Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGarnish
IN THE NEWS

Garnish

NEWS
By Damien O'Donnell and Damien O'Donnell,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 18, 2003
Fresh fish, tropical fruit, European sauces and a spirit of aloha can turn an ordinary outdoor meal into an extraordinary outdoor dining experience. The Hawaiian Islands are a blend of ancient cultural traditions from Polynesia, China and Japan. Combine these traditions with fresh local ingredients, Asian spices and European culinary traditions, and you have the Hawaiian fusion cuisine Roy's founder, Roy Yamaguchi, has made popular. To make things easier, plan your Hawaiian fusion meal in advance.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Russ Parsons and Russ Parsons,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2003
Until recently, consommes were relegated to sickroom fare, the kind of thing your maiden aunt might sip sitting in her rocker when her liver was acting up. Then a funny thing happened: Chefs began to rediscover the artistic possibilities of a soothing broth. Now it sometimes seems you can't sit down to a tasting menu without being presented with a dainty little bowl of something around which a perfumed consomme is gently ladled. In a way, this is another case of "what's old is new again."
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2003
Maryland's tax collectors have known about Dolores E. Scott for years. To them, the Owings Mills nurse is a renowned scofflaw, one of a small group of Maryland tax protesters that keeps the state comptroller's criminal investigation unit in business. They, and the Internal Revenue Service, have haggled with the 61-year-old - who they say owes $21,000 in back income taxes - for more than a decade. But Scott's most recent protest, the comptroller's and attorney general's offices say, went too far. And this week, a Baltimore County Circuit Court judge agreed with them.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2002
Jack Garnish knew he would find construction materials, volunteer builders and prospective homeowners in his quest to provide housing to the needy. But locating a reasonably priced building lot in Carroll County could present a problem. Persistence and networking paid off, said Garnish, president of the Carroll chapter of Habitat for Humanity. It took nearly two years, but he got a good deal on a small lot south of Westminster. Habitat, an international, faith-based organization that builds affordable housing, begins construction today on its first house in Carroll.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2002
Habitat for Humanity of Carroll County has businesses willing to donate materials, volunteers willing to work in home construction and a growing list of working poor who would like to make the leap from renter to homeowner. What it doesn't have are building lots, a must if the international faith-based organization's campaign to build affordable housing for Carroll's needy is to get off the ground. "Materials and labor are not the major costs in this effort, and we have no problem finding people who want a chance to be homeowners," said Jack Garnish, president of the county group's 13-member board.
FEATURES
By Barbara Hansen and Barbara Hansen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 30, 2000
Baby greens are giants compared to the latest minuscule culinary trend: microgreens. These are tiny versions of familiar plants such as arugula, amaranth, chard and beet greens and of plants not so well-known, including shiso, popcorn shoots and menegi (Japanese green onion). Micros are not sprouts. They are recognizable plants, plucked as soon as the first true leaves - leaves shaped like those of the mature plant - appear. Right now, you'll find them only in the trendiest restaurants, where they are employed as costly garnishes.
NEWS
By Gary Krino and Gary Krino,Orange County Register | October 10, 1999
In the past five years, the so-very-English ritual of afternoon tea has become a popular social event.Tearooms offer scones with clotted cream and jam, fresh fruit, cheese and crackers, truffles, chocolate-dipped strawberries and pastries. But it's the tea sandwich that takes center stage.Delicate and dainty, it can be filled with just about anything -- from a heavenly rich salmon pate to come-and-get-it peanut butter and jelly.For the at-home tea, making wonderful sandwiches is a matter of timing, organization, experimenting with breads and fillings, and knowing how to present the assembled sandwiches, according to Carol Cox and Anne Ennis, tea-sandwich experts extraordinaire.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | February 7, 1999
For college students, sushi is the pizza of the '90s.Of course, pizza is also the pizza of the '90s, so there may be some flaw in my reasoning here. But I still think the new Japanese-Korean restaurant Niwana will succeed where a pizza place didn't, across the street from the Johns Hopkins University Homewood campus.Niwana opened recently after major renovations. The restaurant isn't fancy, but behind the long bar is a lower-level dining room with blond-wood furniture and muted colors. It's fresh- looking and soothing.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | January 24, 1999
We Marylanders have gotten to the point where we don't expect much from our Asian restaurants. So many of them are as interchangeable as their names. Then along comes the Asean Bistro; and like it or not, you have to give restaurateur Jesse Wong and his staff credit for trying something different. Actually this is a very likable restaurant, although you may not like the name. "Asean" (pronounced "AH-see-an") isn't a misspelling; it's the acronym for Association of Southeast Asian Nations.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.