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Garry Marshall

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January 29, 1999
After a 62-day shooting schedule that took them from Baltimore to Berlin on the Eastern Shore, "Runaway Bride" wrapped up location shooting Tuesday inside a West Baltimore sound stage."
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 26, 2006
Keeping Up With the Steins is equal parts a rumination on the rapacious silliness that comes from efforts to keep up with the Joneses and a tale of family rapprochement. Too bad the filmmakers couldn't settle on one plotline and stick with it. The resulting film is affable enough, featuring an endearing turn from Garry Marshall as an eccentric grandfather who, on the occasion of his grandson's bar mitzvah, seems the only person in the universe concentrating on the boy's best interests.
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | July 29, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Perhaps it's the rough Bronx accent with its blustery crescendos that jab the air like one-two punches. Or the brusque facade that many have long associated with the cantankerous characters he's played, like Murphy Brown's boss Stan Lansing in the 1990s TV sitcom. Director Garry Marshall doesn't come across as a romantic spinner of fairy tales. But with box-office triumphs ranging from Pretty Woman to Runaway Bride, that's exactly what he's been -- a writer, actor and director who has pooh-poohed these increasingly cynical times and stuck to his belief that life on the big screen should always be better than reality.
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | July 29, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Perhaps it's the rough Bronx accent with its blustery crescendos that jab the air like one-two punches. Or the brusque facade that many have long associated with the cantankerous characters he's played, like Murphy Brown's boss Stan Lansing in the 1990s TV sitcom. Director Garry Marshall doesn't come across as a romantic spinner of fairy tales. But with box-office triumphs ranging from Pretty Woman to Runaway Bride, that's exactly what he's been -- a writer, actor and director who has pooh-poohed these increasingly cynical times and stuck to his belief that life on the big screen should always be better than reality.
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 26, 2006
Keeping Up With the Steins is equal parts a rumination on the rapacious silliness that comes from efforts to keep up with the Joneses and a tale of family rapprochement. Too bad the filmmakers couldn't settle on one plotline and stick with it. The resulting film is affable enough, featuring an endearing turn from Garry Marshall as an eccentric grandfather who, on the occasion of his grandson's bar mitzvah, seems the only person in the universe concentrating on the boy's best interests.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 26, 1999
"The Other Sister," which stars Juliette Lewis as a mildly retarded young woman striking out on her own for the first time, elicits such wildly divergent emotions that it leaves the audience feeling drained and confused.The movie suffers from a combination of maladies, including a strangely uneven emotional tone (It's a comedy! No, wait, it's a touching family drama! Hold on, it's a touching family dramedy!) and the questionable choice of casting Diane Keaton as an uptight Junior League type.
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By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,Orlando Sentinel | October 15, 1991
Small, trivial things can sometimes add up to large, important ones. That's the message of "Frankie & Johnny," an ingratiating romantic comedy currently playing nationally.It's only a little thing, for example, that Frankie (Michelle Pfeiffer) and Johnny (Al Pacino) have names which, taken together, form the title of a popular song. But trivial though this coincidence is, it's not nothing.And as Frankie and Johnny get to know each other, the little things start to add up: She's a waitress and he's a cook.
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By Lou Cedrone | November 29, 1990
Director Rob Reiner, reported to have said that ''Misery'' wasn't his kind of film, admits he was accurately quoted.''But I wasn't attracted to the story because of its violence,'' he said. ''I'm not interested in making violent films.''The movie is 106 minutes long, and there is very little horror. We intentionally tried to de-gore it. That's not my thrust. I was more interested in the fact that this is also a story about an author who has had great success with a certain genre, hopes to leave it and wonders if he will lose his audience if he does.
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November 13, 2007
73 Garry Marshall Producer 60 Joe Mantegna Actor 52 Whoopi Goldberg Actress 40 Jimmy Kimmel Comedian 27 Monique Coleman Actress
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 11, 2007
Jane Fonda's last great performance - and one of the last before she retired - was as an alcoholic in Sidney Lumet's The Morning After in 1986. In Georgia Rule, the second movie in her highly dubious comeback, she does an about-face on her persona and her talent, playing a teetotaler and, what's worse, a pious bore. As Georgia, a righteous small-town matriarch, Fonda gets to embody clannish virtues already a feature of the next presidential campaign. Georgia Rule (Universal Pictures) Starring Jane Fonda, Lindsay Lohan, Felicity Huffman.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 26, 1999
"The Other Sister," which stars Juliette Lewis as a mildly retarded young woman striking out on her own for the first time, elicits such wildly divergent emotions that it leaves the audience feeling drained and confused.The movie suffers from a combination of maladies, including a strangely uneven emotional tone (It's a comedy! No, wait, it's a touching family drama! Hold on, it's a touching family dramedy!) and the questionable choice of casting Diane Keaton as an uptight Junior League type.
FEATURES
January 29, 1999
After a 62-day shooting schedule that took them from Baltimore to Berlin on the Eastern Shore, "Runaway Bride" wrapped up location shooting Tuesday inside a West Baltimore sound stage."
FEATURES
By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,Orlando Sentinel | October 15, 1991
Small, trivial things can sometimes add up to large, important ones. That's the message of "Frankie & Johnny," an ingratiating romantic comedy currently playing nationally.It's only a little thing, for example, that Frankie (Michelle Pfeiffer) and Johnny (Al Pacino) have names which, taken together, form the title of a popular song. But trivial though this coincidence is, it's not nothing.And as Frankie and Johnny get to know each other, the little things start to add up: She's a waitress and he's a cook.
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By Lou Cedrone | November 29, 1990
Director Rob Reiner, reported to have said that ''Misery'' wasn't his kind of film, admits he was accurately quoted.''But I wasn't attracted to the story because of its violence,'' he said. ''I'm not interested in making violent films.''The movie is 106 minutes long, and there is very little horror. We intentionally tried to de-gore it. That's not my thrust. I was more interested in the fact that this is also a story about an author who has had great success with a certain genre, hopes to leave it and wonders if he will lose his audience if he does.
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By Cox News Service | October 28, 1990
"Pretty Woman," R, 1990, Touchstone, $19.95.Julia Roberts plays peek-a-boo with video viewers (and Richard Gere) this week as the gorgeous title character in "Pretty Woman."Priced at the consumer-friendly tab of $19.95, "Pretty Woman" is bound to make as much money on video as in the theaters. As the year's box-office tally stands, Garry Marshall's comedy is in first place with more than $175 million.Who could have imagined that a Cinderella tale about a Hollywood hooker and a Wall Street wolf would become Disney's top moneymaker?
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By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 11, 2004
Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement marks a return to Ruritania that arrives just in time to delight adolescent girls - and perhaps their mothers and grandmothers as well - before summer vacation is over. Like its predecessor, it's Hollywood hokum at its most glamorous and effective. Sequels are always tricky, especially when they're pure make-believe, but old pro director Garry Marshall understands that unabashed fairy tales require solid acting to make them believable. Julie Andrews returns, eternally radiant as Queen Clarisse Renaldi of the tiny principality of Genovia, as does Anne Hathaway as her granddaughter and heir to the throne, Princess Mia. Andrews fans are treated to a surprise: some years after throat surgery rendered her unable to sing she is again easily able to duet with the singer Raven, cast as a pal of Mia's, in the rousing "Your Crowning Glory."
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