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NEWS
February 16, 1992
In the past week, momentum has been building in Annapolis to raise the gasoline tax. It is now the most-favored tax of state legislators as they try to cope with a $1.5 billion deficit over the next 17 months. But politicians ought to resist their initial temptation to siphon off this new revenue source for budget-balancing purposes. Gas-tax money is supposed to be used for transportation programs, and that's where the money should remain.Two plans are now afloat. One, sponsored by Gov. William Donald Schaefer, would raise the gas tax by a nickel, to 23.5 cents a gallon.
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NEWS
October 12, 2014
In his letter, "What Brown isn't saying about taxes" (Oct. 9), J. Michael Collins of Reisterstown complains about higher gasoline taxes enacted by the O'Malley-Brown administration and asks "When is The Sun going to call Brown out ... on what he and [Gov. Martin] O'Malley have done," with the effect of these taxes? I'll tell you what they have done, Mr. Collins. They are building a third northbound lane on Route 29 in Howard County where I live to ease what has become a slow-rolling parking lot every afternoon at rush hour.
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NEWS
By Peter Jensen | January 24, 1992
Gov. William Donald Schaefer has announced plans to speed up $88 million in highway construction projects to boost Maryland's economy, but aides said the plan could hinge on the legislature approving a nickel increase in the gasoline tax."If we advertise for bids now, these jobs can be out on the street as soon as the Department of Transportation has the money to fund them," Governor Schaefer said yesterday in a written statement. "We can put hundreds of Marylanders back to work immediately."
NEWS
By Larry Hogan | October 9, 2014
As I've traversed the state of Maryland, I've learned that effective campaigning means clearly and honestly explaining to voters how your decisions in office would be better than those of your opponent. For Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, however, campaigning involves dodging accountability, remaining invisible on the campaign trail and hiding behind wildly off-base and false attack ads. Lieutenant Governor Brown is unable to defend his eight-year record of failure. He continues to try to distract voters by lying about my stances on long-settled issues, including abortion rights and gun laws.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen | January 24, 1992
Gov. William Donald Schaefer yesterday announced plans to speed up $88 million in highway construction projects to boost Maryland's economy, but aides said the plan could hinge on the legislature approving a nickel increase in the gasoline tax."If we advertise for bids now, these jobs can be out on the street as soon as the Department of Transportation has the money to fund them," Governor Schaefer said in a written statement. "We can put hundreds of Marylanders back to work immediately."Transportation Secretary O. James Lighthizer said his agency will immediately begin advertising 69 maintenance and repair projects for bid under the governor's proposal.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | February 12, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Don't think of it as a gas tax. Think of it as a "jobs" bill.Truckers, gas station dealers, engineers, highway contractors, asphalt firms, sand and gravel companies, business groups and county executives lined up yesterday in support of Gov. William Donald Schaefer's proposal to raise Maryland's 18.5-cents-a-gallon gasoline tax to 23.5 cents a gallon.In different ways, almost all of them said the same thing: Raising the gas tax will jump-start the state's stalled highway construction industry, and that in turn will stimulate the state's recession-weary economy.
NEWS
September 28, 2003
THE RECENT STORMS drenching this state -- and closing major roads, transit systems and rail lines -- provided a graphic reminder of Marylanders' reliance on the state's transportation network. If there's any issue on which state leaders ought to truly take a "One Maryland" approach, ought to forge a statewide vision, it's transportation. The time for that is now: Maryland transportation funding -- more than $10 billion short of the needs identified by the administration of Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. through 2010 -- is deep into a full-blown crisis.
NEWS
May 24, 2011
Last week The Sun's Michael Dresser tried to convince Maryland motorists that they are responsible for the state's roads and that they have not been paying enough in tolls. This week you think motorists should cough up more money for a gas tax increase — even though motorists' fees and taxes have already been boosted this year by O'Malley and company ("A dime's difference," May 23). Roads are part of the city and state infrastructure, as is water, sewage, electricity, etc. They are not just the responsibility of motorists, but of everybody.
NEWS
April 8, 2013
Looks like our "tax and spend" Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley had his way again ("Md. Senate approves increase in gas tax," March 30). The Maryland Senate passed Governor O'Malley's massive 80 percent gasoline tax hike over Easter weekend. Now, Maryland families and businesses will be burdened with the 5th highest gas tax rate in the nation. Adding more pain at the pump and increasing costs of food and daily household items will evaporate more money out your family's budget! The gas tax hike was avoidable and it's not fair that another one of your taxes went up. This new foolish and unnecessary tax burden imposed in Maryland must be remembered by the voters of this state in the next election.
