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By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1996
Good morning! And what a lovely morning it is. We have something very special to tell our readers. Research shows you daily spend 4.6 minutes with the newspaper, leaving you 0.6 minutes to spend on this story. Better get to the point.This is something very special. Without further delay (the clock is ticking!) let's get to it.No, it's not a special offer of a $36 Sun sweat shirt featuring your favorite features writer. And no, The Evening Sun won't be exhumed. This is even more special.So, without further delay, dear readers, please welcome back to our pages the fabulous, the wonderful, the hilarious, the memorable, the framable, the best darn cartoon panel a quality, hometown newspaper could deliver to its readersPut that coffee down, Dad Kids, hold that homework Fido, hold that bladderLet's all welcome back"THE FAR SIDE."
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2003
The weird. The macabre. The just plain silly. For 14 years, Gary Larson's The Far Side was all that, and more. Until Larson and his single-panel comic strip came along, who knew that cows could talk, much less drink cocktails? That vultures could walk into a diner and order carrion to go? That the real reason dinosaurs are extinct is that they smoked cigarettes? For the next three months, beginning today in LIVE!, Sun readers will be able to revisit the best of The Far Side. Although Larson won't be breaking his decade-old pledge to stop drawing new panels, he's got a new collection of the old strips coming out this month.
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NEWS
October 5, 1994
Dying's easy. Comedy's hard.We were reminded of that aphorism of the stage with the news that Gary Larson, creator of the immensely popular cartoon strip, "The Far Side," was retiring at age 44. After 15 years of the daily grind, Mr. Larson said he feared that if he continued much longer his work would "ease into the Graveyard of Mediocre Cartoons."For those not familiar with Mr. Larson's body of work, they were like any of the best newspaper funnies in that they brightened the day a bit. What made his different was that the reader often found himself wondering, "Who thinks up this stuff?"
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | April 20, 2003
BEFORE I GET to today's topic ("Worms Making News"), I want to apologize to those readers, both human and elf, who were unhappy with my column on The Lord of the Rings. It turns out that my readership includes some very serious fans of the movie and the classic book by the late J.R. "Scooter" Tolkien. Many of these fans took time out from their busy schedules to write lengthy letters detailing the errors in my column, and observing that I am a stupid idiot. Here are some of the specific points they made (I am not making these points up)
FEATURES
By Beth Hannan 44TC and Beth Hannan 44TC,Contributing Writer | July 5, 1993
If you think you've seen these giant bugs, talking animals and other assorted odd creatures on the comics pages before, you might have.Gary Larson -- creator of "The Far Side" comic strip, which appears in The Sun and The Evening Sun -- will be on vacation this month. During that time, Universal Press Syndicate (the company that distributes Mr. Larson's work) will run "The Far Side" comic strips from 1988 as a replacement.Why strips from 1988? So that, with luck, readers won't remember them as well and they will seem fresh, says the company.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer Howard Henry Chen also contributed to this story | October 4, 1994
In Gary Larson's warped world, cows party on all twos, dinosaurs smoke themselves into extinction, and deer with unfortunate "bull's eye" birthmarks earn the sympathies of fellow deer.But after 15 years, Gary Larson's "Far Side" gallery will close Jan. 1. Mr. Larson, whose cartoons appear in more than 1,500 newspapers, is calling it quits.His reasons for retiring were "simple fatigue and a fear that if I continue for many more years my work will begin to suffer or at the very least ease into the Graveyard of Mediocre Cartoons," said Mr. Larson, 44, in a statement released yesterday.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 26, 1994
A lot of Halloween-themed shows appear on TV tonight, but the trick is to gravitate to the true treats: a "Far Side" special on CBS, the annual "Roseanne" Halloween bash on ABC and an Eagles concert on MTV.* "Beverly Hills, 90210" (8-9 p.m., Channel 45) -- There's a Halloween costume party as part of tonight's show, which means the young women of "Beverly Hills, 90210" will be wearing even more makeup than usual. (To quote Count Floyd: "Oooh, that's scarrry, boys and girls.") Also part of the plot, though, is a violent showdown between Dylan (Luke Perry)
FEATURES
By Carol Monaghan * "Anthology for the Earth," edited by Judy Allen ($22, Candlewick Press), is a poignant collection of people's writings on the environment. We hear from famous authors, Indian chiefs, environmentalists, Buddhists and regular kids about their love for nature. This beautiful book brings home the frightening message that we are destroying the delicate balance that is nature and endangering Earth's survival. Amanda Vogt Rips & Raves; Sony's 'Rascal' is a lame game and Carol Monaghan * "Anthology for the Earth," edited by Judy Allen ($22, Candlewick Press), is a poignant collection of people's writings on the environment. We hear from famous authors, Indian chiefs, environmentalists, Buddhists and regular kids about their love for nature. This beautiful book brings home the frightening message that we are destroying the delicate balance that is nature and endangering Earth's survival. Amanda Vogt Rips & Raves; Sony's 'Rascal' is a lame game,1997 CHICAGO TRIBUNE, DISTRIBUTED BY KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE INC | May 28, 1998
