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By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF COLUMNIST | August 3, 2003
Love Me, by Garrison Keillor. Viking. 272 pages. $24.95. Larry Wyler, the protagonist of Garrison Keillor's funny, bittersweet new novel, is a struggling writer who's bored to death with life in Minnesota and frustrated with his sensible, do-gooder wife - although he certainly seems to be handling it well. Here, for instance, is his gracious reaction when a friend announces that he's just sold his new book to Random House. "I wanted to choke him. I wanted to give him a swift kick where the sun don't shine.
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NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2008
Liberty: A Novel of Lake Wobegon Garrison Keillor Viking / 257 pages / $25.95 Clint Bunsen lost his liberty when he was 23. "Good-looking, able to run up and down stairs two at a time, put away a 32-ounce porterhouse and baked potato and banana cream pie and go to sleep with no regrets," he planned to enroll at St. Joseph School of Art in Santa Barbara after he mustered out of the Navy. But he drove to Minnesota to say so long to his mom and dad, married the high school sweetheart he planned to leave behind and took over the family's used-car repair business.
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FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Staff Writer | November 17, 1993
Garrison Keillor called back from a Kentucky hotel. Eastern Standard Time. "I think." Mr. Keillor wasn't perfectly sure of his whereabouts but was perfectly prepared to address the state of guyhood."
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun reporter | November 30, 2006
The University of Maryland School of Medicine unveiled plans yesterday for a splashy, yearlong celebration to mark the institution's bicentennial. The school, founded in 1807, is the oldest public medical school in the country. Highlights of the anniversary celebration, which are scheduled to kick off in January, include: A series of free public lectures at the Hippodrome Theatre with singer Patti LaBelle, former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno, and retired Oriole Cal Ripken. A live radio broadcast of A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor.
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Contributing Writer | June 24, 1994
Inside the offices of the Columbia Festival of the Arts, the success of the first weekend in this two-week event can be seen in an addition to the wall.A two-line classified advertisement, blown up on a copier, says "GARRISON KEILLOR -- 2 or 4 tickets desperately wanted. Columbia Festival, June 19.""I thought it was great. I thought we had arrived,", said Lynne Nemeth, marketing director for the Columbia Festival of the Arts, a post she's held since the festival began six years ago. She also found it brought indirect publicity to the festival.
NEWS
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,Sun staff | November 23, 1997
"Wobegon Boy," by Garrison Keillor. Viking. 305 pages. $24.95.Thomas Wolfe told us we can't go home again. Garrison Keillor knows the opposite is true: We can't ever really leave. Try as he might, and he has tried mightily enough to seek refuge in Denmark and New York City, Keillor keeps returning to Minnesota and Lake Wobegon, his fictional town that time forgot. This is a darker, less sentimental and surprisingly less satisfying trip than his previous journeys there - "Lake Wobegon Days," a popular novel, and "Leaving Home," a collection of essays patterned after the stories Keillor tells on his weekly radio show, "A Prairie Home Companion."
NEWS
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | November 14, 1993
Title: "The Book of Guys"Author: Garrison KeillorPublisher: VikingLength, price: 340 pages, $22 Garrison Keillor looks around him and sees his brothers hurting. Men who carry the wounds of being a male in the late 20th century, with sex roles all confused and no one sure how to act. Men who aren't allowed to watch NFL games all Sunday, but must instead take the kids to the Discovery Zone during an afternoon of perfect football weather. Men who feel they can no longer scratch and spit and swear.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Sun Book Editor | November 17, 1991
New York -- Time is running short for Garrison Keillor this Wednesday evening. He's closeted in a small room behind an auditorium on the West Side where, in a few minutes, he's scheduled to give a reading from his new novel, "WLT: a Radio Romance." He's good-naturedly fending off questions from an out-of-town interviewer, talking about favorite topics like Minnesota and radio and writing for the New Yorker. There are interlopers popping in -- people coordinating the reading who are meeting him for the first time, as well as obviously impressed glad-handers who couldn't resist the temptation to meet Mr. Prairie Home Companion himself.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun reporter | November 30, 2006
The University of Maryland School of Medicine unveiled plans yesterday for a splashy, yearlong celebration to mark the institution's bicentennial. The school, founded in 1807, is the oldest public medical school in the country. Highlights of the anniversary celebration, which are scheduled to kick off in January, include: A series of free public lectures at the Hippodrome Theatre with singer Patti LaBelle, former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno, and retired Oriole Cal Ripken. A live radio broadcast of A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | November 17, 1991
NEW YORK -- Garrison Keillor has asked Ulla Skaerved, his wife of six years, for a divorce, according to the New York Daily News."Garrison Keillor has just given his wife a one-way ticket to Lake Wobegon," columnist Richard Johnson wrote.The paper reports that his new love, known only as Dorrit, hasung on Mr. Keillor's "American Radio Company of the Air" radio show and has been tutoring him in Danish, his wife's first language.A spokesman for the American Public Radio network said Friday that Mr. Keillor had issued a "no comment" on the matter.