NEWS
January 12, 2013
Maryland's Gov. Martin O'Malley is going to push for a higher gasoline tax or sales tax ("VA. Takes the lead," Jan. 10). Meanwhile, Virginia's Gov. Robert McDonnell is pushing for abolition of his state's gasoline tax. So, where would you like to live if you had a choice? F. Cordell, Lutherville
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
The nation's transportation system is broken, agreed a panel of transportation wonks gathered in downtown Baltimore on Thursday, but they could not agree on how to fix it. "Transportation is broken. There's no way to fund it. America is one big pothole," said Ray LaHood, a former U.S. transportation secretary. "It will be up to the American people to say enough is enough. " Opinions for fixing it at the Greater Baltimore Committee's seventh annual transportation summit ranged from increasing federal investment in local infrastructure projects that would help address broader issues to cutting all federal investment in such projects to focus on national highway needs instead.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
A diverse coalition of business groups, unions and transit advocates is urging Maryland voters to put a constitutional "lockbox" on state transportation funds, making it harder for governors and lawmakers to divert the money to other purposes. Andrew Feldman, a spokesman for the coalition, said more than a dozen groups will contribute money to back Question 1 on the Nov. 4 ballot, which would for the first time give transportation funding explicit protection in the state Constitution.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Anthony G. Brown brightens as he talks about building large transportation projects - including two light rail lines worth a combined $5 billion. To the Democratic nominee for governor, they are a key to creating jobs and stimulating Maryland's economy. His Republican opponent, Larry Hogan, has ice in his voice as he vows to block construction of Baltimore's Red Line and the Purple Line in the Washington suburbs. The GOP candidate sees the mass transit projects as expensive boondoggles that would use money that should be spent on fixing roads.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
Congress returns to work Monday facing a tight deadline to fund highway and road projects across the country, an election-year scramble that has injected uncertainty into state and local construction plans at the start of the summer driving season. Lawmakers have until Aug. 1 to broker an agreement on the dwindling federal highway trust fund - which paid for $37.4 billion in road projects last year - or risk delaying payments to states. The fund is expected to run out of money at the end of August.
NEWS
July 1, 2014
The Fourth of July weekend is traditionally one of the busiest travel times of the year, and it's a safe bet that a lot of Marylanders will hit the roads to Ocean City and beyond. As often happens when mid-summer vacations beckon, gas prices are up and motorists may be tempted to fume about the state's fuel taxes, which increased on July 1. They shouldn't. If anyone wants to find a culprit for rising gasoline prices, they should look to Iraq and other suppliers and not Annapolis.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2014
With gas prices on the rise again, West Baltimore resident Coralee Penner says she may sell the "gas-guzzling" Hummer H3 she's driven since 2007. Penner said she's considering replacing her SUV with a more compact car to save on gas. In the meantime, she's been driving less and planning more. "I deliberate for a while about where I'm going to go and if it's necessary and if I can combine trips and do everything in one go," said Penner at the North Charles Street Hess station, where regular fuel was $3.65 per gallon Monday.
NEWS
April 6, 2012
With regard to Maryland's gas tax or any sales tax increase devoted to the same purpose, we don't trust Gov.Martin O'Malley, his successor or subsequent successors ("O'Malley looks at sales tax increase for roads," April 4). The transportation fund has been raided in the past, and we have no guarantees that it will not be raided in the future. If more revenue is needed to maintain our transportation infrastructure, I think most people would have no real problem with an increase in gas taxes - if the money raised was used for only transportation.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2014
OCEAN CITY — Gubernatorial candidates of both parties promised city and town officials that they would restore local road repair money cut from the state budget by the O'Malley administration. Appearing at the annual convention of the Maryland Municipal League two weeks before the June 24 primary, Democrat Anthony G. Brown and four Republican candidates pledged full restoration of the transportation spending known as "highway user revenue. " That spending was cut back as much as 95 percent by Gov. Martin O'Malley during the recession as the governor chose to shield other spending priorities from deep cuts.
NEWS
May 17, 2014
Your article on the gas tax and our deteriorating roads and bridges is right on the point ( "The toll on U.S. roads," May 13). Our infrastructure - roads, bridges, tunnels, ports, water/waste systems - are rated by the American Society of Civil Engineers every four years. The 2013 Report Card gave our infrastructure an overall rating of D+. The cost to bring infrastructure back to a "good" condition is estimated at $3.1 trillion. The emphasis on the gas tax and its impact on the public has certainly been overplayed by politicians who seem to be averse to any increases in any taxes - even those on the 1 percent.
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