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By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2003
With conservative congregations threatening rebellion, the American Episcopal Church is expected Monday to confirm the election of the first openly gay bishop in the worldwide Anglican Communion. Christians across the nation will be watching the Episcopal national convention in Minneapolis this weekend to see how it grapples with the issue of homosexuality, one of the most challenging and contentious issues in American religious life. If, as expected, the convention confirms the Rev. Canon V. Gene Robinson - an openly gay man who was recently elected bishop of New Hampshire - parishes from Texas to Buenos Aires are warning of a major realignment in the 75 million-member Anglican Communion, of which the Episcopal Church is the U.S. branch.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
The Maryland priest at the center of a seismic tumult in the worldwide international Anglican Communion is slim and stands just over 5 feet, wears her gray hair cut short and greets visitors with a strong two-handed grasp. She's known to former parishioners and colleagues for emotional and insightful sermons, administrative skill, high energy — and for occasionally wearing a giant foam wedge of cheese on her head to honor her favorite NFL team. The Rev. Canon Mary Douglas Glasspool, due to be consecrated today as bishop in the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles, is known to the rest of the world by a phrase that would fit on a bumper sticker: "first openly lesbian bishop."
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NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2004
An Anglican Communion panel in London rebuked the Episcopal Church yesterday for approving its first gay bishop, but the Episcopal leadership showed no sign of retreat in a simmering dispute that has threatened to split the global church. The report, issued by an advisory commission of the worldwide Anglican Communion, called for the Episcopal Church to express regret for consecrating Bishop V. Gene Robinson, who leads the Diocese of New Hampshire, and place a moratorium on similar promotions.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2004
An Anglican Communion panel in London rebuked the Episcopal Church yesterday for approving its first gay bishop, but the Episcopal leadership showed no sign of retreat in a simmering dispute that has threatened to split the global church. The report, issued by an advisory commission of the worldwide Anglican Communion, called for the Episcopal Church to express regret for consecrating Bishop V. Gene Robinson, who leads the Diocese of New Hampshire, and place a moratorium on similar promotions.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2003
MINNEAPOLIS - Despite warnings of a split by tradition-minded congregations around the globe, the American Episcopal Church took a major step yesterday toward confirming the first openly gay bishop in the worldwide Anglican Communion. By a healthy margin, the House of Deputies at the church's national convention ratified the election of the Rev. V. Gene Robinson as the bishop of New Hampshire. The matter now goes to the church's House of Bishops, which is expected to make a final decision on Robinson's confirmation today.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2003
MINNEAPOLIS - As they battled over confirmation of the nation's first openly gay elected bishop - and wrestled with charges that he had engaged in sexual misconduct - a subtle subtext emerged in the public comments of some Episcopal clergy last week: We handle these issues differently than the Roman Catholic Church. With an international audience watching their triennial convention, they seized a rare moment in the spotlight to send a message - that their church is open to gays, is willing to discuss its problems frankly, and takes charges of sexual misconduct against its priests seriously.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2003
MINNEAPOLIS - In a move that threatens to split the Anglican Communion, the Episcopal Church cleared the Rev. Canon V. Gene Robinson of last-minute allegations of sexual misconduct and confirmed him yesterday as the first openly gay bishop elected in America. By a 62-43 vote, the church's House of Bishops approved Robinson's election as bishop of New Hampshire, ensuring that he will become the highest-ranking openly gay clergy member in the United States. Robinson's confirmation, after an emotional debate on homosexuality and faith and two topsy-turvy days of suspense, served as a powerful symbol of the church's acceptance of gay men and lesbians.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
MINNEAPOLIS - By all accounts, the Rev. V. Gene Robinson, who might become the first openly gay bishop in the American Episcopal Church tomorrow, is a hard man to dislike. With his thinning blond hair, clerical collar and glasses, the 56-year-old Robinson looks every bit the avuncular New England preacher his friends describe. Wearing buttons that read "Ask Me About Gene," his supporters here at the Episcopal Church's national convention say Robinson is a warm man who is as adept at navigating diocesan politics as he is at counseling parishioners.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 17, 2003
LONDON - Anglican leaders expressed deep regret yesterday over U.S. Episcopalians' appointment of their first openly gay bishop, emphasizing that his coming consecration put "in jeopardy" the future of the global community. In a unanimous statement that included a strongly worded rebuke to the U.S. Episcopal Church, the 37 leaders said the consecration would "tear the fabric of our communion at its deepest level." It also "may lead to further division on this and further issues as provinces have to decide in consequence whether they can remain in communion with provinces that choose not to break communion with the Episcopal Church," said the statement, issued at the end of a two-day emergency summit.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 8, 2003
CONCORD, N.H. - Episcopalians in the diocese of New Hampshire elected yesterday as their leader the first openly gay bishop anywhere in the worldwide Anglican Communion, a step likely to roil the church in America and England and deepen the disaffection of the more conservative Anglican churches in Africa, Asia and Latin America. The bishop-elect, the Rev. Canon V. Gene Robinson, who had developed a loyal following here for his work as assistant to the current bishop, was elected from among four candidates on the second round of balloting at St. Paul's Church.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2004
VERO BEACH, Fla. - Rick Lindsey left a short, but telling phone message last fall for his longtime friend and fellow Episcopal priest, Lorne Coyle. "Are we OK?" he asked. Coyle and Lindsey met as seminary students in the 1970s, and they're godfathers to each other's children. But they hadn't spoken in months. The reason: The Episcopal Church had confirmed the election of its first openly gay bishop. Coyle, an evangelical who interprets Scripture strictly, was against the move, while Lindsey, a social and theological liberal, called it progress.
