Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGas Main
IN THE NEWS

Gas Main

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1997
Five buildings were evacuated and classes were canceled briefly yesterday at Goucher College after construction workers sliced through a gas main at Van Meter Hall. No one was injured, authorities said.The mishap occurred just before 11 a.m. as construction workers continued renovation of Van Meter Hall, the campus humanities building. No students were in Van Meter, but about three dozen students in four buildings around it were evacuated as a precaution, said Goucher spokeswoman Cami Colarossi.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Traffic in downtown Baltimore was being effected Wednesday morning by Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. crews blocking lanes of S. Charles Street between Pratt and Lombard streets for emergency repairs to a 12-inch-wide gas main, according to Rachael Lighty, a company spokeswoman. Lane closures will be in effect "until the work is complete," Lighty said. No estimate for when that will occur was given. Also Wednesday morning, a two-vehicle collision on Interstate 95 in Howard County, prior to Route 175, had closed one lane and the right-hand shoulder as of 8:30 a.m., according to the state Department of Transportation.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 7, 1995
Annapolis fire officials closed a key portion of Aris T. Allen Boulevard for more than two hours after a backhoe operator struck a gas main yesterday afternoon.Capt. Leonard Clark, spokesman for the Annapolis Fire Department, said the worker was helping build townhouses in Oxford Landing for Crystal Custom Homes of Stevensville when he hit a 2-inch gas main maintained by Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. at 1:45 p.m.The rupture sent gas vapors across Aris T. Allen Boulevard for several blocks and forced fire officials to close off a mile-long stretch of the highway between Chinquapin Road and Route 2, Captain Clark said.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
A gas main break near Overlea High School closed Kenwood Avenue Wednesday afternoon and forced 10 homes to be evacuated, Baltimore County police said. BGE stopped the gas leak at Kenwood and East avenues, around 3 p.m. and officials said Kenwood Avenue was expected to reopen Wednesday afternoon. No injuries were reported. Separately, BGE said Wednesday that it was upgrading natural gas mains in 10 Baltimore-area neighborhoods and will start six additional projects next year.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1996
A backhoe operator struck a gas main last night in Perry Hall, causing natural gas to rush out with a deafening roar that alarmed nearby residents, Baltimore County fire and BGE officials said.The incident, which was reported about 11: 10 p.m., occurred at Belair and Joppa roads, where the 2-inch, high-pressure main was struck by a backhoe operator working for a contractor doing repair work at the intersection.Police closed area streets to traffic to avoid any sparks that could ignite the leaking gas.Many residents living near the site of the leak were alerted to it by the sound it made, and they placed worried calls to 911 and the local police precinct trying to find out what was going on."
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN REAL ESTATE EDITOR | July 18, 1999
For the better part of the decade, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. has been trying to get homeowners to switch from oil, propane or electric heat to natural gas.If a neighborhood met BGE's criteria and there was moderate interest from homeowners, gas mains would be extended and residents would have to pay a flat fee to bring a line to the home and purchase a gas appliance within a year of being connected. No deposit was required for the conversion.Even though 11,400 homeowners converted to gas since 1994, many more, who once expressed interest, decided against gas conversion.
NEWS
By Grant Huang and Grant Huang,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2004
Repair work on a natural gas line shut down a stretch of Light Street near the Inner Harbor yesterday afternoon, snarling traffic during the busy Friday rush hour and threatening to disrupt downtown travel through the weekend. Authorities said Light Street between Conway Street and Key Highway could remain closed until tomorrow as crews with Baltimore Gas and Electric worked to repair a pipe connected to a major gas main near the Maryland Science Center. But a BGE spokeswoman said last night that officials hoped to complete the repairs overnight and reopen the street early today.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | December 25, 1997
A transformer fire fed by a gas line burned for several hours in Cockeysville yesterday morning, leading to the evacuation of several office buildings, fire officials said. No one was injured.The fire started shortly before 6 a.m. in a transformer on the ground between two parking lots at 10707 Gilroy Road, said county fire spokesman Mark Hubbard.One fire engine was called, and firefighters sprayed the fire first with water and then with foam. But it continued to burn because it was being fed by a nearby gas main, said Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. spokeswoman Peggy Mulloy.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2004
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. workers reported finding hundreds more homes in Overlea affected by Saturday's dual water and gas main breaks, while angry residents demanded answers last night about who would pay for the damage and when gas service would resume. Some of the nearly 200 residents attending an emergency community meeting at Fullerton Elementary School shouted, "Class action lawsuit!" when a representative from the Baltimore Department of Public Works tried to speak. "We don't know right now who's responsible," said DPW spokesman Kurt L. Kocher.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 25, 2004
The number of homes and businesses affected by a combination water-main break and leaking gas line in Overlea grew to 1,600 yesterday after officials with Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. discovered that water had gotten into a gas main along Belair Road. Water was restored to about 210 homes and 13 businesses late Saturday, hours after the dual breaks, which caused several furnace fires on Cardwell Avenue, were discovered. But restoring gas has been much more difficult, said BGE spokeswoman Linda Foy. Utility workers initially found water in a damaged 6-inch gas line on Cardwell Avenue.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
