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By Larry Carson and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 14, 2010
A Clarksville couple with deep connections in the development community is negotiating to buy the former Gateway School building on Route 108 and redevelop the lot. George and Holly Stone were chosen from among six finalists to redevelop the site, where a county-owned 7.8 acre complex of former school buildings just across the road from the River Hill Village Center is now being demolished. Holly Stone is a vice president of Percontee Inc., a Silver Spring building materials and quarry firm owned by the family of the late Homer Gudelsky, a prominent Washington developer who was her father.
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NEWS
By Kate Hollander | February 25, 2014
When my daughter was diagnosed with autism four years ago, our family was determined to make sure she received the right education, one that would meet her needs and give her a chance to fulfill her potential. We never imagined how hard we would have to fight - or how much money we would spend - to give her that. Now 7 years old and in second grade at the Gateway School in Baltimore, my daughter is thriving and continues to progress academically. But her enrollment at one of the state's "nonpublic" special education schools was threatened last year.
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NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2001
Carroll County's plans for a new alternative school are on hold as the Board of Education and county commissioners continue to wrangle over the cost of the project. Designed to house 150 middle school and high school students who need special education programs or other alternative schooling because of behavioral and emotional problems in traditional settings, the Gateway School was scheduled for construction this summer and expected to open in August 2002. But school officials have struggled with the cost of the project for months, trying to meet the budget set by the county commissioners, who have pledged $2.5 million toward construction of the $4.9 million project.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Alcuin H. "Al" Krebs, a retired Baltimore public schools reading resource teacher and World War II combat Marine, died Monday of Alzheimer's disease at Brightwood assisted living in Catonsville. He was 86. The son of a lithographer and a homemaker, Alcuin Henry Krebs, one of 10 children, was born in Baltimore and raised in West Baltimore. He later attended Catonsville High School. "He begged his father to let him enlist in the Marine Corps when he was 17 years old," said a daughter, Nancy Krebs of Severn.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 10, 1998
The principal of Gateway School, an alternative program for middle and high school students, has been reassigned in the Carroll County school system.School officials refused to say why Robert Bowden left Gateway or what his new duties are."Dr. Bowden has been reassigned," said Stephen Guthrie, a personnel specialist with the school system.Guthrie said he could not discuss details of the reassignment because it is a personnel matter.Under school policy, an employee who is reassigned may be transferred to another position or could be placed on administrative leave with pay, Guthrie said.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2004
With much pomp and circumstance, they held a commencement yesterday at Gateway School in Northwest Baltimore. And for only three graduates. The pomp: robes and mortarboards, processions and recessions, songs and honors for the graduates, camera-toting parents, balloons, more than a few tears of joy. The circumstance: One graduate, Darius Roberts, 10, was honored for having learned to control his emotions and to read a few words. Kevin Thomas, 11, was praised for overcoming the turmoil of a rare disorder that causes him to eat compulsively.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1998
When the president of Carroll County Student Government Association invited the Gateway School to elect officers for the first time, teacher Gary Nelson wasn't sure it was a good idea."
