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By GARY DIAMOND | February 20, 1994
More than 33,000 whitetail deer were bagged by Maryland hunters during 1993's regular firearms season, the third highest total on record. In Harford County, hunters harvested 1,024 deer, most of which were taken during the season's first few days.Although a substantial number of hunters claim they enjoy the taste of venison, you'll often hear a different story from their spouses."Sure we eat venison at our house, but it's always tough and has a gamey taste," said a woman attending the Mid-Atlantic Hunting & Fishing Show at the Maryland State Fair Grounds.
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HEALTH
By Faith Hicks, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post. This week, Faith Hicks discusses seafood. When you imagine a typical summer barbecue, does your mind immediately turn to hot dogs, burgers, steak and ribs? That's hardly a menu endorsed by cardiologists. Try making your summer diet lower in saturated fat and higher in heart-healthy omega 3 fats by adding seafood to your grilling repertoire. Grilling seafood may seem intimidating at first.
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NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | November 28, 1999
Liquid marinades made with citrus juice, vinegar or wine are marvelous for breaking down the muscle fiber in tougher cuts of meat and for adding flavor. But here's the rub: Delicate fish can disintegrate in acidic liquids, and naturally tender cuts of meat need only a flavor boost -- not tenderizing.A better technique for flavoring such foods is to treat them to a gentle massage with dried herbs and spices.By making your own herb-and-spice rubs, you can custom-mix blends for beef, pork, lamb or fish.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | March 18, 2009
This simple fish dish comes from a new Weight Watchers cookbook that offers lean dinners in 20 minutes or less, and this recipe delivered. It also had the qualities that please my picky crowd at home: a pretty plain piece of fish, in this case, that one could dress up with a sauce or not. The catfish, on sale, also fit our budget. I was intrigued by the name, of course. The seasoning had a few of the elements of Old Bay Seasoning, including a dash of cayenne, which you can leave out if your kids are sensitive to spices.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | April 10, 1991
HERE'S A MEAL for two that's taken the stir-fry one step further. The recipe uses frozen vegetables and instant soup to make preparation a snap.In 30 minutes or less you can have this fast, satisfying meal on the table. Double the recipe to serve four.Instant cream of chicken soup mix makes a convenient seasoning base to showcase the Oriental flavors of this recipe, including soy sauce, garlic, ginger and crushed red pepper.This recipe is from Thomas J. Lipton Inc.Oriental Chicken with Vegetables1 tablespoon oil1/2 pound boneless chicken breasts, cut into thin strips1 1/2 cups frozen mixed vegetables, thawed2 envelopes instant cream of chicken flavor soup mix1 cup water2 teaspoons soy sauce1/4 teaspoon garlic powder1/4 teaspoon ground gingerDash crushed red pepperHot cooked rice, about two cupsIn medium skillet, heat oil and cook chicken until almost done; remove.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | March 18, 2009
This simple fish dish comes from a new Weight Watchers cookbook that offers lean dinners in 20 minutes or less, and this recipe delivered. It also had the qualities that please my picky crowd at home: a pretty plain piece of fish, in this case, that one could dress up with a sauce or not. The catfish, on sale, also fit our budget. I was intrigued by the name, of course. The seasoning had a few of the elements of Old Bay Seasoning, including a dash of cayenne, which you can leave out if your kids are sensitive to spices.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | May 1, 1991
Restaurants today throughout Maryland will help their customers shake the salt habit during the American Heart Association's "Great Salt-Out." Participating restaurants will remove salt shakers from their tables for the day to prove that food doesn't need excess salt to taste good. May is National High Blood Pressure Month."The Great Salt-Out reminds us that the first step in lowering high blood pressure in some people is taking the salt shaker off the table" according to Dr. Michael Kelemen, president of the Maryland affiliate of the American Heart Association.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | October 9, 1991
AS THE DAYS get cooler and shorter it's time for the ultimate comfort foods -- soup. This thick creamy soup uses sweet potatoes and white potatoes for a rich, hearty flavor. Best of all, it's low in calories and fat.Two Potato Soup4 cups chicken stock or broth1 tablespoon olive oil4 cups leeks, white part only, carefully washed and chopped1 teaspoon garlic, minced1/2 teaspoon ground red pepper2 cups white potatoes, cut into 1/2 -inch dice2 cups sweet potatoes, cut into 1/2 -inch dice1 teaspoon curry powder1/2 teaspoon garlic powderPinch turmeric to taste1 tablespoon lemon juiceFinely chopped red, green and yellow peppers for garnishHeat olive oil in a heavy-bottomed saucepan or dutch oven over medium heat.
FEATURES
September 26, 1990
Weeknight meals for busy families have three requirements: easy, quick and good tasting.But do you sometimes yearn for classic dishes, which often require lengthy preparation and long cooking?Some of those favorites can be streamlined for weeknight dining. Cassoulet, for example. This hearty bean stew inspired by the cooking of southwestern France is traditionally made with white beans, seasonings and one or more meats which cook long and slow.Our Quick Veal Cassoulet features flavors and ingredients reminiscent of the traditional dish, but it's prepared in about 30 minutes.
FEATURES
By Judith Blake and Judith Blake,Seattle Times | March 15, 1995
If you're hooked on fish, or would like to be, chances are you welcome fresh new ways to prepare it.And if you're among those who eat more fish during Lent that may be doubly true.Here's a fish-cooking method worth trying: Oven "frying." It delivers the taste appeal of deep-fat frying, but with less fat -- although the fat content varies considerably from recipe to recipe.The trick is to create a seasoned breading that adds crunch and flavor and helps keep the fish moist and succulent while it bakes.
