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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
Baltimore Sun contributor Sloane Brown was picking up lunch at Whole Foods last week when she found herself singing along to the Beach Boys song playing in the store. "So hoist up the John B's sail, see how the mainsail sets," Brown sang as she bent over the salad bar at the Harbor East store. Then she realized she wasn't the only one singing along to the Beach Boys' 1966 hit "Sloop John B. " A person on the other side of the salad bar was singing too, and he looked very familiar.
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November 23, 2013
Baltimore Sun contributor Sloane Brown was picking up lunch at Whole Foods last week when she found herself singing along to a Beach Boys song that was playing in the store. "So hoist up the John B's sail, see how the mainsail sets," sang Brown as she bent over the salad bar. "Let me go home, let me go home. I wanna go home. " Then she realized she wasn't the only one singing along to the Beach Boys' 1966 hit. A person on the other side of the salad bar was singing, too, and he looked very familiar.
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By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,Sun Staff Writer | September 6, 1994
Gary Adrian Cole, an interior designer with his own design firm for 20 years, died Saturday at Sinai Hospital of pneumonia brought on by AIDS. The Parkton resident was 52 years old.Mr. Cole had operated Gary Cole Interiors since 1973 and had managed The Warehouse in South Baltimore for two years.Known for his eclectic style, the South Baltimore native had clients in Washington, New York and Florida, and in 1990 he decorated a house owned by Robert Redford in Santa Domingo."He captivated his clients," said Bradley Permenter, 29, Mr. Cole's companion for 2 1/2 years.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 12, 2002
The networks' new fall television season begins tonight with the premiere of Family Affair on WB. It's an ill-conceived, lifeless and sorry show, which makes it the perfect launching pad for a largely unimaginative, limp and lame lineup of new network series. Reminding us that there is nothing so rare as an original idea in network prime-time programming, Family Affair is a remake of a series that ran on CBS from 1966 to 1971 and was no great shakes the first time around. The original, though, did at least have a bit of resonance with the larger culture, something the producers seem not to have understood at all in their ham-handed, copycat update.
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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1996
So good they're bad, the Bradys are back, in all their polyester and eerie smiles, and the result is so bad it's good."A Very Brady Sequel" continues in the vein of "The Brady Bunch Movie," taking the '70s sitcom family and keeping them happily in a '70s mode while the rest of the world is drinking iced mochas, wearing Rachel haircuts and generally being greedy dirt-bags.The greedy dirt-bag this time around is Tim Matheson, who shows up at the Bradys' door claiming to be Mrs. Brady's (Shelley Long)
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 12, 2002
The networks' new fall television season begins tonight with the premiere of Family Affair on WB. It's an ill-conceived, lifeless and sorry show, which makes it the perfect launching pad for a largely unimaginative, limp and lame lineup of new network series. Reminding us that there is nothing so rare as an original idea in network prime-time programming, Family Affair is a remake of a series that ran on CBS from 1966 to 1971 and was no great shakes the first time around. The original, though, did at least have a bit of resonance with the larger culture, something the producers seem not to have understood at all in their ham-handed, copycat update.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 17, 1996
How did the United States become so entangled in Vietnam that the war there dominated the lives of an entire generation? What's in store for Marylanders in 1996? Why did an actress like Faye Dunaway agree to star in a movie like "Mommie Dearest"? And if "Party of Five" is so good, why isn't anyone watching it? TV offers answers to some vexing questions tonight.* "State of the State Address" (noon-1 p.m., repeats 10:30 p.m.-11:30 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Gov. Parris Glendening offers his take on how the Free State is faring.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 30, 2002
Robin Williams is so creepy in One Hour Photo, and first-time writer-director Mark Romanek does such a nice job of calibrating his film's squirm factor, it's possible to overlook some flaws that would sink a lesser film. The truth is, there's a certain disconnectedness to the movie, a sense, even after it's all over, that we haven't been let in on everything. And there's a definite full-tilt loonie factor built into the ending, as Williams' character lets it all go in a rush of psychotic fury that's as off-putting as it is riveting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Kronke and David Kronke,Special to The Sun | February 17, 1995
Los Angeles -- There are certain comebacks that make sense and are even, in some cases, well-deserved: Tony Bennett's jazzy pop. Jim Thompson's hard-nosed pulp novels. Thigh-high stockings.And then there are those inexplicable returns from oblivion, the shifts in our cultural bedrock as difficult to predict or explain as the seismic tremors that routinely jolt Hollywood, the birthplace of much bizarro phenomena.Which brings us to "The Brady Bunch," the legendarily dumb sitcom that ran from 1969 to the mid-'70s, and cropped up sporadically as TV movies and mercifully short-lived sequel series.