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | December 4, 2005
Teens discover new paths Two pyramidal heaps of stone at the entrance mark the start of the winding pathway. They also mark fresh beginnings for the students who have toiled for weeks in the dirt and mulch. The students at the Gateway School in Westminster - an alternative school for middle- and high-school students serving extended suspensions or struggling with learning disabilities or behavioral and emotional problems - acknowledge that at first they whined about having to get their hands and shoes dirty.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2001
Carroll's alternative school, beset with $1.3 million in cost overruns, won site approval yesterday from the county planning commission. The county has budgeted $4.9 million for construction of The Gateway School, a 27,000-square-foot building along Kate Wagner Road in Westminster. The county opted to build a school rather than continue leasing space for the alternative program at Westminster Air Business Center. Kathleen Sanner, school facilities director, said the project is over budget in part because the school system agreed to do off-site work, such as building a regional storm-water management pond.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2004
The stage - if you can call a patchwork of six-inch risers a stage - was set up in the school's "gymteria," a room that is part gymnasium, part cafeteria. A computer cart covered with a white paper tablecloth served as a diploma table. There seemed to be no rhyme or reason to the colors of caps and gowns worn by the graduates. But none of that mattered. The hundreds of parents and cousins, aunts and uncles, siblings, teachers and counselors who crowded into the Gateway School on Tuesday night came for one reason: to see 24 students - many of whom never expected to make it through high school - receive diplomas.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2013
The class at Oakland Mills High School was English for Speakers of Other Languages, which meant the students were accustomed to hearty doses of vocabulary. Even so, they appeared taken aback when Principal Frank Eastham laced his motivational speech with words one would scarcely associate with a school administrator: "truant officer," "welfare," "food stamps" and "learning disability. " During the 40-minute talk about his personal story, Eastham spoke of obstacles he faced while growing up impoverished in Washington, Pa., living on federal assistance, missing as many as 40 days of second grade to take care of an ailing single mother and showing such a lack of interest in school that he talked his mom into keeping him out of college preparatory classes.
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | October 20, 2011
Ethan Harvey hasn't played football in nine years. Before this season, Harvey last played organized football in 2003 - when he was in the third grade. So what is a 17-year-old doing in a Westminster Owls uniform in his senior year of high school, starting for a team that could make a run for a state title? Harvey has made an improbable comeback on and off the field this year as a starting lineman and a key cog for an offense that leads the county in scoring at 30 points a game.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2011
The Howard County Planning Board has voted against funding the purchase of land to build a road that would serve a proposed mixed-use development in Clarksville, a potential setback for the county-backed project, which has struggled to secure highway access. About 150 people, including landowners in the area surrounding the former Gateway School site, showed up to a Thursday hearing in support of Kendall Hardware, which has been a vocal critic of a plan that county officials believe can breathe life into the stalled Clarksville Commons development on the county-owned land.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2011
The empty lot next to Kendall's Hardware in busy Clarksville belies the hopes Howard County Executive Ken Ulman expressed in January 2010 when he announced the choice of developers for what he predicted would be a "dynamic, environmentally friendly and unique" mix of stores, offices and a hotel. There's been no groundbreaking; neither is construction under way on the 7.8-acre site of the former Gateway School on the west side of Route 108. Plans for Clarksville Commons — promoted as a model of new urban design — appear stalled over an old-fashioned dispute over access among the developers, business owners and the county.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2010
After months of negotiations, Howard County has sold the surplus former Gateway school site in Clarksville to a local couple who plan to build a green mixed-use development that could involve Kendall's Hardware next door. "We've reached another milestone — a business milestone," said George Stone, who with his wife, Holly, hopes to settle the $5 million transaction within months and submit plans to the county for processing. The sale agreement was signed May 4 and disclosed last week.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | January 17, 2010
A Clarksville couple with development connections is negotiating to buy the former Gateway School building on Route 108 and redevelop the lot. They envision a mixture of commercial offices, retail and a green boutique hotel. George and Holly Stone were chosen from among six finalists to redevelop the site, where a county-owned, 7.8-acre complex of former school buildings just across the road from the River Hill Village Center is being demolished. Holly Stone is a vice president of Percontee Inc., a Silver Spring building materials and quarry firm owned by the family of her father, the late Homer Gudelsky, a prominent Washington developer.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2004
The stage - if you can call a patchwork of six-inch risers a stage - was set up in the school's "gymteria," a room that is part gymnasium, part cafeteria. A computer cart covered with a white paper tablecloth served as a diploma table. There seemed to be no rhyme or reason to the colors of caps and gowns worn by the graduates. But none of that mattered. The hundreds of parents and cousins, aunts and uncles, siblings, teachers and counselors who crowded into the Gateway School on Tuesday night came for one reason: to see 24 students - many of whom never expected to make it through high school - receive diplomas.
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