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By Michael Pakenham | December 1, 2002
Mr. Jefferson's University, by Garry Wills. National Geographic Books, 184 pages, $20. President Jefferson wrote his own epitaph, which are the only words on his tomb: "Here was Buried / Thomas Jefferson / Author of the / Declaration / of American Independence / of the / Statute of Virginia / for / Religious Freedom / and Father of the / University of Virginia." He founded that university, at great personal sacrifice, but he also designed its original core of buildings -- which a poll of professionals by the American Institute of Architects designated as "the proudest achievement in American architecture."
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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  FLORILEGIUM Florilegium  (pronounced flor-uh-LEE-jee-um) is one of those gather-ye-rosebuds words. From the Latin flos , floris , "flower," plus legere , "gather. " It indicates a gathering or collection of brief extracts or writing.  It is thus a fancy word for "anthology," though the emphasis is on short items rather than a bulky compendium.  Example: Garry Wills, who thought Daniel Patrick Moynihan a poseur, says this in an article collected in Lead Time (2004)
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NEWS
By Dorothea Straus and Dorothea Straus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 22, 1996
"John Wayne's America: The Politics of Celebrity," by Garry Wills. Simon and Schuster. 289 pages. $26.This latest book by Garry Wills, like many of the author's other works, is unclassifiable. It is at once history, sociology, a chronicle of Hollywood films and the life of an actor - all of these, and none of them. It might be considered the biography of an idea.While Abraham Lincoln rallied the nation around the eloquence of his Gettysburg Address, Garry Wills suggests that John Wayne became an American icon, due in part, to his inarticulateness.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | September 30, 2007
Head and Heart: American Christianities By Garry Wills The Penguin Press / 552 pages/ $25.95 Religion in America, according to Garry Wills, has oscillated between "two tendencies, two temperaments." In the 18th century, Enlightenment religious culture embraced reason, benevolence, tolerance and pluralism. Its core value, the separation of church and state, was enshrined in the United States Constitution. Enlightenment religion was a radical departure from Evangelicalism, which emphasizes faith, biblical truth, and an experiential relationship to Christ.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  FLORILEGIUM Florilegium  (pronounced flor-uh-LEE-jee-um) is one of those gather-ye-rosebuds words. From the Latin flos , floris , "flower," plus legere , "gather. " It indicates a gathering or collection of brief extracts or writing.  It is thus a fancy word for "anthology," though the emphasis is on short items rather than a bulky compendium.  Example: Garry Wills, who thought Daniel Patrick Moynihan a poseur, says this in an article collected in Lead Time (2004)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Jenkins and Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | October 26, 2003
Negro President: Jefferson and the Slave Power, by Garry Wills. Houghton Mifflin. 256 pages. $25. Ordinarily the design of a book's dust jacket carries little significance, but this is an exception. The titillating title, Negro President, cries out over a portrait of Thomas Jefferson looking a bit like a fugitive from justice. The reader's first reaction might understandably be to ask, Could there be an African lurking in the third president's ancestry? Or does the title imply that we are getting a new expose of Jefferson's furtive coupling with his slave Sally Hemings?
NEWS
By Bruce Clayton | July 5, 1992
LINCOLN AT GETTYSBURG: THE WORDS THAT REMADE AMERICA.Garry Wills.Simon & Schuster.317 pages. $23. Stacks of empty coffins greeted President Abraham Lincoln as he stepped from his train at Gettysburg, Pa., in the dusk, on Nov. 18, 1863. The next day, he was to make a few brief "remarks" to help commemorate the still-unfinished cemetery, where Union soldiers who had perished earlier in those three ghastly days in July were to be reburied.The featured speaker was the celebrated Edward Everett, whose two- and three-hour Olympian addresses had sanctified Concord, Lexington and Bunker Hill.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | September 30, 2007
Head and Heart: American Christianities By Garry Wills The Penguin Press / 552 pages/ $25.95 Religion in America, according to Garry Wills, has oscillated between "two tendencies, two temperaments." In the 18th century, Enlightenment religious culture embraced reason, benevolence, tolerance and pluralism. Its core value, the separation of church and state, was enshrined in the United States Constitution. Enlightenment religion was a radical departure from Evangelicalism, which emphasizes faith, biblical truth, and an experiential relationship to Christ.
NEWS
By Don Wycliff and Don Wycliff,Chicago Tribune | January 7, 2007
What Paul Meant Garry Wills Viking / 193 pages / $24.95 Everybody should be as lucky as St. Paul. Not only did he have a transformative spiritual experience and become a founder of one of the world's great religions, but 2,000 years later he has Garry Wills to explain, interpret and defend him. He needs defending because Paul is widely thought to have taken the liberating message of Jesus, turned it inside out and made it into a kind of moral and...
