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By Los Angeles Times | April 24, 1991
HOLLYWOOD -- Gary Oldman ("Sid & Nancy") as the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas. His real-life wife, Uma Thurman ("Henry and June"), as Thomas' wife. The appeal of the $4.5 million "Dylan," to be produced by London's Harlech Films (a division of HTV International) and distributed by Miramax, was apparent. But a funny thing happened on the way to the screen.Nine days into the late-January shoot, Oldman collapsed on the set in Wales, said by doctors to be suffering from "nervous exhaustion." The production was shut down, in the words of a press release, "until such time as Oldman has regained his health and is available to re-start work."
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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1997
"Air Force One" is not by Tom Clancy. Harrison Ford is not playing Jack Ryan.Could've fooled me.The movie, a slickly crafted action thriller, portrays the president as the now-familiar humble hero, a Vietnam veteran, Medal of Honor winner, Michigan football fan and family man. His unextraordinary yet stalwart name is James Marshall. By rights, he should be eating apple pie and listening to Elvis. Or maybe battling the aliens in "Independence Day."He's so perfect, he's boring.It's not Ford's fault.
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | October 5, 1990
The mob films continue. The latest is ''State of Grace,'' in which the Irish-Americans are the hoods.The film is based on the lives of the Westies, an Irish gang that operated a few years back and, for a time, terrified the West Side of New York.They don't so much terrify as befuddle in the film. The movie, done in very naturalistic style by director Phil Joanou, is more muddled than entertaining. Usually, the basics of a mob plot are enough to carry it along, compensate for bad sound and dense dialogue, but not here.
NEWS
May 29, 1995
Christopher Reeve hurt in horse-jumping eventWhile engaging in a horse jumping competition Saturday, Christopher Reeve was thrown from his steed and wound up in the hospital.Mr. Reeve, 42, was approaching the third jump of a 15-jump course when "something spooked the horse," said Monk Reynolds, owner of Commonwealth Park in Culpeper, Va. "His horse just stopped dead and threw him."Mr. Reeve, best known for his performances in the "Superman" movies, appeared to suffer a neck injury and was carried off the field on a stretcher.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 19, 1994
HOLLYWOOD -- The earthquake didn't wake up members of one Los Angeles movie crew. They were in the middle of production, filming just miles from the epicenter."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Mooney and Josh Mooney,Los Angeles Times Syndicate L | August 16, 1991
SCENES FROM A MALLTouchstone Home Video$92.95Director Paul Mazursky's "Scenes" is mostly forced comedy routines and mean-spirited cracks at the upper-middle class, rendered fairly harmless because the filmmaker's point is never quite clear.Woody Allen, playing a less pleasant (and less amusing) version of the neurotic middle-aged hero of his own films, is Nick, a successful sports lawyer spending the day at the Beverly Center Mall in Los Angeles with wife Deborah (Bette Midler), a pop psychologist who has written a best-selling book on marriage.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | July 22, 1994
On tonight's TV lineup, cable's where the action is. Broadcast TV, on the other hand, is where the reruns are.* "Encounters: The Hidden Truth" (8-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- This is one show that isn't a network rerun tonight -- but when it's not worth watching the first time around, what's the difference? One of tonight's reports concerns people who allegedly received skin implants from outer-space aliens. The good news is, these doctors make house calls. The bad news, I guess, is that the skin is a different color, and it's not easy being green.
NEWS
May 29, 1995
Christopher Reeve hurt in horse-jumping eventWhile engaging in a horse jumping competition Saturday, Christopher Reeve was thrown from his steed and wound up in the hospital.Mr. Reeve, 42, was approaching the third jump of a 15-jump course when "something spooked the horse," said Monk Reynolds, owner of Commonwealth Park in Culpeper, Va. "His horse just stopped dead and threw him."Mr. Reeve, best known for his performances in the "Superman" movies, appeared to suffer a neck injury and was carried off the field on a stretcher.
FEATURES
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | September 13, 1993
Considering he's one of the hottest young stars in an industry built on image, Christian Slater is looking particularly disheveled late one afternoon on the balcony of a Los Angeles hotel suite.He's got a scraggly beard and wild hair, his clothes are wrinkled and the eyes are stark evidence of a serious lack of sleep."I want to look good when I go out," says an apologetic Mr. Slater, 24, who stars in the film "True Romance," which opened Friday. "Well, I hope at least to look clean. I don't want to offend anybody."
