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NEWS
April 3, 1998
THE 1968 riots rank with the 1904 fire that wiped out much of the downtown business district and the state legislature's 1947 vote to prevent the city from annexing additional land as major events that changed the course of history for Baltimore this century.In the early hours, the unrest didn't seem like a momentous event. The city was relatively quiet after the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in Memphis on the evening of #F Thursday, April 4. But by April 6, sporadic, isolated incidents had gained momentum.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2013
A new urban park is bringing a patch of green to a once-blighted corner of Broadway East, a project organizers hope can be a model for improving the quality of life and reducing pollution in other distressed Baltimore neighborhoods. Trees are to be planted today at the corner of Gay and Federal streets, on a third of an acre where until a few years ago 18 mostly dilapidated rowhouses had stood. Community and nonprofit leaders, elected officials and others who live, worship and work in the area are expected to be on hand to help with landscaping the New Broadway East Community Park.
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FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | March 19, 2001
It's easy to find moral reasons to object to the O'Malley administration's plan to lease a city-owned property near the Inner Harbor to the El Dorado Lounge strip club. The city shouldn't be the landlord for such a business. But even if the proposed tenant were the most reputable enterprise around, there is a basic flaw with the idea of the city relinquishing control of the former Baltimore International College property at 19-21 S. Gay St. Used for many years as the headquarters and teaching restaurant for a culinary college that outgrew the location, the now-vacant property is one of the most valuable development parcels the city owns.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | March 1, 2013
Mortician Erich March told me he was tired of seeing people in his East Baltimore community die of conditions like diabetes and hypertension. He blamed the lack of grocery shopping choices in the neighborhood where he grew up and where his Aisquith Street funeral home is located. He and his wife, Michele Speaks-March, were determined to bring a new style of shopping to the Oliver, South Clifton and Darley Park neighborhoods. They were not targeting the vegan or food faddist crowd.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1998
It is one of those architectural oddities that lend the Baltimore skyline more than a little distinction, while at the same time arousing the curiosity of those who appreciate offbeat buildings.Standing on a hill in the 1700 block of North Gay Street, the abandoned American Brewery rises up from the street, a massive red brick structure grown dingy and weary with age, its pagoda-like tower visible for miles.Placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973, the former brewery has served as a backdrop for movies and this season even figured in an episode of "Homicide."
NEWS
June 13, 2004
On June 11, 2004, MARTHA NOINETTE HIHN (nee Diehl) age 81, beloved wife of the late John B. Hihn Jr., dear sister of the late Fred Diehl. Also survived by many friends. Memorial service will be held at later date. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Grace & Hope Mission, 4 S. Gay Street, Baltimore, MD, 21202.
NEWS
November 29, 2000
A TWO-YEAR restoration effort was recently completed at the 150-year-old African-American Ellsworth Cemetery near Westminster in Carroll County. Unknown to most of those who were doing the restoring, the remains of Laurel Cemetery, Baltimore's famous African-American burial ground, also lie within their county. During the first half of the 19th century, the majority of Baltimore's black population was buried in "colored burial grounds" owned by local churches. Many of the burial sites were near Gay Street, between Chase and Lanvale streets.
NEWS
May 1, 2003
Pratt Street traffic slowed by 2 construction projects Eastbound traffic on Pratt Street leaving the Inner Harbor will be slower than usual through Tuesday, with lane closings necessitated by two continuing construction projects, and use of alternate routes is suggested by the city Department of Transportation. The Pratt Street lane closures are scheduled from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. through tomorrow between Gay Street and Market Place for work on the Market Place Streetscape project. Lane closures will take place during the same hours through Tuesday from President Street to Central Avenue for the Flaghouse Courts development project, the department said.
