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Garry Moore

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By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Staff Writer | November 29, 1993
Garry Moore had a secret: As a child, he liked to shadow the lamplighter around his Bolton Hill neighborhood, shinny up the posts and snuff out the flames.That humor would serve him well in later years as a popular radio and television personality: He was host of four network TV shows in the medium's early years and also won an Emmy.Garry Moore died yesterday, of emphysema, at his home on Hilton Head Island, S.C. He was 78.It was on his last visit to Baltimore six years ago that Mr. Moore -- born in Baltimore as Thomas Garrison Morfit -- told the truth about some of the adolescent high jinks that helped shape his career as a comedian.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2005
Garry Moore Jr., an amputee since a 1997 accident crushed his left foot, leans against a chain-link fence in Carroll Park. Two children walk up behind him to sneak a peek at his prosthetic limb, a hunk of metal attached just below his left knee. Later, those same kids and others watch in amazement as Moore cruises around a half-pipe on a skateboard, turning moves such as front five-O and 50-50 grinds. In a sport that requires ankle control to make subtle moves and balance the body on the board, Moore not only can ride -- he can rip. "How's the foot stay in place?"
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FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1998
To most Americans watching television in the 1950s and 1960s, he was known as Garry Moore -- the eternally youthful guy with the wick-wire crew cut and inch-wide bow ties. But to Baltimoreans, he was still Garrison Morfit, the kid who grew up in Bolton Hill, attended City College and McDonogh School, and began his show-business career here on WBAL radio.Known as the city's second best-loved crew cut, right behind Colt legend Johnny Unitas, Moore later became the host of two network quiz shows, "I've Got A Secret" and "To Tell The Truth."
NEWS
March 17, 2000
Thomas Wilson Ferebee, 81, the bombardier who dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima in World War II, died Thursday in Windermere, Fla. He was 26 on Aug. 6, 1945, a major and a veteran of 64 missions when the B-29 Enola Gay took off for Japan with the first nuclear weapon ever deployed. Mr. Ferebee, who retired from the Air Force as a colonel in 1970, said he never felt guilty but was sorry the bomb killed so many. "I'm sorry an awful lot of people died from that bomb, and I hate to think that something like that had to happen to end the war," he said in a 1995 interview on the 50th anniversary of the bombing.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2005
Garry Moore Jr., an amputee since a 1997 accident crushed his left foot, leans against a chain-link fence in Carroll Park. Two children walk up behind him to sneak a peek at his prosthetic limb, a hunk of metal attached just below his left knee. Later, those same kids and others watch in amazement as Moore cruises around a half-pipe on a skateboard, turning moves such as front five-O and 50-50 grinds. In a sport that requires ankle control to make subtle moves and balance the body on the board, Moore not only can ride -- he can rip. "How's the foot stay in place?"
NEWS
By BENNARD B. PERLMAN | December 1, 1993
The recent death of Baltimore radio and TV personality Garry Moore caused me to recall our initial meeting. It was 1947 and, having completed my sophomore year in college, I was traveling the country during summer vacation. Eating lunch in the NBC commissary in Hollywood, I glanced out the window and observed a strange message on the marquee: ''Garry Moore in 'Take It Or Leave It' Tonight.''Now everyone knew that the emcee of that top-rated radio show was Phil Baker, so I sauntered over to the box office where free tickets were dispensed to inform someone of the error.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | November 21, 1992
Who says the musical variety show is extinct on television? Certainly not Harold and Don Reid, Phil Balsley or Jimmy Fortune.Who?You're no fan of cable TV's "The Statler Brothers Show" if you cannot identify those four singer/musicians, whose variety show begins a second season tonight on the Nashville Network. Randy Travis appears as the guest star.The basic-service network says the hourlong program, at 9 p.m. Saturdays, is the most popular on TNN (carried by most cable systems in this area)
NEWS
March 17, 2000
Thomas Wilson Ferebee, 81, the bombardier who dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima in World War II, died Thursday in Windermere, Fla. He was 26 on Aug. 6, 1945, a major and a veteran of 64 missions when the B-29 Enola Gay took off for Japan with the first nuclear weapon ever deployed. Mr. Ferebee, who retired from the Air Force as a colonel in 1970, said he never felt guilty but was sorry the bomb killed so many. "I'm sorry an awful lot of people died from that bomb, and I hate to think that something like that had to happen to end the war," he said in a 1995 interview on the 50th anniversary of the bombing.
NEWS
January 13, 1994
In his intriguing causerie, ''Eversharp,'' Bennard B. Perlman (Opinion * Commentary, Dec. 1) reminisces on his meeting, on a visit to Hollywood in 1947, with Garry Moore, the noted variety show host. (The famous entertainer recently died at 78.)I'm reminded of my brief encounter, in the middle 1930s, with the future star whose trademarks were the crew cut and the bow tie. Among other duties, he led a series of amateur shows on Baltimore radio; winners were determined not by judges but by the largest number of postcards, or ''votes,'' sent in by listeners.
