Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGarry Trudeau
IN THE NEWS

Garry Trudeau

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Stossel and Scott Stossel,Special to the Sun | March 7, 2004
Among the many rareified accomplishments to which the cartoonist Garry Trudeau can lay claim -- a Pulitzer Prize, an Academy Award, a cartoon strip that runs in more than 1,400 newspapers, a 20-year marriage to Jane Pauley -- perhaps the most revealing is this one: Trudeau is surely the only person to have had one of his books prefaced with an essay by the arch-conservative William F. Buckley Jr. (Doonesbury's Greatest Hits: A Mid-Seventies Revue, Holt,...
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
If you don't think TV is in the midst of revolutionary change, go to Amazon.com this weekend and instead of buying a book or baby food, take a look at the online giant's original production of "Alpha House. " It's a political satire written and produced by "Doonesbury" creator Garry Trudeau starring John Goodman and Clark Johnson. It's set in a house on Capitol Hill that four Republican members of the U.S. Senate share, and the first three episodes can be streamed for free this week.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2004
There was nothing funny about Doonesbury last Sunday. The names of 700 American soldiers killed in Iraq filled six panels of the comic strip - a somber roll call of the fallen in a section of the newspaper where we also learned Cathy was having trouble fitting into her bathing suit and Garfield's owner has a lousy love life. But while the strip may have been out of place on the funnies page, it was not out of character for Doonesbury, which has always pushed the boundaries of what comics can be to make readers think before they laugh.
NEWS
March 18, 2012
The Sun owes an apology to its readers for publishing Garry Trudeau's idiotic attempt at being funny in his "Doonesbury" comic strip on state abortion laws. It was a jab at all those who have some morals and religious convictions, no matter what their political views. It would have been better for you to have published the comments of Howard Stern. You are getting pretty hard to take with your biased, one-sided view of current events. Check out your own What Maryland Thinks polls, where 90 percent of the time readers disagree with you. John Rutkowski, Rock Hall
NEWS
March 18, 2012
The Sun owes an apology to its readers for publishing Garry Trudeau's idiotic attempt at being funny in his "Doonesbury" comic strip on state abortion laws. It was a jab at all those who have some morals and religious convictions, no matter what their political views. It would have been better for you to have published the comments of Howard Stern. You are getting pretty hard to take with your biased, one-sided view of current events. Check out your own What Maryland Thinks polls, where 90 percent of the time readers disagree with you. John Rutkowski, Rock Hall
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | February 4, 1997
IF YOU ARE raising a teen-age daughter, you know how painful it is for her when she is noticed.She would trade a closet full of her favorite outfits for the cloak of invisibility. She lives life feeling like everyone is staring at her and her psyche burns under the X-ray vision of a million pairs of eyes.But this awful self-consciousness passes -- to the great relief of teen-age girls and the mothers who suffer with them -- and it appears to have passed for Chelsea Clinton.Somehow, the First Teen-ager found the courage to walk down Pennsylvania Avenue -- in a mini-skirt and high heels, no less -- during her father's second inauguration.
NEWS
March 12, 2012
Doonesbury fans may have a hard time finding their favorite strip this week, as some newspapers shy away from Garry Trudeau's hard-edged lampooning of a Texas abortion law. In a week-long series , Trudeau takes direct aim at the law, which requires women to have an ultrasound procedure before an abortion. For some papers, phrases such as "slut" and "10-inch shaming wand" were a bit too hard to take. The harshest bit of dialogue may be the day-four bit comparing a transvaginal sonogram to rape.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | February 28, 1996
New sorbets make debuts"Yummy" was our tasters' response to six new sorbet flavors from Ben & Jerry's. You can get free samples of flavors such as Strawberry Kiwi, Purple Passion Fruit, Pina Colada, Pink Lemonade, Mocha and Doonesberry -- with carton illustrated by cartoonist Garry Trudeau -- at Ben & Jerry's Scoop shops; cartons will be in stores next month. Award-winning Boston restaurant chef Lydia Shire will be behind the stove at Linwood's/Due restaurants Tuesday night for the 5th annual Great Chef's Dinner to benefit the Child Abuse Prevention Center of Maryland.
NEWS
By NORMAN SOLOMON | November 16, 1991
In recent days a lot of ink and air time have been devoted to denouncing Garry Trudeau's current ''Doonesbury'' episode. Perhaps the harshest words came from Newsweek's Jonathan Alter, who opined that Mr. Trudeau ''found himself cast in the unlikely mold of Alan Simpson at the Anita Hill hearings -- spreading personal innuendo.''Comparing a man to the junior senator from Wyoming is ultimate nastiness.The mainstream media heavies cluck that Mr. Trudeau is publicizing a discredited charge that Vice President Quayle purchased cocaine a decade ago. But the media have managed to miss a key point.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | October 29, 1994
When you pick up the comics, you expect political commentary from "Doonesbury," which over the years has depicted Richard Nixon as "guilty, guilty, guilty"; Dan Quayle as, literally, an intellectual featherweight; and most recently, Oliver North as a paranoid nut wrapped in a Confederate flag.But "Sibling Revelry"? That rather childishly drawn strip in which a little boy named Stew and his big sister Lori usually quip about juvenile subjects like boogers, baseball and bullies?Lately, though, the strip's jokes have been on more adult fare -- President Clinton's problems, real or alleged, with marital fidelity, foreign policy and health care reform.
