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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
Why are my garlic cloves brown? I grow it from certified disease-free heads and rotate the garlic to avoid disease. We see from your photo that you've cut off the stem and roots. We suspect the garlic is not curing sufficiently before you store it. When you harvest, air-dry the garlic out of doors, out of direct sun, with the leaves, stems, and roots intact, for one to two weeks. Store retaining at least 4-6 inches of the stem and also the root. You can tie them into bunches to hang in your basement and have garlic all winter.
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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
Why are my garlic cloves brown? I grow it from certified disease-free heads and rotate the garlic to avoid disease. We see from your photo that you've cut off the stem and roots. We suspect the garlic is not curing sufficiently before you store it. When you harvest, air-dry the garlic out of doors, out of direct sun, with the leaves, stems, and roots intact, for one to two weeks. Store retaining at least 4-6 inches of the stem and also the root. You can tie them into bunches to hang in your basement and have garlic all winter.
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By MIKE KLINGAMAN | October 11, 1992
October is the month of ghosts and goblins, of witches and vampires. In short, it's a good time to plant garlic.Garlic long has been a pungent tool to ward off evil spirits. Garliplays the same role in the garden, defending plants against aphids and other insects that would suck the lifeblood from my FTC crops, Dracula-style.But garlic's reputation against vampires and garden vermihardly warrants its recent surge in popularity. America's consumption of fresh garlic has doubled in a decade as modern medicine confirms what the ancients knew: Garlic is good for what ails you.The Greeks and Romans prescribed it for wounds and infectionsA Babylonian ruler had 400,000 bushels of the stuff delivered to court.
SPORTS
August 26, 2013
(Courtesy of Jenny Perez) 6 to 8 medium sized round zucchinis (You can use regular zucchinis just cut them in half and hollow out the center.) Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Wash the zucchinis. Cut the tops about one quarter inch thick. Using a melon baller or small spoon to hollow out the center, leaving a shell one quarter inch thick. Chop the center and reserve. Place the sliced-off tops and the zucchinis on a baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and salt and massage to coat the zucchinis.
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By MIKE KLINGAMAN | February 27, 1994
My first act of spring is a real no-brainer: Dig a shallow hole, drop in a clove of garlic and walk away. No pain, big gain. Come fall, that sliver of garlic will have grown into a handsome bulb, just waiting to be minced in a meat dish.It's that simple. Garlic is so easy to grow, you'd have to be batty not to have it in your garden. Unless you're a vampire.Garlic is the perfect plant for rookie gardeners, an idiot-proof choice for beginners. Even those who mistakenly plant the cloves upside-down, as I once did, are rewarded with harvests: The topsy-turvy garlic somehow manages to right itself underground, a remarkable feat for a legendary herb.
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By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
Many of us grew up thinking that green beans came from a can. Those soft and water-logged beans were all we knew until we had our eyes were opened up to the true flavor of string beans (the name covers haricot verts, wax beans and green beans) that were fresh and properly cooked. But the problem is how to cook them differently. While steaming in a pan or boiling in salted water work well, it can get a little monotonous. So this time, try grilling. The dry heat evaporates the water inside the beans and concentrates the flavor while also picking up char from the flame.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | April 8, 2001
Q. I've had high blood pressure since 1985 and have taken many drugs, including Vasotec, Maxzide and others. All of them have side effects such as dry mouth or hair loss, and none has been effective at getting my lower number below 90. About two years ago, I heard about taking garlic for blood pressure. I take two pills a day. For more than a year, my blood pressure has been around 135 / 80. I swear by garlic, even though the doctors say it's not very effective. A. Preliminary research in animals and humans suggests that garlic may have a modest effect, especially on diastolic blood pressure (the lower number)
NEWS
By JOE GRAEDON, AND TERESA GRAEDON PH.D. and JOE GRAEDON, AND TERESA GRAEDON PH.D.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 14, 1999
Q. As a physician I usually enjoy your column, but I have serious questions about your claims about garlic. What is the evidence that "Egyptian physicians used garlic"? Even if they did, is that a good reason for us to use it? How do you know that garlic can help prevent blood clots or that it has cancer-fighting properties?I enjoy the flavor of garlic, but I am skeptical about its ability to prevent cancer or heart attacks. Please back up your statements.A. The Ebers Papyrus from 1550 B.C. mentions 22 herbal remedies containing garlic.