NEWS
December 17, 1993
Not JusticeOnce again, The Sun comes out against capital punishment (Dec. 6). While it is true that the state of Maryland has had capital punishment on the books for several years, there have been no actual executions in over 30 years, thus we have, de facto, no capital punishment.The Maryland Court of Appeals, the ACLU and others have conspired to thwart the will of the citizens and the Maryland General Assembly and prevent justice from being served by blocking and delaying every single execution for years.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1998
To most Americans watching television in the 1950s and 1960s, he was known as Garry Moore -- the eternally youthful guy with the wick-wire crew cut and inch-wide bow ties. But to Baltimoreans, he was still Garrison Morfit, the kid who grew up in Bolton Hill, attended City College and McDonogh School, and began his show-business career here on WBAL radio.Known as the city's second best-loved crew cut, right behind Colt legend Johnny Unitas, Moore later became the host of two network quiz shows, "I've Got A Secret" and "To Tell The Truth."
NEWS
January 13, 1994
In his intriguing causerie, ''Eversharp,'' Bennard B. Perlman (Opinion * Commentary, Dec. 1) reminisces on his meeting, on a visit to Hollywood in 1947, with Garry Moore, the noted variety show host. (The famous entertainer recently died at 78.)I'm reminded of my brief encounter, in the middle 1930s, with the future star whose trademarks were the crew cut and the bow tie. Among other duties, he led a series of amateur shows on Baltimore radio; winners were determined not by judges but by the largest number of postcards, or ''votes,'' sent in by listeners.
NEWS
December 17, 1993
Not JusticeOnce again, The Sun comes out against capital punishment (Dec. 6). While it is true that the state of Maryland has had capital punishment on the books for several years, there have been no actual executions in over 30 years, thus we have, de facto, no capital punishment.The Maryland Court of Appeals, the ACLU and others have conspired to thwart the will of the citizens and the Maryland General Assembly and prevent justice from being served by blocking and delaying every single execution for years.
NEWS
By BENNARD B. PERLMAN | December 1, 1993
The recent death of Baltimore radio and TV personality Garry Moore caused me to recall our initial meeting. It was 1947 and, having completed my sophomore year in college, I was traveling the country during summer vacation. Eating lunch in the NBC commissary in Hollywood, I glanced out the window and observed a strange message on the marquee: ''Garry Moore in 'Take It Or Leave It' Tonight.''Now everyone knew that the emcee of that top-rated radio show was Phil Baker, so I sauntered over to the box office where free tickets were dispensed to inform someone of the error.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Staff Writer | November 29, 1993
Garry Moore had a secret: As a child, he liked to shadow the lamplighter around his Bolton Hill neighborhood, shinny up the posts and snuff out the flames.That humor would serve him well in later years as a popular radio and television personality: He was host of four network TV shows in the medium's early years and also won an Emmy.Garry Moore died yesterday, of emphysema, at his home on Hilton Head Island, S.C. He was 78.It was on his last visit to Baltimore six years ago that Mr. Moore -- born in Baltimore as Thomas Garrison Morfit -- told the truth about some of the adolescent high jinks that helped shape his career as a comedian.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | November 21, 1992
Who says the musical variety show is extinct on television? Certainly not Harold and Don Reid, Phil Balsley or Jimmy Fortune.Who?You're no fan of cable TV's "The Statler Brothers Show" if you cannot identify those four singer/musicians, whose variety show begins a second season tonight on the Nashville Network. Randy Travis appears as the guest star.The basic-service network says the hourlong program, at 9 p.m. Saturdays, is the most popular on TNN (carried by most cable systems in this area)
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | September 13, 1990
The Vagabond Players, one of America's oldest little theaters in continuous operation and Baltimore's first community theater, marking its Diamond Jubilee season with a number of significant events.From humble beginnings in a small storefront on Centre Street in 1916 to its current address in Fells Point, 806 South Broadway, the group has, over the 75 years of its existence, survived the Great Depression and two world wars to stage at least 600 plays for Baltimore audiences.Salty Sunpapers columnist H.L. Mencken wrote a comedy mounted by the company.
NEWS
February 1, 1991
Services for Alice E. Wayson, a former bank employee and singer, will be held at 11:30 a.m. today at the Singleton Funeral Home at 1 Second Ave. S.W., in Glen Burnie.Mrs. Wayson, who was 69, died Jan. 24 of cancer at a hospital in Punta Gorda, Fla., where she had lived for eight years.A native of Baltimore who was reared in Ferndale and graduated from Glen Burnie High School, the former Alice E. Ruark sang as a young woman on radio programs with Garry Moore. She also sang with the Woody Herman band during a Baltimore engagement.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | September 13, 1990
The Vagabond Players, one of America's oldest little theaters in continuous operation and Baltimore's first community theater, marking its Diamond Jubilee season with a number of significant events.From humble beginnings in a small storefront on Centre Street in 1916 to its current address in Fells Point, 806 South Broadway, the group has, over the 75 years of its existence, survived the Great Depression and two world wars to stage at least 600 plays for Baltimore audiences.Salty Sunpapers columnist H.L. Mencken wrote a comedy mounted by the company.
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