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Garrett County

NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
Most roads were cleared of snow and fallen trees in Garrett County as of late Sunday, and most federal and state emergency officials who'd responded there following superstorm Sandy's damaging blizzard had departed. Still, thousands remained without power. "The only thing that's still lacking, as far as I understand it, is power restoration, and that's a slow, tedious process because of the damage that's been done and because of the vastness of Garrett County," said Jim Raley, chairman of the county's Board of Commissioners.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
Recovery for the worst-hit areas of Maryland dragged on three days after the remnants of Sandy swept through, while the rest of the state got back to business as usual. In Crisfield, among the hardest-hit areas, some residents faced long-term relocation after storm waters made their homes uninhabitable, including about 100 who live in a public housing project. Elsewhere, tens of thousands of people remained without power Thursday evening, mostly in snowbound Garrett County. Service for some Verizon customers also was down.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
A crew of Baltimore-area first-responders is headed to Garrett County to assist in recovery from a major snowstorm that hit as Sandy plowed into the mid-Atlantic. About 60 workers from the Urban Search and Rescue team will help clear debris and trees knocked down by the more than 2 feet of snow, conduct searches for and checks on those affected by the storm, and assist in evacuation efforts. The team pulls members from emergency response agencies from Baltimore and seven surrounding counties.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
The Baltimore area is getting back to normal after Sandy - government offices are open, trains are running again and the lights are on at 95 percent of the homes and businesses that lost power. But Sandy's dangers linger. A man clearing storm-damaged trees in Annapolis was killed Wednesday by a falling tree, the third Maryland death related to the post-tropical cyclone that had been Hurricane Sandy. Across the state, many residents took stock of damage and mopped up Wednesday.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Linda Kemphfer held out overnight as the power, heat and water went out, but grew frightened as it became apparent she was trapped in her home deep in the woods of Garrett County. "We were going to freeze to death," she said of her decision to call 911 this week as superstorm Sandy continued to add to the snow mounds piling up around her. "It was stressful, worrying whether you're going to get out or not. " By the time three members of the National Guard arrived on snowmobiles, after having cut a path through fallen trees to her home with a chain saw, it was nearly dark, she said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
Much of Maryland's westernmost county remained largely inaccessible on Wednesday afternoon, a result of superstorm Sandy's meeting a cold front and dumping more than 2 feet of heavy, wet snow on the region. About 80 percent of Garrett County residents - or about 24,000 people, according to recent census data - remained without power, and secondary roads remained "completely inaccessible," according to Brad Frantz, the county's emergency services coordinator. "This is as bad as I've seen it, and I've been in public safety for 38 years," Frantz said.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2012
More than 2 feet of snow fell in parts of Garrett and Allegany counties as the remnants of Hurricane Sandy collided with a cold front backed by polar air, closing east- and westbound sections of Interstate 68 in Western Maryland until late Tuesday morning. John Darnley, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service's Pittsburgh office, said disruptions to telephone service were hampering efforts to put together a complete picture of the snowfall. But in Oakland, at 2,500 feet above sea level, the service measured 24 inches, with more coming down Tuesday evening.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2012
One in a series of profiles of Maryland delegates to the Republican National Convention Ask Brenda Butscher to compare this year's Republican convention to the first one she attended, in 1972, and her answer is unexpected. "One thing is I haven't met with an ice pick since I've been here," the 72-year-old Garrett County woman says with a smile. Butscher, who has attended nine national political conventions — more than anyone else in Maryland's delegation — found herself caught up in the Vietnam War protests that accompanied the 1972 nomination of Richard M. Nixon in Miami Beach.
EXPLORE
By Jim Kennedy | August 8, 2012
Since I was a kid, I've spent a lot of time in the woods. My family has camped in state and national parks along the East Coast from Maine to Florida, and I've even hiked relatively short portions of the Appalachian Trail in Maryland, Pennsylvania and Virginia. Trout fishing is something I enjoy immensely and it's an endeavor that obliges those who are serious about its practice to spend a fair amount of time in fairly remote territories. Pine needles, beach sand and leaves have served as comfortable cushions under my sleeping bags; roots, pine cones and rocks have made for unpleasant sleeping experiences.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2011
The annual Maryland bear hunt ended Thursday night after a total of 65 bears were killed, the largest being a 372-pound male shot by a 12-year old boy. Colton Lucas of Kitzmiller in Garrett County brought down the biggest of the bears, which averaged 154 pounds, according to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Most of the bears — 59 of them — were killed in Garrett County. The other six were killed in Allegany County. Nearly 70 percent of the bears were killed on private property.
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