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By Liz F. Kay | April 27, 2011
There are lots of good reasons to monitor your car's gas mileage, not just when gas prices spike . If you suddenly get fewer miles to the tank, it could be a sign that something is wrong with your vehicle, and a early trip to the mechanic might forestall greater damage down the road. That's why we're bringing you Fuelly as our Consumer Website of the Week, discovered via Consumerist . Create an account and enter data after you fill up, and the site will help you see how your fuel economy compares to both your past entries as well as that of other drivers who have the same make and model as you. The site even has a mobile interface so you can enter your data before you pull away from the pump.
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NEWS
May 17, 2014
Your article on the gas tax and our deteriorating roads and bridges is right on the point ( "The toll on U.S. roads," May 13). Our infrastructure - roads, bridges, tunnels, ports, water/waste systems - are rated by the American Society of Civil Engineers every four years. The 2013 Report Card gave our infrastructure an overall rating of D+. The cost to bring infrastructure back to a "good" condition is estimated at $3.1 trillion. The emphasis on the gas tax and its impact on the public has certainly been overplayed by politicians who seem to be averse to any increases in any taxes - even those on the 1 percent.
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BUSINESS
By Sylvia Porter and Sylvia Porter,1989 Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 11, 1990
It's unlikely the price you pay for gasoline at your local service station will come down any time soon.Meantime, automobiles that get good gas mileage will be at a premium, especially on the used car market. The difference between the cars that got the best mileage per gallon in the mid-1970s and those that got the worst, as I recall it, was somewhat broader than it is now. There are far fewer "gas hogs" today than there were 15 years ago.That having been said, as gasoline rises toward and above $1.50 per gallon, you are likely to give more consideration to gas mileage when you choose a car.What's more, the gas price boom will limit your bargaining space when negotiating the purchase of a new, small car. On the other hand, it will produce some real bargains among mid-size cars.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | April 3, 2012
An American and a Dutch company have created their own unique versions of flying cars, and are looking to bring them to market soon. The American firm, Terrafugia , has designed a two-seat vehicle whose wings unfold, runs on gasoline, and can fly off with a propeller. It debuted at the New York Auto Show this week. The Dutch firm, PAL-V Europe N.V ., has built the PAL-V One, a two seat gyrocopter that has three wheels. The rotor and wings fold up neatly into the vehicle.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | April 3, 2012
An American and a Dutch company have created their own unique versions of flying cars, and are looking to bring them to market soon. The American firm, Terrafugia , has designed a two-seat vehicle whose wings unfold, runs on gasoline, and can fly off with a propeller. It debuted at the New York Auto Show this week. The Dutch firm, PAL-V Europe N.V ., has built the PAL-V One, a two seat gyrocopter that has three wheels. The rotor and wings fold up neatly into the vehicle.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp | April 3, 2005
Here we go again. Gasoline prices are breaking through the barrier of $2 a gallon, and some dire forecasts see prices going to $3 by summer. At current prices, a typical family would spend $3,000 a year on gasoline, assuming two vehicles that get 20 miles per gallon and drive 15,000 miles annually. A bump up to $3 a gallon would push annual spending to $4,500. And while you can't do anything about the rise in gasoline prices, you can reduce the amount of gas you use. True, the type of car or truck you drive is the biggest factor in how far you stretch a gallon of gas. So that won't change in the near term, unless you are car-shopping.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | February 24, 2012
Maryland gas prices have risen about 20 cents per gallon since January. At about $3.56 a gallon, according to my colleague Gus Sentementes' story earlier this week, we still have a ways to go before we hit the panic level of $4 a gallon. Still, it's not too early to revisit gas-saving tips now. TrueCar compiled a list of Apps to keep fuel costs down. Here are a few that are free or cheap: GasBuddy - This compiles a list of gas prices based on consumer input. Free. iGasUp - Pricing info on 110,000 gas stations based on credit card transactions.
BUSINESS
By The Detroit News | July 3, 2007
With gas prices hovering near $3 a gallon, that bottle in the auto parts store or gadget on a Web site that claims to "improve fuel economy by 20 percent" can sound awfully enticing, but federal regulators caution consumers not to act too quickly. A recent consumer warning from the Federal Trade Commission showed that gas gadgets such as air bleed devices, mixture enhancers and fuel additives rarely pay off. In fact, they're 0-for-93. The Environmental Protection Agency's Ann Arbor, Mich.