NEWS
By Russ Parsons and Russ Parsons,Los Angeles Times | August 6, 2008
There are a couple of tricks to preparing ribs. I prefer spareribs to baby back, because they are a little fattier and don't dry out during long, slow cooking. But spareribs do need to be trimmed before the rub goes on. Still, that's not hard. First, cut away any excess fat or meat that isn't supported by a rib. You'll also notice there's a flap of meat that stretches diagonally across about half of the ribs. If you want, remove it; that way the meat will all be done about the same. (Cook the removed bit and the rest of the meaty scraps along with the ribs and you'll have a good griller's treat that will be done about halfway through the smoking period.
FEATURES
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 17, 2007
Eric Larson, owner of Marion Street Cheese Market outside Chicago, has fond memories of the cheese ball when his folks entertained. But he also knows that it has been shunned for many reasons -- not least of which is that many cheese balls of yore tasted as bad as they looked. It doesn't have to be that way. "Cheese purists think you shouldn't manipulate cheese like that," Larson said. "Other people think of it as not an exciting way to entertain." But Larson wants to bring the cheese ball back into everyone's good graces.
NEWS
By ROBIN MATHER JENKINS and ROBIN MATHER JENKINS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 25, 2006
This is the rub recipe that I developed after seven successive years of judging at the Memphis in May national barbecue contest. It's not authentically Southern because I'm no child of the South, but it has been called pretty doggoned good for a Yankee girl. We give oven instructions here (in case of inclement weather) but barbecue is usually cooked in a smoker or covered grill over indirect heat. It'll take about the same time. Consult your grill's instructions or visit a reliable outdoor-cooking Web site.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 8, 2006
Charlene Young of Bend, Ore., was looking for a recipe she used to have for "oven porcupines," which were meatballs made with a combination of ground meats and rice. Jamie Mansperger of Phoenix sent in a recipe that she has been using for more than 20 years. She said that she used to prepare them for her children and serve them with mashed potatoes and a green salad. Mansperger's recipe is for baked meatballs that are made using a classic meatloaf mix of beef, pork and veal. It was quick and easy to prepare and unlike other versions I received, you do not have to go to the trouble of browning the meatballs first.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Jim Coleman,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 8, 2004
What's the difference between au gratin potatoes and scalloped potatoes, and do you have a recipe for au gratin potatoes? I have bought both in box form and I don't think there is a difference between the two. First things first: Put the boxes back on the shelf and walk away from that aisle in the store. Now that we can breathe easier, let's get to your question. Yes, there is a difference between au gratin and scalloped potatoes. The key difference is in the "au gratin" part, because that term refers to foods topped with bread crumbs or cheese and then browned in the oven.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2003
Rose Henry of Columbia writes: "I hope you can help me find a lost recipe for Spanish rice. It was in Woman's World magazine, possibly about 1997 or '98. The magazine couldn't help and copies were not in the library, so you are my last resort." Mary Peterson of Ellicott City responded. "I hope my Spanish rice recipe will solve Rose Henry's request. I've no idea how old this recipe is, nor where I got it, but I know it is good - especially to make stuffed green peppers. Just fill them with Spanish rice, top with a slice of cheese and bake.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | February 27, 1991
Flavored mustards are one of the easiest, cheap tricks to ad flavor to quick-cooking sauces.Mustard, when used in the right quantity, can help bring out the flavor in food rather than overwhelm it. During the 1980s we learned to go beyond ballpark mustard to French Dijon. These days we know that each time a different mustard is used, the flavor changes even when the formula for sauce making remains the same.Some flavored mustards are available in the supermarket, but the more exotic varieties come from the gourmet store.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 15, 1993
Several days ago, our son Michael, who works in Boston, called with an ourgent culinary request. Everyone in his office, it seems, was in a holiday spirit and had been bringing homemade sweets and savories to work during the past week. There was an air of conviviality at lunch and at breaks when people enjoyed sampling these treats.Mike wanted to make a contribution, too, but because of his hectic schedule, he did not have much free time for marketing or vTC cooking. He asked if I could suggest an easy recipe that could be made in less than an hour.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2001
Susan Harrell of Eldersburg requested a "Hash-Brown Casserole like the one served at the Cracker Barrel." Her response came from Edith Patro of Elkton, who also added some recipe information about the book her recipe came from. She wrote, "Perhaps your readers would be interested in a book entitled `Top Secret Restaurant Recipes,' published by Penguin Group. It's a book of `knockoffs' of recipes from fast-food chains, and you can't tell the difference. It includes things like the Outback Steakhouse Bloomin' Onion, the Hard Rock CafM-i Baby Rock Watermelon Ribs, Houlihan's 'Shrooms, Lone Star Amarillo Cheese Fries, Planet Hollywood Pot Stickers, Red Lobster Stuffed Shrimp and lots more.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2000
Elberta Johnson of Albany, Ore., requested a recipe for Blue-Cheese Salad Dressing. Donna Bullen of Baltimore responded with a recipe for Chart House Blue-Cheese Dressing, which was tester Laura Reiley's choice. "This recipe was published on a card that the restaurant distributed," Bullen says. Chart House Blue-Cheese Dressing Makes 2 1/2 cups 3/4 cup sour cream 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard 1/2 teaspoon black pepper 1/2 teaspoon salt, scant 1/3 teaspoon garlic powder, scant 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce 1 1/3 cups mayonnaise 4 ounces crumbled imported Danish blue cheese Combine sour cream, dry mustard, black pepper, salt, garlic powder and Worcestershire in the bowl of a food processor or blender.
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