Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGarments
IN THE NEWS

Garments

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Jean Patteson and Jean Patteson,Orlando Sentinel | October 17, 1990
Catsuits cause comments.Sometimes they're compliments. More often they're catcalls derisive references to thunder thighs, hippo hips and the urgent need for liposuction. Meow, meow. (Could this be why they're called catsuits?)The fact of the matter is, unless a woman is shaped like Cher, a clingy, one-piece catsuit is not the kindest cut of all.So why did so many designers include catsuits (a.k.a. bodysuits or unitards) in their fall collections? And why are so many stores stocking them?Of course, designers fit their creations on models, lithe, leggy women who look sensational in sleek, second-skin garments.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2014
  Christian Siriano is going from Fashion Week to "Freak Show. " The "Project Runway" vet, who was born and raised in Annapolis and attended the Baltimore School for the Arts, will be using his keen fashion sense to judge a costume design competition tied to FX's horror-drama series "American Horror Story. " Announced today to celebrate the launch of "AHS's" fourth season, "Freak Show," the contest "invited participants with an eye for the unusual to design an original costume inspired by the series," according to a press release.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune zHC ALB | December 26, 1991
Earlier this fall, we wrote about a new catalog targeted at African-American women that will debut early in 1993; to be called "E Style," the catalog venture is being developed by Ebony magazine and Spiegel Inc.We've since learned that a catalog with the same target audience already exists. Essence By Mail catalog was launched seven years ago by Essence Communications, Inc., publisher of Essence magazine, and Hanover Direct, Inc., a mail-order retailer.Essence Catalog Director Michele Mullings, says, "We feature African-American women who model garments with the black figure (fit)
EXPLORE
November 29, 2011
The Laurel ZIPS dry cleaners, along with 22 ZIPS locations on the East Coast, is offering free dry cleaning to the unemployed if they need an outfit clean for an interview. Those seeking free dry cleaning must present documentation that proves they are unemployed and looking for a job. In return, they are allowed to have three garments cleaned each week. There are no exclusions on the type of garments accepted and the offer will last as long as the economy remains bad. The Laurel ZIPS is located at 14705C Baltimore Ave.
EXPLORE
November 29, 2011
The Laurel ZIPS dry cleaners, along with 22 ZIPS locations on the East Coast, is offering free dry cleaning to the unemployed if they need an outfit clean for an interview. Those seeking free dry cleaning must present documentation that proves they are unemployed and looking for a job. In return, they are allowed to have three garments cleaned each week. There are no exclusions on the type of garments accepted and the offer will last as long as the economy remains bad. The Laurel ZIPS is located at 14705C Baltimore Ave.
NEWS
By Marla Dickerson and Marla Dickerson,Los Angeles Times | July 8, 2007
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador -- It was a story of hope: a Central American sweatshop transformed into a unionized, worker-run apparel factory thanks to nearly $600,000 in loans and donations, including help from retailers Gap and Land's End, and the AFL-CIO. Boosters traveled to U.S. college campuses and church basements, promoting the Just Garments plant in El Salvador as a company looking to do well by doing right by employees. Impoverished Salvadorans saw a chance to earn better wages and to have a say in their future.
FEATURES
By Pat Morgan and Pat Morgan,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | January 29, 1992
The model cliche that '60s and '70s woman with a figure like Macaulay Culkin's no longer slinks down fashion show runways or sashays through photo shoots. She's been dethroned by curvaceous '90s models like Cindy Crawford, Naomi Campbell and Elle MacPherson.And while these women are leaner, firmer and far more athletic than the hourglass goddesses of eras past Marilyn Monroe, Betty Grable, Jane Russell there's no arguing that the femme fatale is back. With this new appreciation for cleavage and curves comes a renewed interest in what apparel manufacturers call "foundation garments."
FEATURES
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | July 18, 1991
New York--Maybe it's the result of the poor economy, her recent divorce or simply a welcome burst of creative energy.Whatever the reason, designer Rebecca Moses is suddenly awash in new projects.Though she didn't hold a fall show this year, it wasn't for lack of new garments to introduce. In addition to her regular sportswear collection, she has launched a separate knitwear collection as well as a new line called Rebecca Moses One Hundred and One. This one features perfect, go-with-everything basics, what Ms. Moses calls "fast, fun fashion."
FEATURES
By Barry Meier and Barry Meier,N.Y. Times News Service | November 21, 1990
Parkas, shells and other rugged outdoor wear are supposed to be part of the simple life. But increasingly, buying such clothing is anything but simple.Tags boasting of various fabric treatments read like primers in fluid mechanics.More and more synthetics, all competitors to down, are on the scene, many with strange-sounding names.And with some specially treated shells priced at $400 or more, it's not too hard for a bewildered shopper to end up buying a garment more suited to an assault on Mount Everest than a weekend walk.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | February 28, 1993
You can extend the life and appearance of your clothes with day-to-day maintenance. Here are some suggestions, gleaned from the pages of the "Singer Clothing Care & Repair" book.* Everyday maintenance includes airing, brushing, ironing or pressing, cleaning and removing spots and stains promptly.* How carefully you store your clothes; whether you have an organized closet; and how you store out-of-season clothes will affect how often you have to clean and how much care is needed.* Use plastic, padded or wooden hangers to help clothes maintain shape.