NEWS
May 17, 2014
Your article on the gas tax and our deteriorating roads and bridges is right on the point ( "The toll on U.S. roads," May 13). Our infrastructure - roads, bridges, tunnels, ports, water/waste systems - are rated by the American Society of Civil Engineers every four years. The 2013 Report Card gave our infrastructure an overall rating of D+. The cost to bring infrastructure back to a "good" condition is estimated at $3.1 trillion. The emphasis on the gas tax and its impact on the public has certainly been overplayed by politicians who seem to be averse to any increases in any taxes - even those on the 1 percent.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | November 1, 2007
Bright chill October days of sweet dry smells, smoke and apples and pigskin, memories of touch football games on grassy fields strewn with dry leaves. "You go deep," our QB said, thinking that a big, lanky kid like me must be a good receiver, so I galloped deep looking back over my shoulder, but I was not, in fact, all that terribly interested in actually fighting for possession of the ball. I was brought up to share, not to snatch things away from other people. Aggressiveness was not a prime value in my family.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | February 24, 2012
Maryland gas prices have risen about 20 cents per gallon since January. At about $3.56 a gallon, according to my colleague Gus Sentementes' story earlier this week, we still have a ways to go before we hit the panic level of $4 a gallon. Still, it's not too early to revisit gas-saving tips now. TrueCar compiled a list of Apps to keep fuel costs down. Here are a few that are free or cheap: GasBuddy - This compiles a list of gas prices based on consumer input. Free. iGasUp - Pricing info on 110,000 gas stations based on credit card transactions.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | June 24, 2011
Beginning July 1, workers who use their car for business and don't get reimbursed from their employer will be able to deduct 55 1/2 cents per mile on tax returns. That's 4 1/2 cents more than the rate for the first half of this year. The IRS says it is making the adjustment because of rising gas prices this year. Those who use their cars for medical or moving purposes will be able to deduct 23.5 cents per mile, up from 19 cents.  The mileage rate for motorists using their car for charitable works remains the same at 14 cents per mile.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | May 12, 2011
So,it sounds like there's a respite in store for those who have been struggling with rising gas prices , according to Mike Dresser over at Getting There. While the average price around the state has exceeded $4 a gallon, it's not expected to stay there, Dresser reported. Whether it will drop by Memorial Day remains to be seen, but hopefully this summer won't be as painful for drivers as it has been in the past. But regardless of whether gas prices are over or under $4 per gallon, it makes good fiscal sense to improve the fuel economy of our vehicles.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | April 27, 2011
There are lots of good reasons to monitor your car's gas mileage, not just when gas prices spike . If you suddenly get fewer miles to the tank, it could be a sign that something is wrong with your vehicle, and a early trip to the mechanic might forestall greater damage down the road. That's why we're bringing you Fuelly as our Consumer Website of the Week, discovered via Consumerist . Create an account and enter data after you fill up, and the site will help you see how your fuel economy compares to both your past entries as well as that of other drivers who have the same make and model as you. The site even has a mobile interface so you can enter your data before you pull away from the pump.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | January 29, 2010
Amazing what a difference a sensible law can make. Two years ago, Congress and President George W. Bush agreed to reduce pollution and America's addiction to overseas oil by requiring automobiles to get better mileage. Now, General Motors is spending $246 million to expand its White Marsh plant and make its own electric motors, giving Baltimore a ride on the auto-technology pace car. Barring an unlikely decision to resurrect GM's auto-assembly plant here, it's hard to imagine better news for regional manufacturing.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp and Gregory Karp,Tribune Newspapers | May 24, 2009
With Memorial Day signaling the start of the summer driving season, you'll be hearing about how to save money on gasoline. While tips are plentiful, some are better than others. And there are some you might not have heard before. Here is a quiz: The No. 1 way to save is to change your driving habits.: True. This tip blows away all the others. On the highway, try driving at 55-60 mph. Every 5 mph over 60 is like paying an extra 25 cents per gallon, according to government estimates. Even on a lengthy commute, driving faster gets you there only a few minutes sooner.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Bob Erle and Paul Adams and Bob Erle,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2004
Marylanders say they're very concerned about the high price of gasoline. So concerned, in fact, that in a new statewide poll for The Sun, 62 percent of those surveyed said they will think twice about the size and gas mileage of the next car they buy. But the same poll shows that when it comes to taking simple gas-saving steps like using public transportation, cutting down on shopping trips or vacationing closer to home, an even larger percentage are...
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | February 3, 2008
With gas prices headed for record highs, Roy Berkeridge thought about swapping his pickup for a more fuel-efficient car. But instead, the 52-year-old Halethorpe resident recently decided to lease a new Ford Edge -- an SUV that gets slightly better gas mileage than a truck but is still roomy and hefty. "I like the nice sturdy, heavy vehicles," said Berkeridge. "I don't really like small compact cars. I just don't feel secure in them. I like to feel armor around me for protection." A new federal fuel-efficiency law is designed to make sure that motorists like Berkeridge can continue to buy the SUVs they prefer -- and that Detroit can continue to make them.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | February 3, 2008
With gas prices headed for record highs, Roy Berkeridge thought about swapping his pickup for a more fuel-efficient car. But instead, the 52-year-old Halethorpe resident recently decided to lease a new Ford Edge -- an SUV that gets slightly better gas mileage than a truck but is still roomy and hefty. "I like the nice sturdy, heavy vehicles," said Berkeridge. "I don't really like small compact cars. I just don't feel secure in them. I like to feel armor around me for protection." A new federal fuel-efficiency law is designed to make sure that motorists like Berkeridge can continue to buy the SUVs they prefer -- and that Detroit can continue to make them.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | November 1, 2007
Bright chill October days of sweet dry smells, smoke and apples and pigskin, memories of touch football games on grassy fields strewn with dry leaves. "You go deep," our QB said, thinking that a big, lanky kid like me must be a good receiver, so I galloped deep looking back over my shoulder, but I was not, in fact, all that terribly interested in actually fighting for possession of the ball. I was brought up to share, not to snatch things away from other people. Aggressiveness was not a prime value in my family.
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