TOPIC
By Llewellyn King and Llewellyn King,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 30, 2003
By reading the great journals of opinion, it is hard not to believe that the Anglican Communion, known in the United States as the Episcopal Church and in Britain as the Church of England, is in tatters. The Nigerian Church, we are advised, is set to break away, as might Episcopal congregations in Pennsylvania and Texas. The cause of the controversy is the consecration of an openly gay Episcopal bishop, Gene Robinson, in New Hampshire. Conservative commentators, such as George Will, have argued that if the church does not hold to biblical writ and doctrinal law, it will implode.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2003
After nearly 27 years as a parishioner, Bill Meisheid left St. Timothy's Episcopal Church yesterday. Before Communion, he stood up in the Catonsville church and asked Maryland's Suffragan Bishop John L. Rabb, who was visiting, if he rejected the recent consecration of a gay man to serve as a bishop in the Episcopal Church. Rabb said he did not and soon afterward, Meisheid walked out. Then he drove a couple of miles to worship at a gymnasium with dozens of former St. Timothy's members who had left the parish and the Episcopal Church in protest earlier this fall.
NEWS
By Larry B. Stammer and Larry B. Stammer,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 3, 2003
DURHAM, N.H. -- The Rt. Rev. V. Gene Robinson, an openly gay priest, was consecrated yesterday as Episcopal bishop of New Hampshire -- a break with 2,000 years of Christian tradition that could split the worldwide Anglican Communion. Robinson's elevation to one of the highest offices within the Episcopal Church has been hailed by supporters as a breakthrough for the inclusion of gays and lesbians, and decried by opponents as a foretaste of heresy and division. It has become the focus of an international theological struggle in which sharply opposing views on homosexuality and differing interpretations of scripture have pushed the church to the edge of schism.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 17, 2003
LONDON - Anglican leaders expressed deep regret yesterday over U.S. Episcopalians' appointment of their first openly gay bishop, emphasizing that his coming consecration put "in jeopardy" the future of the global community. In a unanimous statement that included a strongly worded rebuke to the U.S. Episcopal Church, the 37 leaders said the consecration would "tear the fabric of our communion at its deepest level." It also "may lead to further division on this and further issues as provinces have to decide in consequence whether they can remain in communion with provinces that choose not to break communion with the Episcopal Church," said the statement, issued at the end of a two-day emergency summit.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2003
In one of the most tangible pieces of fallout from the Episcopal Church's confirmation of its first openly gay elected bishop, the rector of St. Timothy's Church in Catonsville is resigning and says he expects to take much of his congregation with him. The Rev. Steven R. Randall, who announced this month that the parish would withhold its $5,000 monthly dues from the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland in protest, said he could no longer submit to the authority...
TOPIC
By Llewellyn King and Llewellyn King,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 30, 2003
By reading the great journals of opinion, it is hard not to believe that the Anglican Communion, known in the United States as the Episcopal Church and in Britain as the Church of England, is in tatters. The Nigerian Church, we are advised, is set to break away, as might Episcopal congregations in Pennsylvania and Texas. The cause of the controversy is the consecration of an openly gay Episcopal bishop, Gene Robinson, in New Hampshire. Conservative commentators, such as George Will, have argued that if the church does not hold to biblical writ and doctrinal law, it will implode.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2003
In one of the most tangible pieces of fallout from the Episcopal Church's confirmation of its first openly gay elected bishop, the rector of St. Timothy's Church in Catonsville is resigning and says he expects to take much of his congregation with him. The Rev. Steven R. Randall, who announced this month that the parish would withhold its $5,000 monthly dues from the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland in protest, said he could no longer submit to the authority...
TOPIC
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2003
WHEN THE Episcopal Church confirmed the election of its first openly gay bishop this month, it exposed a cultural and spiritual chasm between the faithful in America and millions of their brethren in the developing world. To many Episcopalians, the confirmation of the Rev. Canon V. Gene Robinson, an openly gay man, was a welcome sign of the church's acceptance of homosexuals. But many in the worldwide Anglican Communion - of which the Episcopal Church is the U.S. branch - were horrified.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 9, 2003
LONDON - The archbishop of Canterbury, spiritual leader of the world's 79 million Anglican Christians, said yesterday that he would convene an extraordinary meeting of church leaders here to avert a schism over the confirmation of an openly gay bishop in the Episcopal Church in the United States. The archbishop, Rowan Williams, regarded as first among equals in the Anglican Church, said the meeting would be held in October. "I am clear that the anxieties caused by recent developments have reached the point where we will need to sit down and discuss their consequences," he said in a statement.
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