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September 20, 2007
73 Sophia Loren Actress 56 Guy LaFleur Hockey Player 51 Gary Cole Actor 40 Kristen Johnson Actress 25 Yung Joc Rapper
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 30, 2002
Robin Williams is so creepy in One Hour Photo, and first-time writer-director Mark Romanek does such a nice job of calibrating his film's squirm factor, it's possible to overlook some flaws that would sink a lesser film. The truth is, there's a certain disconnectedness to the movie, a sense, even after it's all over, that we haven't been let in on everything. And there's a definite full-tilt loonie factor built into the ending, as Williams' character lets it all go in a rush of psychotic fury that's as off-putting as it is riveting.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1996
So good they're bad, the Bradys are back, in all their polyester and eerie smiles, and the result is so bad it's good."A Very Brady Sequel" continues in the vein of "The Brady Bunch Movie," taking the '70s sitcom family and keeping them happily in a '70s mode while the rest of the world is drinking iced mochas, wearing Rachel haircuts and generally being greedy dirt-bags.The greedy dirt-bag this time around is Tim Matheson, who shows up at the Bradys' door claiming to be Mrs. Brady's (Shelley Long)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 17, 1996
How did the United States become so entangled in Vietnam that the war there dominated the lives of an entire generation? What's in store for Marylanders in 1996? Why did an actress like Faye Dunaway agree to star in a movie like "Mommie Dearest"? And if "Party of Five" is so good, why isn't anyone watching it? TV offers answers to some vexing questions tonight.* "State of the State Address" (noon-1 p.m., repeats 10:30 p.m.-11:30 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Gov. Parris Glendening offers his take on how the Free State is faring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Kronke and David Kronke,Special to The Sun | February 17, 1995
Los Angeles -- There are certain comebacks that make sense and are even, in some cases, well-deserved: Tony Bennett's jazzy pop. Jim Thompson's hard-nosed pulp novels. Thigh-high stockings.And then there are those inexplicable returns from oblivion, the shifts in our cultural bedrock as difficult to predict or explain as the seismic tremors that routinely jolt Hollywood, the birthplace of much bizarro phenomena.Which brings us to "The Brady Bunch," the legendarily dumb sitcom that ran from 1969 to the mid-'70s, and cropped up sporadically as TV movies and mercifully short-lived sequel series.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,Sun Staff Writer | September 6, 1994
Gary Adrian Cole, an interior designer with his own design firm for 20 years, died Saturday at Sinai Hospital of pneumonia brought on by AIDS. The Parkton resident was 52 years old.Mr. Cole had operated Gary Cole Interiors since 1973 and had managed The Warehouse in South Baltimore for two years.Known for his eclectic style, the South Baltimore native had clients in Washington, New York and Florida, and in 1990 he decorated a house owned by Robert Redford in Santa Domingo."He captivated his clients," said Bradley Permenter, 29, Mr. Cole's companion for 2 1/2 years.
NEWS
June 2, 2004
On May 28, 2004 EDNA V. (DOT) of Reisterstown; beloved wife of August S. (Gus) Unkart and mother of Gary L. Cole, Dawn D., Steve S., Mark A. and Robert E. Unkart and the late Edward E. Cole. Also survived by 11 grandchildren and two great grandchildren, four brothers and four sisters. Services from the ELINE FUNERAL HOME, 11824 Reisterstown Rd., (at Franklin Blvd.) Friday 11 A.M. Interment in Lakeview Memorial Park. Friends may call Thursday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M.
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