Renee Washington says she's not asking for special treatment from City Hall. The 58-year-old paraplegic just wants to make sure she and her neighbors are reimbursed for the stoves and water heaters damaged during a Valentine's Day gas main break that caused water to rush into their appliances. "We want to make hot meals for our families," says Washington, a resident of the Southwest Baltimore neighborhood of Mill Hill, who is attempting to organize her neighbors to action. "We want to take hot showers and baths.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2012
A swath of the Millhill neighborhood of Southwest Baltimore lost natural gas and water service early Tuesday — and gas outages may continue for several days, according to the utility operators. At around 3:30 a.m., while Baltimore Department of Public Works crews were working on a 10-inch water main in the 300 block of Millington Ave., a 4-inch gas line was broken, statements from the DPW and Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. said Tuesday afternoon. About 100 homes lost water along Millington Avenue between Frederick and Wilkens avenues and Ashton Street between Millington Avenue and Catherine Street, according to the DPW. Water was also shut off at a senior community in the 400 block of Millington Ave. and at Frederick Elementary School.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2011
Around 10 a.m. Thursday an Amtrak contractor struck a 24-inch gas main on the property of Penn Station in Baltimore, a utility spokeswoman said. Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. responded to the scene and were continuing work on shutting off the gas line at around 2 p.m., said Rachael Lighty. Only buildings on the Penn Station property are expected to lose gas service because of the leak, she said, but BGE is having employees canvass the area to ensure no residential gas users have lost service.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green | egreen@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
Baltimore Gas and Electric crews have repaired a gas main break in Severna Park, and are in the process of restoring service to homes that lost gas Thursday morning, a BGE spokeswoman said. Crews repaired damage to a 2 inch gas main on Whites Road, in the Cattail Creek neighborhood, which appears to have been caused by a contractor striking a gas line, said BGE spokeswoman Linda Foy. Two customers lost gas this afternoon, and were due to have it restored once BGE workers could access the homes, she said.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson | October 28, 2006
BGE workers fixed the ruptured gas main yesterday that caused dowtown street closures and rush-hour traffic tie-ups but have yet to determine the exact cause of the leaks. "We don't know what, if anything, we will be able to determine conclusively," Linda Foy, a spokeswoman for BGE, said yesterday. Workers completed repairs about 3 p.m. yesterday. Charles Street at Pratt and Lombard streets was reopened at 3:30 p.m., in time for the evening rush hour. The streets were closed Thursday during afternoon and evening rush hour after gas leaks sent two manhole covers into the air. Metal plates were placed over the areas where the repairs were made, and the area will be repaved this weekend, a spokesman for the Department of Transportation said.
NEWS
By Nick Shields and Nick Shields,sun reporter | October 6, 2006
A road that is normally bustling with traffic was shut down. An auto dealership's lot had plenty of cars, but just about no one there to buy them. And with the smell of natural gas hanging in the air, an office building was evacuated. "I'm freaking out a little bit," said Jana Cowperthwaite, who was among the workers asked to leave the Prosperity Mortgage Corp. offices in Lutherville yesterday. The disruption in the daily routine along York Road in Lutherville was caused by a rupture to a 6-inch gas main.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1999
Utility workers ruptured a natural gas line in Westminster yesterday, forcing the evacuation of about 10 homes and businesses, and snarling traffic for more than seven hours, authorities said.No one was injured, and local and state police shut down access to Route 97 and East Main Street soon after a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. crew boring under the intersection to replace a gas main accidentally struck a 2-inch main at 12: 05 p.m.The underground rupture was quickly vented to prevent a fire or an explosion, said Lt. Charles Simpson, spokesman for the Westminster Fire Engine & Hose Co. No. 1.As BGE crews opened a gaping hole in the roadway to expose the leaking main, orange clouds of dust and fumes spewed into the air, at times causing observers 40 yards away to cover their noses and mouths as the noxious odor of natural gas became stronger.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and Tom Pelton and TaNoah Morgan and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1999
Construction workers grading a parking lot in Maryland City accidentally ruptured a six-inch gas main yesterday, forcing emergency workers to shut down Route 198 during the morning rush hour and evacuate about 30 people from a hotel and nearby townhouses.Anne Arundel County police closed Route 198 from Whiskey Bottom Road to Russett Green West and rerouted traffic around the gas leak onto local streets, causing delays of 2 1/2 hours.Three children at Maryland City Elementary School were treated for minor ailments -- a stomachache, a nosebleed and asthma -- that might have been related to the gas fumes, said Capt.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2004
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. workers reported finding hundreds more homes in Overlea affected by Saturday's dual water and gas main breaks, while angry residents demanded answers last night about who would pay for the damage and when gas service would resume. Some of the nearly 200 residents attending an emergency community meeting at Fullerton Elementary School shouted, "Class action lawsuit!" when a representative from the Baltimore Department of Public Works tried to speak. "We don't know right now who's responsible," said DPW spokesman Kurt L. Kocher.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2004
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. workers reported finding hundreds more homes in Overlea affected by Saturday's dual water and gas main breaks, while angry residents demanded answers last night about who would pay for the damage and when gas service would resume. Some of the nearly 200 residents attending an emergency community meeting at Fullerton Elementary School shouted, "Class action lawsuit!" when a representative from the Baltimore Department of Public Works tried to speak. "We don't know right now who's responsible," said DPW spokesman Kurt L. Kocher.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.