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NEWS
January 22, 1995
The 99,400 people who visited the Walters Art Gallery to see "Gauguin and the School of Pont-Aven" made the two-month-long exhibition, which closed last weekend, one of the most popular in the museum's history. Only the 1993 retrospective of Impressionist master Alfred Sisley drew more patrons -- and the Sisley show ran a month longer.The Walters is trying to reach out to a wider audience, not only locally but nationally. The chance to put on a show as beautiful as the Gauguin exhibition was a perfect opportunity to move toward that goal.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  SCHMUTZ English, a bastard language, is also a promiscuous one. The offspring of Germanic Anglo-Saxon and Norman French has helped itself to borrowings from a fellow bastard language, Yiddish, the offspring of German, Hebrew, Aramaic, and others.  English has been particularly receptive to earthy terms from Yiddish, including this week's featured word  schmutz  (pronounced SHMUTS, with a u as in put )
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey | December 2, 1994
Last week, the Walters Art Gallery recorded its highest weekly attendance, with 11,500 paid admissions. A daily record high was set last Friday, with 4,200 attendance.The record crowds are flocking to "Gauguin and the School of Pont-Aven," a show of more than 100 works by Paul Gauguin and others who worked in the small Brittany town of Pont-Aven in the 1880s.The show, which deals with a period when art was moving past impressionism and toward the art of the 20th century, continues through Jan. 15 at the Walters, its only East Coast venue.
NEWS
November 25, 2013
BUCHAREST - The leader of a Romanian gang that stole paintings from a Dutch museum in one of the world's biggest art heists could be sentenced this week to up to 18 years in prison, according to a statement by his lawyer Tuesday. Radu Dogaru's sentencing is among upcoming events this week that also include likely testimony by fascist leaders in Greece, the release of new housing indicators in the United States and the premiere of a new film featuring former  Wire  star Idris Elba.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 17, 1995
"Gauguin and the School of Pont-Aven," the blockbuster exhibit that closed Sunday at the Walters Art Gallery, drew huge crowds that made it the second-biggest show in the museum's history.The exhibit brought 99,400 people to the museum during its two-month run, a figure second only to "Sisley," paintings by French impressionist Alfred Sisley, in the spring of 1993. That show, which ran for three months, drew 134,000 visitors.The Gauguin exhibit also set two attendance records for the Walters -- a daily average of 2,100 people and a final-week attendance of 17,400.
NEWS
By Colleen M. Webster | January 27, 1995
She was speakingas the car swerved by lit developmentswhere families ate through Jeopardyand yawned through Beverly Hills 90210.''You know, about Gauguin, his colorswere never the same after Martiniqueand Panama with Charles Laval.Still, he had his son, Emile,with him in Paris, the other fourwith his wife in her home, Holland.It was mainly the brush strokesthat Gauguin changed, VanGogh andhe not agreeing right up tothe night Vincent cut off his ear.Yes, Gauguin was there, the twoof them fighting across theArles countryside and absinthesinstead of dinner when theycould afford only one or the other.
NEWS
By BENNARD B. PERLMAN | November 30, 1994
When Paul Gauguin arrived in Pont-Aven in June, 1886, he was sufficiently impressed with the village to write to his wife: ''What a shame we didn't come to Brittany before. . . . If I can gradually find a steady market for my paintings, I'll stay here all the year around.'' Before long the fledgling artist, already 38 years old, reported from this outpost in the northwest corner of France that ''I'm respected as the best painter in Pont-Aven.''As revealed in the Walters Art Gallery's stunning exhibition, ''Gauguin & the Pont-Aven School,'' this former sailor-stockbroker-banker-canvas salesman was able, while residing in the town, to fashion a style and a following which helped alter the course of Modern European Art.The first painters who began arriving in Pont-Aven about 1850 specialized in realistic renderings of nature, followed by the Impressionists.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith M. Redding and Judith M. Redding,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 2003
The Way to Paradise, by Mario Vargas Llosa. Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 384 pages. $25. Mario Vargas Llosa's historical novel, The Way to Paradise, takes its title from a children's game, much like hide and seek, in which one child asks the other players, "Is this the way to Paradise?" The response is always "try the next corner;" but as the child runs to the next corner, the others reconfigure themselves so that "paradise" can never be found. In this fluid melding of Vargas Llosa's usual biting socio-political commentary with actual history, he metaphorizes the concept of an elusive Paradise through the novel's main characters, French social reformer and feminist Flora Tristan and her grandson, painter Paul Gauguin.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 18, 2006
If Vincent van Gogh were alive today, he'd probably be in and out of treatment centers, on talk shows and magazine covers, a media darling and bad boy. The Dutch artist's tempestuous life has been a continuing source of fascination for writers. Steven Dietz's Inventing van Gogh, currently at Mobtown Players, is the third play I've seen about the troubled 19th-century artist, who only sold two paintings during his lifetime. The first play was an experimental piece; the second a musical.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1998
At the end of the 19th century, French painter Paul Gauguin sailed to tropical Tahiti to escape corrupting civilization -- only to find that it had already beaten him there.Inspired by Gauguin's sun-drenched canvases, Jamaican painter Gilda Sharpe Etteh arrived in America a century later and began creating pictures that transformed drab modernity into a riotous carnival of Caribbean color.The work that emerged could be described as the fruit of a century-long confrontation between European primitivism and African-American modernism.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 18, 2006
If Vincent van Gogh were alive today, he'd probably be in and out of treatment centers, on talk shows and magazine covers, a media darling and bad boy. The Dutch artist's tempestuous life has been a continuing source of fascination for writers. Steven Dietz's Inventing van Gogh, currently at Mobtown Players, is the third play I've seen about the troubled 19th-century artist, who only sold two paintings during his lifetime. The first play was an experimental piece; the second a musical.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith M. Redding and Judith M. Redding,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 2003
The Way to Paradise, by Mario Vargas Llosa. Farrar, Straus & Giroux. 384 pages. $25. Mario Vargas Llosa's historical novel, The Way to Paradise, takes its title from a children's game, much like hide and seek, in which one child asks the other players, "Is this the way to Paradise?" The response is always "try the next corner;" but as the child runs to the next corner, the others reconfigure themselves so that "paradise" can never be found. In this fluid melding of Vargas Llosa's usual biting socio-political commentary with actual history, he metaphorizes the concept of an elusive Paradise through the novel's main characters, French social reformer and feminist Flora Tristan and her grandson, painter Paul Gauguin.
