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Garrick Ohlsson

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By Tim Smith and By Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | April 28, 2002
I have no burnout," Garrick Ohlsson says. "I guess that's because I'm so incredibly immature." The laughter on the other end of the phone is hearty and contagious. And for a moment, the pianist sounds more like a high schooler than a 54-year-old virtuoso with an exceptional career that has been going on for more than three decades. Ohlsson, whose recital tonight will wrap up the Shriver Hall Concert Series season, clearly thrives on the entire business of making music -- rehearsals, concerts, recordings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2010
FRIDAY TWO ROOMS: Lee Blessing's love story takes place in two rooms and tells the story of one man in captivity in the Middle East and his wife waiting for him at home. The play, directed by Vincent Lancisi, is at Everyman Theatre, 1727 N. Charles St., through Feb. 21 with performances Wednesdays through Sundays. Showtimes vary. Tickets are $18 to $40. Call 410-752-2208 or go to everymantheatre.org. GEORGE STRAIT AND REBA MCENTIRE: The King of Country and his Grammy Award-winning counterpart come to 1st Mariner Arena, 201 W Baltimore St. The concert starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are $79.50 to $89.50.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 5, 2010
W ith temperatures stuck in an annoying, chilling rut as the new year begins, the array of hot cultural activity ahead looks all the more attractive. Something warm and interesting awaits inside museums, theaters and concert halls during the bleak, wintry weeks all across the Baltimore area. Since everybody likes Top 10 lists, here's one outlining highlights (in chronological order), but this only scrapes the surface. Plenty of other comforting jolts from the arts can easily be found.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 5, 2010
W ith temperatures stuck in an annoying, chilling rut as the new year begins, the array of hot cultural activity ahead looks all the more attractive. Something warm and interesting awaits inside museums, theaters and concert halls during the bleak, wintry weeks all across the Baltimore area. Since everybody likes Top 10 lists, here's one outlining highlights (in chronological order), but this only scrapes the surface. Plenty of other comforting jolts from the arts can easily be found.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 9, 1997
The piano recital is reputedly near extinction, but Baltimore seems to be late in getting the news.Today Garrick Ohlsson adds to an impressive list of scheduled performances that includes last weekend's packed-to-the-rafters appearance by Horacio Gutierrez and the prestigious lineup of the Shriver Hall Concert Series, which began with a recital by Leon Fleisher and will end in April with one by Murray Perahia.Ohlsson -- a physically imposing 6-foot-4 -- has been an important presence on the world's concert stages since 1970 when he became the only American to win first prize in Warsaw's Chopin Competition, beating out a strong field that included the likes of Mitsuko Uchida and Emanuel Ax.Since Ohlsson is a serious, thoughtful artist, it comes as something of a surprise that the first half of his recital tonight consists of the seemingly unlikely combination of Beethoven's backward-looking Sonata No. 16 in G major (Opus 31, No. 1)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2010
FRIDAY TWO ROOMS: Lee Blessing's love story takes place in two rooms and tells the story of one man in captivity in the Middle East and his wife waiting for him at home. The play, directed by Vincent Lancisi, is at Everyman Theatre, 1727 N. Charles St., through Feb. 21 with performances Wednesdays through Sundays. Showtimes vary. Tickets are $18 to $40. Call 410-752-2208 or go to everymantheatre.org. GEORGE STRAIT AND REBA MCENTIRE: The King of Country and his Grammy Award-winning counterpart come to 1st Mariner Arena, 201 W Baltimore St. The concert starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are $79.50 to $89.50.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | July 5, 1992
The piano that Nelson Freire will play on this week and next is a new Steinway that the Baltimore Symphony bought this past spring after a year-long search.For years the BSO had been leasing Hamburg-made Steinways at a cost of $8,000 a year. The orchestra owned its own pianos -- a New York Steinway and a Viennese Bosendorfer -- but almost all of the pianists who came here didn't like them and the orchestra couldn't afford the money, now about $70,000, to buy a new instrument. So it was caught in the position of losing money through leases because it couldn't afford to make a larger purchase.