NEWS
October 31, 2006
Focus on torture highlights cruelty Thank you so much for the brilliant articles on Thursday's Opinion Commentary page - "An American atrocity" (Oct. 26) by Myron Beckenstein and "Bush closes the gap between freedom and terror, but there is an upside" (Oct. 26) by Garrison Keillor. Both presented an accurate picture of what we have done in passing the Military Commissions Act of 2006 - Mr. Beckenstein with heartbreaking eloquence and the face of an innocent victim of the policies, and Mr. Keillor with biting humor.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 9, 2006
A Prairie Home Companion is a down-home-exquisite musical dramedy. It fills you with a joyful noise even when the subject is mortality. Working from a script by Garrison Keillor, with some of the personalities and/or characters from Keillor's radio show of the same name, the director, Robert Altman, achieves a homespun-gossamer texture. That's a miracle for a movie about a buttoned-up Minnesotan, Keillor, known here as "GK," hosting an old-fashioned live variety program with a cast of radio performers whose messy lives intersect uproariously and unexpectedly with their on-air personae.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF COLUMNIST | August 3, 2003
Love Me, by Garrison Keillor. Viking. 272 pages. $24.95. Larry Wyler, the protagonist of Garrison Keillor's funny, bittersweet new novel, is a struggling writer who's bored to death with life in Minnesota and frustrated with his sensible, do-gooder wife - although he certainly seems to be handling it well. Here, for instance, is his gracious reaction when a friend announces that he's just sold his new book to Random House. "I wanted to choke him. I wanted to give him a swift kick where the sun don't shine.
NEWS
January 26, 2003
Norman Panama, 88, a screenwriter who collaborated with Melvin Frank on such films as White Christmas, The Road to Utopia and Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, has died in Los Angeles. Mr. Panama died Jan. 13 at UCLA Medical Center of complications from Parkinson's disease. The team's screenwriting earned them three Oscar nominations for The Road to Utopia, Knock on Wood and The Facts of Life. Among the other films Mr. Frank and Mr. Panama wrote were The Court Jester and That Certain Feeling.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and By Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | June 23, 2002
VIENNA, Va. -- The voice like drowsy thunder reassures us that everything is under control. Garrison Keillor proceeds from syllable to deliberate syllable with the unhurried cadence of a rocking chair, back and forth, back and forth ... Just the sound of that voice conjures up quiet images: a sweating glass of lemonade, a moth flattened against a window screen. The resulting state of dreamy contemplation is what the roughly 3 million fans of A Prairie Home Companion tune in for on their radios each weekend.
NEWS
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1998
"Goodnight, Nebraska," by Tom McNeal. Random House. 311 pages. $23.What a remarkable debut. Tom McNeal has written a book - and created a small town -that is as vivid and alive as Sinclair Lewis's Zenith, Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio, and Garrison Keillor's Lake Wobegon."Goodnight, Nebraska," the title of the book, is also the name of the town, home to 1,680 people, the Friendly Festival and, right there at the intersection of Main Street and Highway 20, McKibben's Mobil Station.Seventeen-year-old Randall Hunsacker has been sent there from Salt Lake City, where he shot his mother's boyfriend and wrecked a stolen car. He has come to finish school, play football, fix cars at McKibben's and get out of Goodnight as quickly as he possibly can."
NEWS
February 18, 1991
Mitchell V. Charnley, 92, a retired University of Minnesota journalism professor whose students included Eric Sevareid, Harry Reasoner and Garrison Keillor, died Saturday in a Minneapolis hospital. He was the author of a number of textbooks, including "Reporting" and "News by Radio." His pioneering work in broadcast instruction earned him the 1963 Distinguished Achievement Award of the Radio-TV News Directors Association. And in 1968, he was awarded Sigma Delta Chi's Distinguished Teaching in Journalism Award.
FEATURES
By Ken Parish Perkins and Ken Parish Perkins,Dallas Morning News | February 13, 1992
Garrison Keillor, writer, master storyteller and radio star, has been all over the place lately. His book, "WLT: A Radio Romance," remains a strong seller in bookstores. Each Saturday, he writes, produces and hosts "American Radio Company," aired on 235 public radio stations.Now he's even on the tube. In fact, "Garrison Keillor's Hello Love" is the second of three specials for PBS. The first aired in November; the third is set for April.Garrison Keillor, television star?Loyal Keillor fans nervous about Keillor leaving his radio days need not worry.
NEWS
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,Sun staff | November 23, 1997
"Wobegon Boy," by Garrison Keillor. Viking. 305 pages. $24.95.Thomas Wolfe told us we can't go home again. Garrison Keillor knows the opposite is true: We can't ever really leave. Try as he might, and he has tried mightily enough to seek refuge in Denmark and New York City, Keillor keeps returning to Minnesota and Lake Wobegon, his fictional town that time forgot. This is a darker, less sentimental and surprisingly less satisfying trip than his previous journeys there - "Lake Wobegon Days," a popular novel, and "Leaving Home," a collection of essays patterned after the stories Keillor tells on his weekly radio show, "A Prairie Home Companion."
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Contributing Writer | June 24, 1994
Inside the offices of the Columbia Festival of the Arts, the success of the first weekend in this two-week event can be seen in an addition to the wall.A two-line classified advertisement, blown up on a copier, says "GARRISON KEILLOR -- 2 or 4 tickets desperately wanted. Columbia Festival, June 19.""I thought it was great. I thought we had arrived,", said Lynne Nemeth, marketing director for the Columbia Festival of the Arts, a post she's held since the festival began six years ago. She also found it brought indirect publicity to the festival.
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