NEWS
February 15, 1992
Failed PolicyEditor: General Motors, once the world's automotive giant, suffers record-breaking losses. R. H. Macy, the nation's greatest department store, goes bankrupt. IBM, once looked upon as the model of a successful and well-managed business enterprise, loses money for the first time in its history.Every day, hundreds of businesses file for bankruptcy or downsize, throwing more people out of work.The national debt is so huge we may not be able to afford the funding necessary for programs to provide a safety net for the poor or to help the middle class survive.
NEWS
By Don Wycliff and Don Wycliff,Chicago Tribune | January 7, 2007
What Paul Meant Garry Wills Viking / 193 pages / $24.95 Everybody should be as lucky as St. Paul. Not only did he have a transformative spiritual experience and become a founder of one of the world's great religions, but 2,000 years later he has Garry Wills to explain, interpret and defend him. He needs defending because Paul is widely thought to have taken the liberating message of Jesus, turned it inside out and made it into a kind of moral and...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Jenkins and Ray Jenkins,Special to the Sun | October 26, 2003
Negro President: Jefferson and the Slave Power, by Garry Wills. Houghton Mifflin. 256 pages. $25. Ordinarily the design of a book's dust jacket carries little significance, but this is an exception. The titillating title, Negro President, cries out over a portrait of Thomas Jefferson looking a bit like a fugitive from justice. The reader's first reaction might understandably be to ask, Could there be an African lurking in the third president's ancestry? Or does the title imply that we are getting a new expose of Jefferson's furtive coupling with his slave Sally Hemings?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | December 1, 2002
Mr. Jefferson's University, by Garry Wills. National Geographic Books, 184 pages, $20. President Jefferson wrote his own epitaph, which are the only words on his tomb: "Here was Buried / Thomas Jefferson / Author of the / Declaration / of American Independence / of the / Statute of Virginia / for / Religious Freedom / and Father of the / University of Virginia." He founded that university, at great personal sacrifice, but he also designed its original core of buildings -- which a poll of professionals by the American Institute of Architects designated as "the proudest achievement in American architecture."
NEWS
By Dorothea Straus and Dorothea Straus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 22, 1996
"John Wayne's America: The Politics of Celebrity," by Garry Wills. Simon and Schuster. 289 pages. $26.This latest book by Garry Wills, like many of the author's other works, is unclassifiable. It is at once history, sociology, a chronicle of Hollywood films and the life of an actor - all of these, and none of them. It might be considered the biography of an idea.While Abraham Lincoln rallied the nation around the eloquence of his Gettysburg Address, Garry Wills suggests that John Wayne became an American icon, due in part, to his inarticulateness.
NEWS
By Bruce Clayton | July 5, 1992
LINCOLN AT GETTYSBURG: THE WORDS THAT REMADE AMERICA.Garry Wills.Simon & Schuster.317 pages. $23. Stacks of empty coffins greeted President Abraham Lincoln as he stepped from his train at Gettysburg, Pa., in the dusk, on Nov. 18, 1863. The next day, he was to make a few brief "remarks" to help commemorate the still-unfinished cemetery, where Union soldiers who had perished earlier in those three ghastly days in July were to be reburied.The featured speaker was the celebrated Edward Everett, whose two- and three-hour Olympian addresses had sanctified Concord, Lexington and Bunker Hill.
NEWS
February 15, 1992
Failed PolicyEditor: General Motors, once the world's automotive giant, suffers record-breaking losses. R. H. Macy, the nation's greatest department store, goes bankrupt. IBM, once looked upon as the model of a successful and well-managed business enterprise, loses money for the first time in its history.Every day, hundreds of businesses file for bankruptcy or downsize, throwing more people out of work.The national debt is so huge we may not be able to afford the funding necessary for programs to provide a safety net for the poor or to help the middle class survive.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 20, 1991
"Making Sense of the Sixties" is six hours of television that is short on memory and devoid of any real vision. That can make for frustrating viewing -- a long trip via the television set that ultimately takes you almost nowhere in terms of understanding the 1960s or the demographic bulge known as baby boomers, which entered early adulthood then and has dominated American popular culture ever since.But that doesn't mean "Making Sense of the Sixties," which begins at 9 tomorrow on MPT (Channels 22 and 67)
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | March 1, 1993
"All the Pretty Horses," Cormac McCarthy's haunting novel of the West, has captured its second major literary prize by winning the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction. The awards were announced today by the National Book Critics Circle, an organization of book critics and editors.In November, Mr. McCarthy's book won the National Book Award, which is considered second in prestige among American literary awards, behind the Pulitzer Prize. The book critics' award is generally considered more "mainstream" than the National Book Award, which in recent years often has gone to lesser-known writers.
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