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By Steve Weinberg and Steve Weinberg,Special to the sun | June 14, 1998
Investigative journalist Gary Webb has just published a boo quite likely to rekindle a national debate that appeared to be laid to rest a year ago. The book is "Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Crack Cocaine Explosion" (Seven Stories Press, 548 pages, $24.95). The book ought to recall Webb from the journalistic netherworld to which he has been exiled. Whether it will remains to be seen.Two years ago, it looked as if Webb would be the next Bob Woodward, a hero because of the corruption he exposed.
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By Steve Weinberg and Steve Weinberg,Special to the sun | June 14, 1998
Investigative journalist Gary Webb has just published a boo quite likely to rekindle a national debate that appeared to be laid to rest a year ago. The book is "Dark Alliance: The CIA, the Contras, and the Crack Cocaine Explosion" (Seven Stories Press, 548 pages, $24.95). The book ought to recall Webb from the journalistic netherworld to which he has been exiled. Whether it will remains to be seen.Two years ago, it looked as if Webb would be the next Bob Woodward, a hero because of the corruption he exposed.
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By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | March 22, 1992
Jocelyn Haynes, an eighth-grader at Bel Air Middle School, says she already is feeling pressure from her peers to drink alcohol.Many of her classmates, the 13-year-old says, believe they have to drink beer when at parties to be seen as cool."
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By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | March 22, 1992
Jocelyn Haynes, an eighth-grader at Bel Air Middle School, says she already is feeling pressure from her peers to drink alcohol.Many of her classmates, the 13-year-old says, believe they have to drink beer when at parties to be seen as cool."
NEWS
By Peter Kornbluh | August 30, 1998
In the late summer of 1984, the CIA faced what secret documents called the "potential for disaster." Congress was debating a full cutoff of funding for the Reagan administration's covert Contra war in Nicaragua. At that delicate political moment, legal proceedings in a major drug bust in San Francisco threatened to publicly link CIA-Contra operations with cocaine trafficking.A CIA official summed up the Agency's concerns over publicity this way: "What would make better headlines?" The agent, identified only as Ms. Jones, told investigators that the CIA quietly intervened in the case because it could have had an "explosive" impact on the Agency's mission.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 17, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Central Intelligence Agency continued to work with about two dozen Nicaraguan rebels and their supporters during the 1980s despite allegations that they were trafficking in drugs, according to a classified study by the CIA.The new study has found that the CIA's decision to keep these paid agents, or to continue dealing with them in some less-formal relationship, was made by top officials at the agency's headquarters in Langley, Va., in...
NEWS
May 15, 1997
HOW THE American people feel about the CIA is important. Spying and clandestine operations are vital to the national security, but they also cause unease in a nation that reveres open government. So when the San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News published a series that strongly implied the CIA was involved in the sale of crack cocaine to help finance Nicaraguan rebels fighting the Sandinistas in the 1980s, the repercussions were nationwide. Especially in the black community, where suspicions about the CIA and the FBI run deep.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | September 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A firestorm has erupted over some ` profoundly disturbing charges that operatives of the Central Intelligence Agency introduced crack cocaine into the black ghettos of America in the 1980s to raise money illegally to support the Nicaraguan contras.If this is true, then millions of black lives have been ruined and America's jails and prisons are now clogged with young African Americans because of a cynical plot by a CIA that historically has operated in contempt of the law.CIA Director John M. Deutch has issued a typical vague denial of CIA guilt, and Attorney General Janet Reno has said that a ''preliminary'' Justice Department investigation has not turned up evidence to support the allegations.
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By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2005
Lisa Waterman and Ryan Wilkerson are cooking-class buddies. They've taken courses on how to prepare salmon and how to make homemade pasta and recently found themselves slaving over a Greek menu at a cooking class at Anne Arundel Community College. They've had some mixed luck when they've tried to re-create class recipes at home. A botched batch of gnocchi was particularly memorable. "It was a mess," said Waterman. "We used 5 pounds of flour. I had to go beg my neighbors for it at 2 a.m."
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By L'Oreal Thompson, Baltimore Sun Media Group | November 5, 2012
Wedding day: Oct. 14, 2012 Her story: Lauren Webb, 26, grew up in Glen Burnie. She is the grants manager for Young Audiences Arts for Learning Maryland. Her father, Gary Webb, works for Verizon, and her mother, Renee Webb, is a neonatal nurse at the University of Maryland Medical Center. His story: Brennan Tolstoi, 29, grew up in Gaithersburg. He is an assistant branch manager for M&T Bank. His father, Joel Tolstoi, owns Oval Office Supply, and his mother, Deborah Tolstoi, works for the family company as a bookkeeper/office manager.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 2, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Maxine Waters should have been wearing red. The woman was that hot -- as in burning up angry.But her purple outfit would have to do, as she minced no words in telling the group of students standing near a pool within a block of the U.S. Capitol about the allegations that the CIA funded a group of Nicaraguan contras who flooded her southern Los Angeles district with crack cocaine.Some -- but, significantly, not very many -- have called for a congressional investigation into the allegations.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 15, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Even though the editor of the San Jose Mercury News said an internal review found serious flaws in his newspaper's "Dark Alliance" series of reports, people who believed the articles' implication of a direct link between the CIA and the crack cocaine epidemic continue to press for a congressional investigation.Rep. Maxine Waters said Tuesday that the newspaper's criticism of its series, in an unusual Sunday column by executive editor Jerry Ceppos, had not convinced her that the articles were fundamentally unsound.
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