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Garry Shandling

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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | October 12, 1994
If you made the mistake of watching Fox's "Roseanne: An Unauthorized Biography" last night, you've got two chances to watch the real Roseanne tonight and get the taste of Denny Dillon's hideously bad portrayal out of your mouth. There's also an unofficial reunion on TV tonight, with Bill Cosby and Phylicia Rashad appearing on separate shows, and an official one, with Robert Plant and Jimmy Page, formerly of Led Zeppelin, doing an "Unledded" concert on MTV.* "The Cosby Mysteries" (8-9 p.m., Channel 2)
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | March 25, 1995
Baltimore may be of big city size, but it's still pretty small-town in attitude, as shown by a "gee-whiz" local hour on WBAL-TV about the making of movies in and around Charm City. Viewers will learn some interesting things -- but not, as some studio audience members discover, how to break into films.* "Special Edition: Maryland's Hollywood Connection" (7 p.m.-8 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Host Ron Shapiro interviews, and a few studio guests get to question, four Maryland residents involved behind-the-scenes in the recent surge of production in town: producer James Robinson, writer Norman Steinberg, casting director Pat Moran and "Homicide" executive producer Henry Bromell.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | December 7, 1994
The odds against it happening are very high, but tonight TV provides a sort of holiday miracle: two watchable Christmas specials on the same night. One is from 1965 -- and that's the newer one. The other, seen for the first time since it was performed live on the DuMont network, is from 1951.* "A Charlie Brown Christmas" (8-8:30 p.m., Channel 11) -- Vince Guaraldi's jazz score is terrific. Linus' lecture about the true meaning of Christmas is right on the money -- and right about the money, too. Then there's the Snoopy dance, seen in animated form for the first time -- and that scrawny Christmas tree, which Charlie Brown identifies with for all the right reasons.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | July 27, 1994
Peter Jennings devotes a prime-time hour tonight to the Haitian crisis -- which, with the way things are going in Rwanda, puts him one crisis behind. The real world is moving almost too quickly to keep up, but the world of television, tonight at least, is less active. In fact, except for a few scattered highlights, tonight's TV world is flat.* "Beverly Hills, 90210" (8-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- This episode from 1992 is one of several "90210" installments from this era featuring a now-familiar face: guest star Dean Cain, now starring in ABC's "Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman."
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March 3, 2000
A breezy yet diamond-hard humor runs through "What Planet Are You From?," a bawdy, brainy sex comedy geared toward smart people with a sophomoric streak. At its goofiest and gaggiest, this fish-out-of-water yarn, about a space alien who finds true love while trying to take over the world, will remind viewers of Mel Brooks. At its crudest, it recalls "There's Something About Mary." But at its wisest -- and it is surprisingly wise, in the end -- "What Planet Are You From?" evokes fond memories of director Mike Nichols and his former partner, Elaine May, who together shed a wry, cleansing light on the human condition by way of gently lethal satire.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 10, 2000
Think of it as a giant pep rally on the eve of the big game. Only this year, there's no big game. Traditionally, the Emmy Awards telecast announced the start of network premiere week and the new fall season. The television industry understood synergy before synergy was cool. But this year, for the first time in network history, there is no premiere week, and the new fall series won't start arriving until October after the summer Olympics have run their course on NBC. The fall season is still flying well below most viewers' radar despite the networks' endless on-air promotion.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 27, 2001
Once again, the giant Hollywood star machine has labored mightily and coughed up a mouse - or at best, Warren Beatty in a polar bear suit. He's cute in the suit, like a baggy-pants version of the polar bears in the yuletide Coca-Cola commercials. He should have played the whole picture that way. For Beatty doesn't have a naturally engaging comic spirit. He didn't in those duds everyone has forgotten, like "The Fortune," or in the one no one will forget, "Ishtar," or even in his fading-from-memory hit, "Heaven Can Wait."
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By From Sun news services | November 29, 2008
One Bond about another: He's 'marvelous' as 007 Roger Moore told reporters in Hong Kong on Thursday that Daniel Craig is "marvelous" as James Bond because he brings a fresh dimension to the character. Moore, 81, who starred in seven Bond films in the 1970s and the 1980s, said Craig's performances in Steven Spielberg's 2005 political thriller Munich and Sylvia in 2003 helped shape a new Bond. Moore, speaking at an event in Hong Kong to promote his autobiography My Word Is My Bond, said he had yet to see Craig in Quantum of Solace.
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By Steve McKerrow | June 6, 1991
ON THE WEEKEND WATCH:MORE DEAD SHOWS -- Into the summer rerun season, the networks are offering what will perhaps be last-chance viewings of series from the long list of canceled fare. Just tonight, for example, ABC (Channel 13) has moved "Gabriel's Fire" to 9 o'clock (although star James Earl Jones is coming back in the fall as the same character in a new show, "Bird and Katt"). And CBS (Channel 11) has two returns, the mid-season replacement about a Cajun cop, "Broken Badges" at 9, and Edward Woodward's rather likable "Over My Dead Body" at 10. Note also that CBS on Sunday (10 p.m.)
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 28, 1994
Has your Olympic fever receded yet? It's back to basics, back to business as usual -- and back to the business of paying attention to other things, including a stellar syzygy in the late-night talk-show firmament.* "Evening Shade" (8-8:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Returning to prime-time regularity, CBS begins with an "Evening Shade" showcasing guest stars Tammy Wynette and K. T. Oslin, who play singing sisters of Merleen (Ann Wedgeworth). CBS.* "Nova: 'In Search of Human Origins' " (8-9 p.m., WMPT, channels 22 and 67)
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