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1997
"Air Force One" is not by Tom Clancy. Harrison Ford is not playing Jack Ryan.Could've fooled me.The movie, a slickly crafted action thriller, portrays the president as the now-familiar humble hero, a Vietnam veteran, Medal of Honor winner, Michigan football fan and family man. His unextraordinary yet stalwart name is James Marshall. By rights, he should be eating apple pie and listening to Elvis. Or maybe battling the aliens in "Independence Day."He's so perfect, he's boring.It's not Ford's fault.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | July 22, 1994
On tonight's TV lineup, cable's where the action is. Broadcast TV, on the other hand, is where the reruns are.* "Encounters: The Hidden Truth" (8-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- This is one show that isn't a network rerun tonight -- but when it's not worth watching the first time around, what's the difference? One of tonight's reports concerns people who allegedly received skin implants from outer-space aliens. The good news is, these doctors make house calls. The bad news, I guess, is that the skin is a different color, and it's not easy being green.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 19, 1994
HOLLYWOOD -- The earthquake didn't wake up members of one Los Angeles movie crew. They were in the middle of production, filming just miles from the epicenter."
FEATURES
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | September 13, 1993
Considering he's one of the hottest young stars in an industry built on image, Christian Slater is looking particularly disheveled late one afternoon on the balcony of a Los Angeles hotel suite.He's got a scraggly beard and wild hair, his clothes are wrinkled and the eyes are stark evidence of a serious lack of sleep."I want to look good when I go out," says an apologetic Mr. Slater, 24, who stars in the film "True Romance," which opened Friday. "Well, I hope at least to look clean. I don't want to offend anybody."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Mooney and Josh Mooney,Los Angeles Times Syndicate L | August 16, 1991
SCENES FROM A MALLTouchstone Home Video$92.95Director Paul Mazursky's "Scenes" is mostly forced comedy routines and mean-spirited cracks at the upper-middle class, rendered fairly harmless because the filmmaker's point is never quite clear.Woody Allen, playing a less pleasant (and less amusing) version of the neurotic middle-aged hero of his own films, is Nick, a successful sports lawyer spending the day at the Beverly Center Mall in Los Angeles with wife Deborah (Bette Midler), a pop psychologist who has written a best-selling book on marriage.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | April 24, 1991
HOLLYWOOD -- Gary Oldman ("Sid & Nancy") as the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas. His real-life wife, Uma Thurman ("Henry and June"), as Thomas' wife. The appeal of the $4.5 million "Dylan," to be produced by London's Harlech Films (a division of HTV International) and distributed by Miramax, was apparent. But a funny thing happened on the way to the screen.Nine days into the late-January shoot, Oldman collapsed on the set in Wales, said by doctors to be suffering from "nervous exhaustion." The production was shut down, in the words of a press release, "until such time as Oldman has regained his health and is available to re-start work."
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | October 5, 1990
The mob films continue. The latest is ''State of Grace,'' in which the Irish-Americans are the hoods.The film is based on the lives of the Westies, an Irish gang that operated a few years back and, for a time, terrified the West Side of New York.They don't so much terrify as befuddle in the film. The movie, done in very naturalistic style by director Phil Joanou, is more muddled than entertaining. Usually, the basics of a mob plot are enough to carry it along, compensate for bad sound and dense dialogue, but not here.
FEATURES
By Chris Hewitt and Chris Hewitt,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 15, 1998
It's called "Quest for Camelot," but it's more like "Camelittle."Oh, Merlin and King Arthur make brief appearances, but there's no Mordred, no Morgan le Fay, no Guinevere. Instead, there's Kayley, a generically Disneyesque heroine who comes of age by helping a blind stud named Garrett track down the sword that's been plucked from the stone it's supposed to be in.Naturally, there's a bad guy -- Gary Oldman supplying the voice of Ruber, a vain brute.There are some pretty backdrops and a few of the jokes will crack up adults.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2008
Tomorrow A Secret: (Strand Releasing) A 15-year-old boy unearths a shocking family secret. With Cecile De France, Patrick Bruel and Ludivine Sagnier. Next Friday Bride Wars : (20th Century Fox) Childhood best friends plan their weddings, each at New York's ultimate bridal destination, the Plaza Hotel. But a clerical error and clash in wedding dates pit the two brides against each other in a competition that quickly escalates into all-out war. With Kate Hudson, Anne Hathaway and Candice Bergen.
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