LIFESTYLE
Susan Reimer | October 13, 2011
It can be one of the nasty surprises for breast cancer patients. After the lump, the biopsy, the surgery, the radiation and the chemo, the wig and the mastectomy bathing suit — as if these things were not enough — suddenly one arm, or both, swells monstrously, painfully. It is lymphedema. And nobody warned you about it. "I never expected it. I never even heard of it," said Tia Neale, a breast cancer patient who lives in Owings Mills. She is resting on an examining table at Mercy Medical Center's Weinberg Center while therapist Maureen McBeth gently massages her chest, stomach, arm and hand, doing manually what Neale's lymphatic system isn't doing on its own anymore — urging the fluid the body makes ceaselessly into the circulatory system and out of the body.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 12, 2010
Anna K. "Honey" Glebas, a retired Baltimore garment worker, died Tuesday of multiple organ failure at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 94. Anna Eva Kleinota, the daughter of immigrant tailors from Lithuania, was born in Baltimore and raised on South Paca Street. She was a graduate of Southern High School and had worked for more than 40 years as a seamstress for Stetson Dee and the Haas Tailoring Co. before retiring in 1973. She married Charles Glebas, a tailor, in 1934, and for many years the couple lived on Bateman Avenue in Windsor Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2010
Angela Grube quickly combed through the clothing rack ignoring several pristine looking garments before the prized item caught her eye: a black dress with a torn zipper and holes in the underarms. Grube was shopping in the basement of a vintage store in Hampden when she found the treasure: a three-quarter length, cocktail dress adorned with bluish glass beads atop embroidered trees. She basked in her good luck. The damage to the dress would be a quick fix for the self taught seamstress and vintage clothing store owner.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Sun | August 30, 2009
SALARY: $120,000 AGE: 49 YEARS ON THE JOB: 5 How she got started: : Zia Boccaccio, a native of Cuzco, Peru, easily remembers the first time she became interested in alpacas. She was 6 or 7 when she spotted an alpaca on a trip with her family to ancestral land in the Andes Mountains of Peru. She describes the animal as aloof, delicate and beautiful. When she was 21 years old, she married an American and moved to Washington. For about 12 years, she worked as an operational manager for Steilmann European Selection, a German fashion company.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | May 2, 2008
Lena Della Schmidt, a retired garment worker and longtime Glen Burnie resident, died of heart failure Monday at Harbor Hospital. She was 70. Lena Ellingson was born in Baltimore and raised on Light Street. She was a graduate of city public schools. She worked for 43 years as a sewing machine operator for the Acme Pad Corp. on Warwick Avenue, before retiring in 1999. Mrs. Schmidt, who enjoyed playing bingo and cards, was an active member of American Legion Post 277 in Pasadena. Services will be held at 11 a.m. today at the McCully-Polyniak Funeral Home, 3204 Mountain Road, Pasadena.
NEWS
February 12, 2008
Lillian E. Wright, a retired garment worker who held an office in her union, died of congestive heart failure Feb. 5 at the Genesis Healthcare Loch Raven Center. The Randallstown resident was 83. Lillian Elizabeth Harris was born in Baltimore and raised on East Eager Street. She attended Dunbar High School and later earned her GED diploma. In 1975, she received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Antioch College. For many years she worked the London Fog raincoat factory in Woodberry and was an member of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers Union, where she served a term as local president.
FEATURES
By Deborah Hofmann and Deborah Hofmann,N.Y. Times | October 2, 1991
Teflon is no longer just about pots and pans.This fall, the protective surface treatment developed by the chemical division of E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. for kitchenware also protects fashion wear."
FEATURES
By Valli Herman and Valli Herman,Los Angeles Daily News | October 16, 1991
THEY ARE either the greatest invention since liposuction or the worst since the chastity belt.In lingerie departments across the country, women of all ages, shapes and sizes are buying new types of foundation garments that promise to provide the control and shape of girdles, corsets and merry widows of the past but without the pain.It's a combination of fashion with foundations that is stirring up sales for many manufacturers. From 1989 to 1990, sales of body-shaping garments increased by more than $25 million, from $324 million to $350 million, according to the Intimate Apparel Council.
FEATURES
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN REPORTER | August 28, 2007
As head of a Park Heights children's mentoring program, David Edmondson, 30, is constantly telling his young charges to keep a neat haircut, tuck their clothes in, and most important, "Pull up your pants!" But that doesn't mean he's in total agreement with an Atlanta city councilman who has caused quite a buzz recently by proposing a ban in his city on visible bra straps and thongs and low-slung pants that expose underwear. "If I see my son [showing his underwear], I'm going to smack him straight in his head," says Edmondson, executive director of Children All Around Mentoring Program and a proponent of the neat-and-clean look.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.