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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 1, 2001
Marilyn Glenville, one of the United Kingdom's leading nutritional therapists and author of Natural Alternatives to HRT Cookbook: Understanding Estrogen and Foods That Benefit Your Health (Ten Speed Press, $17.95), specializes in the natural approach to female hormone problems. Glenville researched the diets of healthy women worldwide. For instance, studies have shown Japanese women have later and less stressful menopauses and a lower rate of breast cancer. "Therefore the question arises as to what most differentiates these women from us in the Western world," says Glenville.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | July 19, 1995
The spotlight is on sweet potatoes, pecans and garlic, not together but in two different and wonderful recipes -- a pie and a sauce.The sauce, Skordalia, is an excellent addition to a fish dish, to vegetables or as a vegetable dip. Mary Diab of Baltimore, who asked for the recipe, noted it was made with "garlic and more garlic."Kari Zipf of Waitsburg, Wash., sent in two recipes for Skordalia, both of which were chosen by Chef Gilles Syglowski, who judged them as "excellent and more excellent."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette,
The Baltimore Sun
| July 15, 2013
In my continuing attempt to eat only what is already in my fridge and pantry all week, this recipe, which I found in WomenHeart's All Heart Family Cookbook (Rodale, 2008), appealed to me because I knew I could adapt it easily. The original recipe was called "Happy Heart Pasta Primavera" and included shrimp, tomatoes and broccoli. Since I didn't have those items, I decided to increase the amounts of some of the other ingredients, like onions and carrots.  I imagine the original recipe is really delicious, because this scaled-back version was pretty good, too, for a simple Sunday night supper.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
My first thought when I found a garlic scapes dip recipe, which ran in the New York Times several years ago, was this: I bet this dip would be great with homemade pita chips. My second thought was this: Making homemade pita chips means cleaning my big baking sheets, which is not one of my favorite tasks, so maybe I can find some pita chips at Wegmans. Garlic scapes, in case you don't know, as I didn't before I owned some, are the green, curly shoots of a garlic plant. They taste like garlic, but not as intensely as a garlic bulb.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
Many of us grew up thinking that green beans came from a can. Those soft and water-logged beans were all we knew until we had our eyes were opened up to the true flavor of string beans (the name covers haricot verts, wax beans and green beans) that were fresh and properly cooked. But the problem is how to cook them differently. While steaming in a pan or boiling in salted water work well, it can get a little monotonous. So this time, try grilling. The dry heat evaporates the water inside the beans and concentrates the flavor while also picking up char from the flame.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
Portside Tavern in Canton has a new chef, Freddie Melgar. Melgar, who worked for Washington, D.C.'s Madhatter Group and the northern Virginia-based Great American Restaurants, has introduced a new Prince Island mussels menu. The newly released menu features six preparations including the "Mostard," with spicy bison sausage, leeks, Dijon and thyme broth; the "Jalfrezzi" with red pepper, onion, garlic, curry, tomato and coconut milk and the "Baltimore," with Old Bay, garlic, herbs and IPA beer broth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2011
The key to the perfect tailgating offering is impressing your fellow sports fans with foods that are flavorful and hearty. When you're a gourmet chef like Cinghiale's Julian Marucci, using fresh ingredients helps give classics a fresh spin. "You want to impress people by showing them different types of food that people wouldn't usually make," said Marucci, the 28-year-old executive chef for the Harbor East Italian restaurant. "It comes down to seasoning, execution and technique.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
The Dogwood sent over its new four-course summer "market" menu. It goes for $45, and a vegetarian version goes for $40. A 4-ounce pour of wine with each course can be added for $25. Have a look. First course: Golden and red heirloom tomato gazpacho with local lump crab meat, garnished with local lump crabmeat. (Vegetarian: garnished with heirloom vegetable escabeche) Second Course: Pan-seared Virginia “day boat” scallops,Iowa prosciutto, grilled zucchini succotash, roasted garlic-canellini puree Vegetarian: One Straw Farm sweet bell pepper stuffed with quinoa “tabouleh”, spicy piquillo pepper coulis Third Course:: Lightly smoked pan-roasted duck breast with stoneground white grits, blueberry barbeque Vegetarian: baked local squash and eggplant ratatoullie tian, garlic sauteed greens,  pistou broth.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | July 27, 1994
Q: Many recipes call for garlic to be diced, which I find to be a tedious process. Why can't I just crush it?A: Food purists may tell you that crushing garlic or using a garlic press will give a bitter garlic flavor due to the extreme breakdown of the cell walls. However, if you find the flavor to be acceptable, by all means, use a garlic press. The time saved is well worth it.Q: I have never been able to figure out how to make soft bread crumbs. What's the secret?A: The best trick to making soft bread crumbs (or bread crumbs from fresh bread)
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | April 2, 1997
What you get: 6.6 ounces (9 servings)Cost: $1.09Tlme to prepare: 3 1/2 minutes to microwave 4 servings; about 5 minutes stove-top.Review: I still view instant mashed potatoes as space-aged food, something probably developed for the Apollo missions. But new flavors like garlic and sour cream and chives lured me to my grocer's display. I like Hungry Jack's convenience: They mix the flavoring with the potato flakes, then pack them loosely into the box, so you can prepare as much as you'd like at a time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2011
The entrance into Joey Chiu's — a wide wooden bridge spanning a rapid stream — is bewitchingly pretty. I can't think of a restaurant that makes a better first impression. I felt just as good about Joey Chiu's when I left. Charming is as charming does. Joey Chiu's occupies what is actually an addition on the back of a drab building. The building is drab, but the addition is swell. If you ran a restaurant, the structure's clean, contemporary lines and dramatic wall of windows might inspire you to cram it full of midcentury modern furniture.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2011
When people tell me how much they like Bluestone, they stop short of gushing. They talk about Bluestone in terms of satisfaction, what a consistent and reliable place it is, but they don't use many superlatives when they do. Partly I think they're worried I'll be bored by Bluestone's straight-ahead American cuisine, but mostly I think they're concerned about whether I'll respond to Bluestone's industrial park setting. No one has anything bad to say about Bluestone either. It seems to be everybody's fourth or sixth favorite restaurant, which means, essentially, that Bluestone is crowded all the time.
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