Often when we think about preserving our planet, we think of faraway rain forests or of pandas we've never seen. Truth is, when we talk of the environment, it's easy to forget we have a role in it. The two books below, though vastly different, share a common message: Nature is a part of us, and we are a part of nature.* "There's a Hair in My Dirt! A Worm's Story," by "Far Side" creator Gary Larson ($16, HarperCollins), is an ecological fairy tale. Junior Worm is sick of being fish bait and of eating dirt.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | April 20, 2003
BEFORE I GET to today's topic ("Worms Making News"), I want to apologize to those readers, both human and elf, who were unhappy with my column on The Lord of the Rings. It turns out that my readership includes some very serious fans of the movie and the classic book by the late J.R. "Scooter" Tolkien. Many of these fans took time out from their busy schedules to write lengthy letters detailing the errors in my column, and observing that I am a stupid idiot. Here are some of the specific points they made (I am not making these points up)
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,Contributing Writer | July 16, 1993
When Dick Thompson's seventh-grade language arts students enter their West Middle School classroom this fall, they'll discover that "Jurassic Park" has taken over.Discussing the sensational movie about dinosaurs brought back life by man is Mr. Thompson's way of introducing his students to Greek mythology."Probably the biggest theme in Greek mythology is that man has certain limits and if you go beyond, you get in trouble. Like the myth of Icarus: Men should not fly," says Mr. Thompson." 'Jurassic Park' is exactly the same concept . . . as it relates to us in the 20th century.
FEATURES
By Carol Monaghan * "Anthology for the Earth," edited by Judy Allen ($22, Candlewick Press), is a poignant collection of people's writings on the environment. We hear from famous authors, Indian chiefs, environmentalists, Buddhists and regular kids about their love for nature. This beautiful book brings home the frightening message that we are destroying the delicate balance that is nature and endangering Earth's survival. Amanda Vogt Rips & Raves; Sony's 'Rascal' is a lame game and Carol Monaghan * "Anthology for the Earth," edited by Judy Allen ($22, Candlewick Press), is a poignant collection of people's writings on the environment. We hear from famous authors, Indian chiefs, environmentalists, Buddhists and regular kids about their love for nature. This beautiful book brings home the frightening message that we are destroying the delicate balance that is nature and endangering Earth's survival. Amanda Vogt Rips & Raves; Sony's 'Rascal' is a lame game,1997 CHICAGO TRIBUNE, DISTRIBUTED BY KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE INC | May 28, 1998
Often when we think about preserving our planet, we think of faraway rain forests or of pandas we've never seen. Truth is, when we talk of the environment, it's easy to forget we have a role in it. The two books below, though vastly different, share a common message: Nature is a part of us, and we are a part of nature.* "There's a Hair in My Dirt! A Worm's Story," by "Far Side" creator Gary Larson ($16, HarperCollins), is an ecological fairy tale. Junior Worm is sick of being fish bait and of eating dirt.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1996
Good morning! And what a lovely morning it is. We have something very special to tell our readers. Research shows you daily spend 4.6 minutes with the newspaper, leaving you 0.6 minutes to spend on this story. Better get to the point.This is something very special. Without further delay (the clock is ticking!) let's get to it.No, it's not a special offer of a $36 Sun sweat shirt featuring your favorite features writer. And no, The Evening Sun won't be exhumed. This is even more special.So, without further delay, dear readers, please welcome back to our pages the fabulous, the wonderful, the hilarious, the memorable, the framable, the best darn cartoon panel a quality, hometown newspaper could deliver to its readersPut that coffee down, Dad Kids, hold that homework Fido, hold that bladderLet's all welcome back"THE FAR SIDE."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 26, 1994
A lot of Halloween-themed shows appear on TV tonight, but the trick is to gravitate to the true treats: a "Far Side" special on CBS, the annual "Roseanne" Halloween bash on ABC and an Eagles concert on MTV.* "Beverly Hills, 90210" (8-9 p.m., Channel 45) -- There's a Halloween costume party as part of tonight's show, which means the young women of "Beverly Hills, 90210" will be wearing even more makeup than usual. (To quote Count Floyd: "Oooh, that's scarrry, boys and girls.") Also part of the plot, though, is a violent showdown between Dylan (Luke Perry)
NEWS
October 5, 1994
Dying's easy. Comedy's hard.We were reminded of that aphorism of the stage with the news that Gary Larson, creator of the immensely popular cartoon strip, "The Far Side," was retiring at age 44. After 15 years of the daily grind, Mr. Larson said he feared that if he continued much longer his work would "ease into the Graveyard of Mediocre Cartoons."For those not familiar with Mr. Larson's body of work, they were like any of the best newspaper funnies in that they brightened the day a bit. What made his different was that the reader often found himself wondering, "Who thinks up this stuff?"