NEWS
September 8, 2005
On September 5, 2005 JULIAN I. FORREST JR.; loving husband of Sue A. Forrest (nee Shover); dear son of the late Julian I. Sr. and Myrtle (nee Gabriel) Forrest; brother of the late William J. Forrest, John D. Forrest, C. Beverly Schwamb; brother-in-law of Ruth Colliver. A Graveside Service will be held in the Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens on Thursday, September 8, at 11 A.M. Please omit flowers and contributions may be made in Julian's name to Box 414 Association Inc., 414 N. Gay Street, Baltimore, MD 21202.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | November 5, 1995
From The Sun Nov. 5-11, 1845* Nov. 7: A correspondent suggests that, in view of the increase of travel in Gay Street, the proper authorities should order the removal of furniture wagons from Gay Street, between Baltimore and Fayette streets, and give them a stand somewhere else.* Nov. 8: We regret to hear that apprehensions exist that the Baltimore pilot boat Fell's Point has been lost with all on board, some six or eight in number.From The Sun Nov. 5-11, 1895* Nov. 5: About five thousand persons witnessed the unveiling yesterday in Bonnie Brae Cemetery of the monument erected by the congregation of St. Mary Star of the Sea Catholic Church to the memory of its late pastor and founder, Rev. Peter McCoy.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2012
A male was shot in the leg Saturday on N. Gay Street, Baltimore police said. The shooting occurred in the 1000 block of N. Gay St. The victim was transported to an area hospital. No further information was immediately available. Police had earlier believed the shooting occurred in the 1800 block of Orleans St. ywenger@baltsun.com twitter.com/yvonnewenger
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2012
Abram, his wife, Bessie, and his teenage brother Sam came first, traveling by train from their Russian village to a German port a thousand miles away in 1912. Then they boarded the ship that would bring them to their new home - Baltimore. The brothers, tailors by trade, mailed packages back to their densely wooded village - coats with bills sewn into the linings, shoes with coins hammered into the soles - to help their siblings and parents pay for the voyage. After 14 years, all eight siblings and their parents - Chaim and Suhra - were reunited in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
A year ago Saturday, Evelyn Scott-Palmer returned home from picking up her lunch to find her husband lying unresponsive on the cellar floor. Sterling Palmer, 78, had suffered multiple stab wounds. He died that day, and family members say they have not been able to find closure because his murder remains unsolved. "I miss him," Scott-Palmer said. "He was my best friend. " Now family and friends are hoping the offer of a $4,000 reward will draw new attention to the case and yield tips that could help find the killer.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | March 25, 2011
It was the first Saturday in April 1968. I stood alongside family members and looked out the windows from our home. No ordinary fire was burning in East Baltimore. It was the first night of the rioting that broke out two days after the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. The flames seemed out of control and shot far into the air. The next day, Palm Sunday, plumes of smoke crossed the skies. A few days ago, I received an advance copy of what promises to be the definitive history of that incident.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2010
The doors of the Grace and Hope Mission open five evenings a week. Most nights, depending on the time of the month, about 40 to 60 people will step in from Gay Street, just south of The Block in Baltimore, for a religious service and a free meal. "But my God shall supply all your need according to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus," said Helen Meewes, the mission's superintendent, quoting from the Book of Philippians. Meewes is one of three missionaries, including Karen Harp and Gunhild Carlson, who reside upstairs and staff one of Baltimore's oldest nondenominational, charitable institutions.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | September 20, 2009
I had hoped that a video of a juvenile court hearing would help explain how a teenager with a long criminal record who had just been arrested in a drug bust could be sent home from a detention center only to be charged with killing a man two hours later in the front seat of a Buick Park Avenue. Unfortunately, what I saw not only fails to explain why state officials freed 17-year-old Maurice Brown, but it raises new questions about the case, while revealing proposed procedural changes that would make it easier for more young offenders to avoid detention.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | December 24, 1993
In its 81st and final year in the menswear business, Sam Glass & Son Inc. is showing its age.The racks that once drew shoppers from around the city to the 4,000-square-foot Gay Street store are plastered with going-out-of-business signs. One in particular drives home the message that this is Sam Glass' swan song:"All Sales Final," it says. "No checks . . . No refunds . . . No returns . . . No exchanges . . . No store credits . . . No charge credits . . . No layaways."The liquidation sale has been going on for several weeks now -- it's expected to last until February.
NEWS
August 12, 1992
Thelma Taylor, who had been a hairdresser and then an aide to the sick and elderly, died Sunday of a respiratory illness at the Good Samaritan Hospital.Services for Ms. Taylor, who was 74 and lived in the Waters Towers Apartments, will be held at 11:30 a.m. today at Waters A.M.E. Church, 417 Aisquith St.She retired about 10 years ago after working for the Baltimore City Health Department helping the sick and elderly at their homes for about three years. Earlier, she owned Thelma's Beauty Salon on Gay Street.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | August 27, 2009
The long-planned revitalization of the area surrounding Oldtown Mall in East Baltimore inched forward Wednesday, as city officials approved funds to help relocate merchants and make way for mixed-use development. The Board of Estimates, the city's spending panel, approved more than $256,000 in moving expenses for seven small shops or businesses, among them a hair salon, a car wash and a tailor's shop, that occupy buildings the city has acquired. The city has been buying up property around the mall south of Monument Street at Orleans and Ensor streets as part of a deal to turn over a 5-acre parcel to a development group led by Continental Realty Corp.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | April 4, 2008
Walking up Gay Street - past burning storefronts, past looters carrying suitcases through the broken display window of a pawn shop, and past Baltimore police cars racing by on their way from one riot call to another - I could hardly take it all in. That Monday after the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s murder was chaos in East Baltimore, where I struggled as a raw, 23-year-old police reporter for the News American to gather information. Strangely, none of the looters gave me a second glance, and I was calm and unafraid.
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