NEWS
March 12, 2012
Doonesbury fans may have a hard time finding their favorite strip this week, as some newspapers shy away from Garry Trudeau's hard-edged lampooning of a Texas abortion law. In a week-long series , Trudeau takes direct aim at the law, which requires women to have an ultrasound procedure before an abortion. For some papers, phrases such as "slut" and "10-inch shaming wand" were a bit too hard to take. The harshest bit of dialogue may be the day-four bit comparing a transvaginal sonogram to rape.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2004
There was nothing funny about Doonesbury last Sunday. The names of 700 American soldiers killed in Iraq filled six panels of the comic strip - a somber roll call of the fallen in a section of the newspaper where we also learned Cathy was having trouble fitting into her bathing suit and Garfield's owner has a lousy love life. But while the strip may have been out of place on the funnies page, it was not out of character for Doonesbury, which has always pushed the boundaries of what comics can be to make readers think before they laugh.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Stossel and Scott Stossel,Special to the Sun | March 7, 2004
Among the many rareified accomplishments to which the cartoonist Garry Trudeau can lay claim -- a Pulitzer Prize, an Academy Award, a cartoon strip that runs in more than 1,400 newspapers, a 20-year marriage to Jane Pauley -- perhaps the most revealing is this one: Trudeau is surely the only person to have had one of his books prefaced with an essay by the arch-conservative William F. Buckley Jr. (Doonesbury's Greatest Hits: A Mid-Seventies Revue, Holt,...
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | February 4, 1997
IF YOU ARE raising a teen-age daughter, you know how painful it is for her when she is noticed.She would trade a closet full of her favorite outfits for the cloak of invisibility. She lives life feeling like everyone is staring at her and her psyche burns under the X-ray vision of a million pairs of eyes.But this awful self-consciousness passes -- to the great relief of teen-age girls and the mothers who suffer with them -- and it appears to have passed for Chelsea Clinton.Somehow, the First Teen-ager found the courage to walk down Pennsylvania Avenue -- in a mini-skirt and high heels, no less -- during her father's second inauguration.
FEATURES
By Mike Littwin | June 5, 1996
IT'S ONLY Life magazine, I keep telling myself. But if you're a baby boomer, and chances are good that you are, you may find the current Life cover story more than a little disturbing.What Life has done is compile a list of the 50 most influential boomers -- derived from those 76 million Americans born between 1946 and 1964.The list is frightening. And not just because scare-master Stephen King is ranked No. 30. What's scary is that he's the only novelist on the list. What's scarier still is that it's hard to think of an American novelist currently under the age of 50 who actually belongs on the list.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | February 28, 1996
New sorbets make debuts"Yummy" was our tasters' response to six new sorbet flavors from Ben & Jerry's. You can get free samples of flavors such as Strawberry Kiwi, Purple Passion Fruit, Pina Colada, Pink Lemonade, Mocha and Doonesberry -- with carton illustrated by cartoonist Garry Trudeau -- at Ben & Jerry's Scoop shops; cartons will be in stores next month. Award-winning Boston restaurant chef Lydia Shire will be behind the stove at Linwood's/Due restaurants Tuesday night for the 5th annual Great Chef's Dinner to benefit the Child Abuse Prevention Center of Maryland.
FEATURES
By Mike Littwin | June 5, 1996
IT'S ONLY Life magazine, I keep telling myself. But if you're a baby boomer, and chances are good that you are, you may find the current Life cover story more than a little disturbing.What Life has done is compile a list of the 50 most influential boomers -- derived from those 76 million Americans born between 1946 and 1964.The list is frightening. And not just because scare-master Stephen King is ranked No. 30. What's scary is that he's the only novelist on the list. What's scarier still is that it's hard to think of an American novelist currently under the age of 50 who actually belongs on the list.
NEWS
By JEFFREY M. LANDAW and JEFFREY M. LANDAW,Jeffrey Landaw is a makeup editor for The Sun | May 3, 1992
Can you think of any male role models in preschools?" my wife asked.I had caught bits of "Kindergarten Cop" on television the night before while baby Judith decided whether to sleep, eat, teethe or bewail the rate of entropy in the universe."Arnold Schwarzenegger?"Neither of us could come up with any better names on the spot; Mr. Rogers and the male characters on "Sesame Street" don't really count. Maybe I'm not the person to look for role models, though, because the phrase sets my teeth on edge.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | October 29, 1994
When you pick up the comics, you expect political commentary from "Doonesbury," which over the years has depicted Richard Nixon as "guilty, guilty, guilty"; Dan Quayle as, literally, an intellectual featherweight; and most recently, Oliver North as a paranoid nut wrapped in a Confederate flag.But "Sibling Revelry"? That rather childishly drawn strip in which a little boy named Stew and his big sister Lori usually quip about juvenile subjects like boogers, baseball and bullies?Lately, though, the strip's jokes have been on more adult fare -- President Clinton's problems, real or alleged, with marital fidelity, foreign policy and health care reform.
NEWS
By JEFFREY M. LANDAW and JEFFREY M. LANDAW,Jeffrey Landaw is a makeup editor for The Sun | May 3, 1992
Can you think of any male role models in preschools?" my wife asked.I had caught bits of "Kindergarten Cop" on television the night before while baby Judith decided whether to sleep, eat, teethe or bewail the rate of entropy in the universe."Arnold Schwarzenegger?"Neither of us could come up with any better names on the spot; Mr. Rogers and the male characters on "Sesame Street" don't really count. Maybe I'm not the person to look for role models, though, because the phrase sets my teeth on edge.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.