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer Howard Henry Chen also contributed to this story | October 4, 1994
In Gary Larson's warped world, cows party on all twos, dinosaurs smoke themselves into extinction, and deer with unfortunate "bull's eye" birthmarks earn the sympathies of fellow deer.But after 15 years, Gary Larson's "Far Side" gallery will close Jan. 1. Mr. Larson, whose cartoons appear in more than 1,500 newspapers, is calling it quits.His reasons for retiring were "simple fatigue and a fear that if I continue for many more years my work will begin to suffer or at the very least ease into the Graveyard of Mediocre Cartoons," said Mr. Larson, 44, in a statement released yesterday.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,Contributing Writer | July 16, 1993
When Dick Thompson's seventh-grade language arts students enter their West Middle School classroom this fall, they'll discover that "Jurassic Park" has taken over.Discussing the sensational movie about dinosaurs brought back life by man is Mr. Thompson's way of introducing his students to Greek mythology."Probably the biggest theme in Greek mythology is that man has certain limits and if you go beyond, you get in trouble. Like the myth of Icarus: Men should not fly," says Mr. Thompson." 'Jurassic Park' is exactly the same concept . . . as it relates to us in the 20th century.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2003
The weird. The macabre. The just plain silly. For 14 years, Gary Larson's The Far Side was all that, and more. Until Larson and his single-panel comic strip came along, who knew that cows could talk, much less drink cocktails? That vultures could walk into a diner and order carrion to go? That the real reason dinosaurs are extinct is that they smoked cigarettes? For the next three months, beginning today in LIVE!, Sun readers will be able to revisit the best of The Far Side. Although Larson won't be breaking his decade-old pledge to stop drawing new panels, he's got a new collection of the old strips coming out this month.
NEWS
By Mike Lane | December 9, 1991
THE WORLD OF CHAS ADDAMS. Alfred A. Knopf. 305 pages. $30. MY FAVORITE Charles Addams cartoon depicts a woman racing across a sandy dune, chasing the shadow of what is obviously her husband being carried away by a huge bird. Hands cupped, she's shouting: "George! George! Drop the keys!"No, maybe that's not my favorite. Maybe it's the one where a poor soul is trying to end it all by sticking his head in the oven. Behind him, his landlady shouts: "Mr. Mitchell, you know you don't have kitchen privileges!"
FEATURES
By Beth Hannan 44TC and Beth Hannan 44TC,Contributing Writer | July 5, 1993
If you think you've seen these giant bugs, talking animals and other assorted odd creatures on the comics pages before, you might have.Gary Larson -- creator of "The Far Side" comic strip, which appears in The Sun and The Evening Sun -- will be on vacation this month. During that time, Universal Press Syndicate (the company that distributes Mr. Larson's work) will run "The Far Side" comic strips from 1988 as a replacement.Why strips from 1988? So that, with luck, readers won't remember them as well and they will seem fresh, says the company.
NEWS
By Mike Lane | December 9, 1991
THE WORLD OF CHAS ADDAMS. Alfred A. Knopf. 305 pages. $30. MY FAVORITE Charles Addams cartoon depicts a woman racing across a sandy dune, chasing the shadow of what is obviously her husband being carried away by a huge bird. Hands cupped, she's shouting: "George! George! Drop the keys!"No, maybe that's not my favorite. Maybe it's the one where a poor soul is trying to end it all by sticking his head in the oven. Behind him, his landlady shouts: "Mr. Mitchell, you know you don't have kitchen privileges!"
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