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NEWS
September 18, 2011
It is no secret the Maryland Senate is considering a batch of new taxes, including a gasoline tax. But how can a group of highly educated people think it's a good idea to raise any kind of tax at a time when the economy is in the tank, unemployment is skyrocketing and more Americans than ever are living in poverty? I just don't get it. Our state's leaders must understand that Marylanders are being squeezed to death. The well has dried up. Sure, we've heard politicians say tough decisions have to be made during times like these.
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NEWS
July 1, 2014
The Fourth of July weekend is traditionally one of the busiest travel times of the year, and it's a safe bet that a lot of Marylanders will hit the roads to Ocean City and beyond. As often happens when mid-summer vacations beckon, gas prices are up and motorists may be tempted to fume about the state's fuel taxes, which increased on July 1. They shouldn't. If anyone wants to find a culprit for rising gasoline prices, they should look to Iraq and other suppliers and not Annapolis.
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NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 10, 2003
Gov.-elect Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. said last night that he does not intend to push for an increase in Maryland's gasoline tax this year, though he acknowledges that more money will be needed for transportation during his four-year term. Ehrlich and a spokesman disputed published reports yesterday suggesting that he will lobby for a tax increase of 5 cents per gallon. "We have not decided to make it part of our package this year," Ehrlich said in an interview during a reception in his honor at the Walters Art Museum.
NEWS
May 17, 2014
Your article on the gas tax and our deteriorating roads and bridges is right on the point ( "The toll on U.S. roads," May 13). Our infrastructure - roads, bridges, tunnels, ports, water/waste systems - are rated by the American Society of Civil Engineers every four years. The 2013 Report Card gave our infrastructure an overall rating of D+. The cost to bring infrastructure back to a "good" condition is estimated at $3.1 trillion. The emphasis on the gas tax and its impact on the public has certainly been overplayed by politicians who seem to be averse to any increases in any taxes - even those on the 1 percent.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | July 29, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Congressional budget negotiators, aiming to complete a deal by tonight, appeared yesterday to be nearing agreement on a gasoline tax increase of about 6 cents per gallon.All involved cautioned that their talks had reached a highly volatile stage, but they seemed inclined to follow the usual congressional practice of splitting the difference between Senate and House proposals.The House-passed version of Mr. Clinton's budget proposal included a broad-based energy tax on the heat content of fuel that included a gasoline tax increase of about 7.5 cents a gallon.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1998
Although Maryland is awash in cash for other new programs, its special fund for transportation projects is running out of money.Over the next several years, the funding available to build or expand state roads and transit systems is expected to drop sharply while traffic congestion continues to increase.Unless something is done, the state will not be able to start more than 100 planned highway projects, such as widening the Baltimore Beltway in two locations and widening Route 32 in western Howard County.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2002
Laurence Levitan, Commission on Maryland's Fiscal StructureThe task force charged with figuring out how to pay for Maryland's future needs began looking yesterday at possibly increasing the gasoline tax or other fees to pay for the state's transportation projects. Without increased funding, transportation officials warned, the state will fall behind on repairing aging roads and bridges, and on expanding mass transit, boosting security at airports and the port, and replacing the Woodrow Wilson Bridge.
NEWS
November 25, 2012
The latest chart tracking Baltimore-area gasoline prices looks a bit like a sandwich cut in half diagonally, so steep is the decline. A gallon of unleaded has fallen about 28 cents per gallon (nearly 8 percent) since mid-October and is expected to fall further - despite the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays, the busiest travel times of the year. That's substantial, but it's also little noticed by most Marylanders. Economists aren't forecasting a sudden upswing in the job market.