FEATURES
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | September 30, 1990
Warsaw -- As capitalism replaces communism, commercialization is recasting culture in countries where communist governments once heavily subsidized the arts and guaranteed Everyman's access to theater and concert hall.The latest and most spectacular sacrifice on the altar of profit is the 12th edition of Warsaw's quinquennial international Chopin Piano Competition, which begins tomorrow.The contest, for performers between the ages of 17 and 28, is one of the world's most prestigious, for the winners a sure-fire stepping stone to a keyboard career.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 26, 1997
The Baltimore Symphony's 1997-98 season will be a last hurrah for David Zinman in his 13th and final year as the orchestra's music director.The schedule, announced yesterday, calls for Zinman to spend 14 weeks with the orchestra in which he will: complete his cycle of Mahler's mature symphonic works with performances of "Das Lied von der Erde" (Oct. 23-24), make his 29th and 30th recordings with the BSO, conduct a sequel to his successful "Dance Mix" concert of several years ago (Feb. 12-14)
NEWS
October 23, 1990
Kevin Kenner, a 27-year-old graduate of the Peabody Institute, was denied first prize in the Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw last weekend. But that doesn't diminish the fact that his second prize was the top honor given this year -- an achievement that puts him in distinguished company. The last American to come out on top in the Chopin trials was Garrick Ohlsson in 1970. The second prize that year went to Mitsuko Uchida, the Japanese pianist whose career has since surpassed Ohlsson's, in large part on the strength of her exquisite Mozart performances and recordings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and By Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | April 28, 2002
I have no burnout," Garrick Ohlsson says. "I guess that's because I'm so incredibly immature." The laughter on the other end of the phone is hearty and contagious. And for a moment, the pianist sounds more like a high schooler than a 54-year-old virtuoso with an exceptional career that has been going on for more than three decades. Ohlsson, whose recital tonight will wrap up the Shriver Hall Concert Series season, clearly thrives on the entire business of making music -- rehearsals, concerts, recordings.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 26, 1997
The Baltimore Symphony's 1997-98 season will be a last hurrah for David Zinman in his 13th and final year as the orchestra's music director.The schedule, announced yesterday, calls for Zinman to spend 14 weeks with the orchestra in which he will: complete his cycle of Mahler's mature symphonic works with performances of "Das Lied von der Erde" (Oct. 23-24), make his 29th and 30th recordings with the BSO, conduct a sequel to his successful "Dance Mix" concert of several years ago (Feb. 12-14)
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 9, 1997
The piano recital is reputedly near extinction, but Baltimore seems to be late in getting the news.Today Garrick Ohlsson adds to an impressive list of scheduled performances that includes last weekend's packed-to-the-rafters appearance by Horacio Gutierrez and the prestigious lineup of the Shriver Hall Concert Series, which began with a recital by Leon Fleisher and will end in April with one by Murray Perahia.Ohlsson -- a physically imposing 6-foot-4 -- has been an important presence on the world's concert stages since 1970 when he became the only American to win first prize in Warsaw's Chopin Competition, beating out a strong field that included the likes of Mitsuko Uchida and Emanuel Ax.Since Ohlsson is a serious, thoughtful artist, it comes as something of a surprise that the first half of his recital tonight consists of the seemingly unlikely combination of Beethoven's backward-looking Sonata No. 16 in G major (Opus 31, No. 1)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | July 5, 1992
The piano that Nelson Freire will play on this week and next is a new Steinway that the Baltimore Symphony bought this past spring after a year-long search.For years the BSO had been leasing Hamburg-made Steinways at a cost of $8,000 a year. The orchestra owned its own pianos -- a New York Steinway and a Viennese Bosendorfer -- but almost all of the pianists who came here didn't like them and the orchestra couldn't afford the money, now about $70,000, to buy a new instrument. So it was caught in the position of losing money through leases because it couldn't afford to make a larger purchase.
FEATURES
By Kay Withers and Kay Withers,Special to The Sun | September 30, 1990
Warsaw -- As capitalism replaces communism, commercialization is recasting culture in countries where communist governments once heavily subsidized the arts and guaranteed Everyman's access to theater and concert hall.The latest and most spectacular sacrifice on the altar of profit is the 12th edition of Warsaw's quinquennial international Chopin Piano Competition, which begins tomorrow.The contest, for performers between the ages of 17 and 28, is one of the world's most prestigious, for the winners a sure-fire stepping stone to a keyboard career.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | March 2, 2003
The Washington Performing Arts Society has another typically enticing lineup of more than 60 attractions for the 2003-2004 season, presented at a variety of venues. On the classical front, the big news is the first area performance by the Berlin Philharmonic with its new music director, Sir Simon Rattle. The concert, a co-presentation with the Kennedy Center, has Rattle's stamp all over it -- a work by young, ear-stretching German composer Heiner Goebbels, an underplayed symphony by Sibelius (No. 7)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | February 19, 1992
Joseph Suk's "Asrael" Symphony is one of those death-driven, love-haunted Monumental pieces that every composer of stature (or who aspired to stature) seemed to be writing in the years before World War I. Some of the greatest and best-known are the symphonies of Mahler and the "Gurrelieder" of his student, Arnold Schoenberg.Last night in Meyerhoff Hall, the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra and its Czech-born music director, Libor Pesek, brought us the Suk symphony -- which some critics claim approaches the heart-wrenching stature of the best post-romantic masterpieces.
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