NEWS
By Holland Cotter and Holland Cotter,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 21, 2002
NEW YORK - Paul Gauguin (1848-1903) liked attention. He wore funny clothes, said shocking things, painted gorgeous pictures and traveled halfway around the world to get it. His efforts paid off. When he died of syphilis at 54 on an island in the South Pacific, people around the world took notice, and they have been noticing him ever since. So it's surprising to learn that "Gauguin in New York Collections: The Lure of the Exotic," at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, is the first major New York-area exhibition devoted to him in more than 40 years.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1998
At the end of the 19th century, French painter Paul Gauguin sailed to tropical Tahiti to escape corrupting civilization -- only to find that it had already beaten him there.Inspired by Gauguin's sun-drenched canvases, Jamaican painter Gilda Sharpe Etteh arrived in America a century later and began creating pictures that transformed drab modernity into a riotous carnival of Caribbean color.The work that emerged could be described as the fruit of a century-long confrontation between European primitivism and African-American modernism.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1997
Gertrude Stein is scowling. The nudes are reclining. And all is right with the world, as far as the Baltimore Museum of Art is concerned.The museum yesterday celebrated the return of its signature exhibit from a half-world away with an afternoon's worth of free activities, drawing hundreds of newcomers and old friends to see late 19th century and early 20th century works well-known to most Baltimore art lovers."
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1996
An exhibition of the Baltimore Museum of Art's renowned Cone Collection will travel overseas for the first time this fall -- when the museum sends to Japan a selection of works including 65 paintings, sculptures and drawings by Henri Matisse, the museum announced yesterday."
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  SCHMUTZ English, a bastard language, is also a promiscuous one. The offspring of Germanic Anglo-Saxon and Norman French has helped itself to borrowings from a fellow bastard language, Yiddish, the offspring of German, Hebrew, Aramaic, and others.  English has been particularly receptive to earthy terms from Yiddish, including this week's featured word  schmutz  (pronounced SHMUTS, with a u as in put )
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 31, 1993
Toward the end of the exhibit of the William S. Paley Collection, opening at the Baltimore Museum of Art today, you can sit down facing a wall of three large paintings by major American abstract artists: Josef Albers' "Homage to the Square in Green Frame" (1963), Morris Louis' "Number 4-31" (1962) and Kenneth Noland's "Sounds in the Summer Night" (1962).These are far from the core of the Paley collection, for its core lies in the earlier modernism of about 1875 to 1925. But the Albers, Louis and Noland paintings echo a theme sounded throughout this exhibit.
NEWS
By Colleen M. Webster | January 27, 1995
She was speakingas the car swerved by lit developmentswhere families ate through Jeopardyand yawned through Beverly Hills 90210.''You know, about Gauguin, his colorswere never the same after Martiniqueand Panama with Charles Laval.Still, he had his son, Emile,with him in Paris, the other fourwith his wife in her home, Holland.It was mainly the brush strokesthat Gauguin changed, VanGogh andhe not agreeing right up tothe night Vincent cut off his ear.Yes, Gauguin was there, the twoof them fighting across theArles countryside and absinthesinstead of dinner when theycould afford only one or the other.
NEWS
January 22, 1995
The 99,400 people who visited the Walters Art Gallery to see "Gauguin and the School of Pont-Aven" made the two-month-long exhibition, which closed last weekend, one of the most popular in the museum's history. Only the 1993 retrospective of Impressionist master Alfred Sisley drew more patrons -- and the Sisley show ran a month longer.The Walters is trying to reach out to a wider audience, not only locally but nationally. The chance to put on a show as beautiful as the Gauguin exhibition was a perfect opportunity to move toward that goal.
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