NEWS
July 1, 2014
The Fourth of July weekend is traditionally one of the busiest travel times of the year, and it's a safe bet that a lot of Marylanders will hit the roads to Ocean City and beyond. As often happens when mid-summer vacations beckon, gas prices are up and motorists may be tempted to fume about the state's fuel taxes, which increased on July 1. They shouldn't. If anyone wants to find a culprit for rising gasoline prices, they should look to Iraq and other suppliers and not Annapolis.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
Maryland's Gov. Martin O'Malley is going to push for a higher gasoline tax or sales tax ("VA. Takes the lead," Jan. 10). Meanwhile, Virginia's Gov. Robert McDonnell is pushing for abolition of his state's gasoline tax. So, where would you like to live if you had a choice? F. Cordell, Lutherville
NEWS
May 15, 2014
I have been reading numerous articles on how the transportation budget has been drastically declining, and the proposal is to raise the federal tax per gallon of gasoline. The premise is that with more fuel efficient vehicles on the road, those vehicles use less gas therefore pay less taxes while causing the same amount of damage to infrastructure. My question to The Sun would be: How are you evaluating those conditions? We may have more fuel efficient vehicles, yes, we also have many more vehicles today than in 1956 ( "The toll on U.S. roads," May 14)
NEWS
July 9, 2013
The Sun's recent headlines about rising gambling revenues neglect to note the fact that the companies' profits, or course, represent money lost by the players ("Casino take soars in June," July 6). Add this to the increases in the gasoline tax and bridge and highway tolls, and one would think that the state of Maryland and Baltimore would have no more need of additional taxes. Dream on. What if it doesn't rain? No runoff taxes. What happens if we drink less water? Headline: "Water tax collection drops - people breaking into fire hydrants.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | April 11, 2013
Forty-one years ago, Maryland Gov. Marvin Mandel pulled off a series of staggering triumphs that The Sun compared to winning the Triple Crown: Maryland's first gun-control law; a unique, state-run auto insurance agency; and a higher gasoline tax to support Baltimore's first rapid rail line. He achieved this in the face of ferocious opposition from the National Rifle Association and the insurance and trucking industries. It took Mr. Mandel's enormous persuasive skills - including arm-twisting and deal-making - to win those monumental battles.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley is at it again, and his proposed plan to raise the gasoline tax in Maryland must be defeated ("Gas tax: Pay now or later" Mar. 13). The brunt of Mr. O'Malley's new $3.4 billion gas tax proposal to increase funding for Maryland's transportation needs will fall squarely on Maryland's motorists and gasoline retailers. Under Mr. O'Malley's proposed gas tax hike, Maryland's gas tax rate would skyrocket to 39.5 cents per gallon, and it would become the 5th highest gas tax burden in the nation if gas averaged $3.50 a gallon per year.
NEWS
March 7, 2013
The Maryland Department of Transportation wants to proceed with the light rail Purple Line at a newly raised price tag of $2.15 billion. The Purple Line now costs more than twice the rapid transit bus alternative while yielding only a 25 percent increase in ridership. This is not a cost-effective investment of public dollars. For the cost of the Purple Line, Marylanders could have bus rapid transit along the Purple Line corridor and rapid bus transit along Montgomery County's I-270 corridor plus have a half billion dollars to fund other transportation projects.
NEWS
February 27, 2013
Here's the simple arithmetic behind the gasoline tax. Gasoline sells, at this time, for a little under $4 a gallon. Most of us have autos that get 30 mpg. In the future we will be able to purchase autos that deliver 40 mpg, or those electric cars that don't use gasoline at all. We will have the same number of autos, at least, on our highways in five years as we do today. Our receipts from the current level of taxation will be down by 30 percent or more because the new autos will consume two-thirds the amount of gasoline.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | June 13, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Day after day, radio ads in the Louisiana bayous warned Cajuns of a Washington plot to tax them every time they turned on the air conditioners, televisions or even took "a cold one out of the fridge."In South Dakota, thousands of fliers were distributed that threatened higher prices on all goods from food to fertilizer and a loss of 600,000 American jobs if President Clinton's Btu tax on energy was enacted. The fliers included postage-paid protest notes to be sent to the state's U.S. senators.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2003
Putting aside their usual abhorrence of higher taxes, Baltimore and Washington business groups endorsed an increase in the state's 23 1/2 -cent-per-gallon gasoline tax last night while opposing any effort to limit the use of that revenue to building and maintaining roads. The positions taken by the Greater Baltimore Committee and Greater Washington Board of Trade put them somewhat at odds with the Maryland Chamber of Commerce, which supported a 5-cent increase in the gas tax but asked that it be dedicated to highway projects.
NEWS
February 25, 2013
As I travel on local roads I often see cyclists or biking clubs out for a spin. They pay nothing for the right to use the roads, yet we car owners pay a gasoline tax and a license fee for the privilege, and the more we drive the more we pay. Isn't it time for all those who ride bikes to pay their fair share? It's time to tag bicycles just as we do cars. Instead of increasing the gasoline tax, why not charge cyclists a yearly licensing fee and have them help with road construction, maintenance and repair?
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2013
Taking the first step in grappling with what could become one of the most difficult issues of the 2013 General Assembly, Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller introduced a bill Monday night that would raise hundreds of millions of dollars for transportation projects and shift the more of the burden of financing transit projects to Baltimore and the urban counties. Miller's proposed legislation is expected to be the starting point for discussions with Gov. Martin O'Malley, who has advocated tax increases to pay for transportation but has not submitted a plan this year.
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