reign of terror but also leaving a trail of destruction and death in Gaza refugee camps.
NEWS
August 29, 2005
THE BILLIONS in U.S. aid bestowed on Israel in the past decade have carried a caveat - none of the money could be used in the Palestinian territories captured by Israel during the 1967 war. That legal impediment should hold in any request for additional U.S. aid to help offset Israel's cost of evacuating 21 settlements in the Gaza Strip and four in a remote corner of the West Bank. The estimated $2 billion cost of removing settlers and demolishing their homes has been borne by the Israeli government.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | August 26, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - The air of unreality about U.S. policy toward the Israeli pullout from Gaza reminds me of the wishful thinking that preceded the Iraq war. President Bush has banked his hopes on the following scenario: Now that Israeli settlers and troops are out of Gaza, Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas can transform that sand spit into an economic showcase. He must also end terror and create a mini-democracy there. International donors will provide funds to cut the 60 percent unemployment rate among Gaza's 1.3 million people.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 18, 2005
MORAG, Gaza Strip - Israeli soldiers and police moved swiftly from door to door yesterday in Jewish settlements in the Gaza Strip, asking settlers to leave and in many cases then dragging them out of their homes, from rooftops and out of barricaded synagogues. The plan for a complete Israeli withdrawal from Gaza after an 18-year occupation appeared to be moving faster and more smoothly than the government anticipated, and officials spoke of emptying the last of Gaza's 21 settlements before the end of next week.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 14, 2005
JERUSALEM - Early tomorrow, thousands of Israeli soldiers and police will enter the Gaza Strip's Jewish settlements and knock on the doors of residents, giving them a final warning to leave their homes within 48 hours or be evicted by force. And so will begin, after months of intense debate and national turmoil, Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's withdrawal of all 8,500 settlers from the Gaza Strip plus 500 others living in four settlements in the West Bank. But even before soldiers approach the first settler, Israelis and Palestinians are looking beyond the drama unfolding in Gaza to a larger issue: After the withdrawal from Gaza, what comes next for Israel and the Palestinians?
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 4, 2005
JERUSALEM - Israel's Cabinet soundly defeated an attempt yesterday to delay the planned withdrawal from the Gaza Strip by three months. The 18-3 decision was the first of two planned votes this week on proposals to postpone the pullout, scheduled to start next month. The parliament, or Knesset, is expected to defeat Wednesday a separate measure seeking a delay. The proposals stoked fresh tensions between Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and his main political foe, Finance Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who joined two other rightist ministers yesterday in backing the proposed delay.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | April 15, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - When President Bush stood alongside Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon at his Crawford, Texas, ranch Monday, he spoke with the fervor of a man on a mission. Mr. Bush proclaimed he was "strongly committed to a vision of two democratic states, Israel and Palestine, living side by side in peace and security." This is clearly a theme dear to his heart. Mr. Bush invited Mr. Sharon to the ranch to bolster the Israeli leader's plan to unilaterally withdraw from the occupied Gaza Strip this summer - a move the president believes can be the first step toward Palestinian statehood.
NEWS
By KEN ELLINGWOOD and KEN ELLINGWOOD,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 21, 2005
JERUSALEM -- Beset by dissidents in his party, Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon has decided to abandon the conservative Likud and plans to compete in early elections as head of a new party, Israeli news media reported yesterday. Asaf Shariv, Sharon's top adviser, told the Associated Press the prime minister would make a formal announcement today and ask Israeli President Moshe Katsav to dissolve the parliament, which would trigger early elections. Majalli Whbee, a Likud lawmaker who is close to Sharon, told army radio that the prime minister called him about his decision to form a new party.
NEWS
December 5, 2004
THE IMPROVED prospect of Middle East peace is playing havoc with the politics of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The leading candidate to succeed Yasser Arafat, former Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas, is facing a challenge from an imprisoned popular leader of younger Palestinian activists. Marwan Barghouti's last-minute bid for the presidency of the Palestinian Authority threatens the united front presented just days ago by members of the main Palestinian faction who chose Mr. Abbas as their presidential candidate.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 29, 2005
JERUSALEM - Prime Minister Ariel Sharon won a key battle yesterday against opponents of his plan to withdraw from the Gaza Strip when Israeli lawmakers overwhelmingly voted down a bill calling for a nationwide referendum on the pullout. The referendum proposal was a last-ditch legislative effort by settlers and their political allies to head off the withdrawal, set for the summer. Their efforts are likely to shift to trying to block the evacuation through civil disobedience and protest actions.
NEWS
February 27, 2005
WHEN JEWS settled the Gaza Strip, Ariel Sharon stood with them. When they built their first greenhouses, planted their first fields, he was there. He welcomed the first generation of Israelis born there and defended their homes against terrorist attacks. And he is the prime minister who has engineered their removal from that disputed land. In recalling his 60 years of service to the state of Israel, Mr. Sharon said last week no decision had been more difficult than this. But difficulties await him still.
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