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Gargoyles

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BUSINESS
By Mary T. McCarthy and Mary T. McCarthy,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 1997
It's a jungle out there.Downtown Baltimore buildings are home to a variety of architectural creatures that peer down at passers-by, seemingly protecting the structures where they reside.Nowadays pedestrians seem to pay little attention to the devilish creatures scattered throughout the city, but with Halloween approaching, some can't help but look up at the gargoyles.Gargoyles are often-misunderstood creatures. Many people think of gargoyles as a hunched-over creepy beasts with wings.While they are often carved in this grotesque fashion, gargoyles are often functional architectural details that serve as waterspouts, projecting from the roof gutter of a building and sometimes spewing water through their mouths.
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NEWS
By PHOTOS BY JED KIRSCHBAUM and PHOTOS BY JED KIRSCHBAUM,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | October 31, 2005
Trick-or-treaters will don whimsical and scary costumes this evening before stalking Baltimore's streets for chocolate and sugary snacks. But observing these activities from their permanent posts will be mythological creatures and seemingly sentient animals. Architects and builders have employed gargoyles and grotesques on numerous buildings across Baltimore. Gargoyles, which date to at least the early 13th century, often act as waterspouts but are appreciated as decoration - if you can actually get close enough to see them well.
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FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1996
Leave it to the Disney happy police to transform a medieval icon as ugly as sin into a comedic chorus line of wisecracking, lovable stone-phonies.When the animated version of Victor Hugo's epic "Hunchback of Notre Dame" premieres tomorrow, audiences will meet one gargoyle and two "gar-boys" who strut and quip their way through eternity while offering misguided advice to Quasimodo, a deformed bell ringer by profession.The trio, named Victor, Hugo and Laverne, are respectively characterized in a Disney press kit as "hedonistic," "stodgy" and "crotchety -- but caring."
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2000
Looking jurors in the eye and holding note cards in one hand, Brad Booker delivered a closing argument worthy of any attorney. He reminded the jury what the civil case was about - a child badly injured in an accidental shooting, his father suing for damages. Booker cited the relevant law. He argued that all adults with guns must know "exactly" where the firearms are stored or risk liability. Then the 11-year-old sat down amid a gaggle of other boys and girls, ending his week of "law school" at Howard Community College's summer program for young people.
NEWS
By PHOTOS BY JED KIRSCHBAUM and PHOTOS BY JED KIRSCHBAUM,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | October 31, 2005
Trick-or-treaters will don whimsical and scary costumes this evening before stalking Baltimore's streets for chocolate and sugary snacks. But observing these activities from their permanent posts will be mythological creatures and seemingly sentient animals. Architects and builders have employed gargoyles and grotesques on numerous buildings across Baltimore. Gargoyles, which date to at least the early 13th century, often act as waterspouts but are appreciated as decoration - if you can actually get close enough to see them well.
FEATURES
January 3, 2000
Author and illustrator David Macaulay (pictured) yakked with us while on tour for the 25th celebration of his book, "Cathedral." David -- famous for his books about building things, from cathedrals to castles -- has a new book out called "Building the Book: Cathedral." David chose to make architecture his career, only it wasn't much fun for him. So he decided to write a fantasy story about gargoyles -- those funny, weird stone creatures on old buildings. But David's editor liked his drawing of a cathedral and suggested he do a book on the making of a cathedral.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | March 7, 1994
OXFORD, England -- Gargoyles and grotesques glare, grimace and grin from the hallowed buildings of this old university town like a horde of uneasy spirits trapped forever in stone.Hundreds, even thousands, of these twisted faces and writhing figures punctuate the collegiate facades like footnotes to a long architectural thesis. They line the walls of Balliol and All Souls and Brasenose and Christ Church and Magdalen and New College -- weathering galleries of wild things and weird beasties.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1998
In sleepy, historic Shady Side, one waterfront home sticks out like an Andy Warhol abstract on a wall full of Rembrandts.Neighbors call the house hideous, bizarre, out-of-place. Creepy.The house's owner calls his neighbors uncompromising, old-fashioned, unimaginative. Racist.Insults are flying here in southern Anne Arundel County. Feelings are hurt. And a neighborhood barbecue is simply out of the question.Welcome to West Shady Side Road. Home to some of the oldest houses in this tiny peninsula town.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | November 19, 1992
No one would want to meet one of John Bottomley's creations on a dark night."I like gargoyles," he said. "They definitely grow on you."Mr. Bottomley, who has indulged in the art of making the hideous figures for the last three years, will show how he makes his grotesquely deformed human- and animal-like creations Friday through Sunday during the New Windsor Holiday Open House.He will be one of five craftsmen demonstrating skills at Customs Last Stand and Rustic Furniture, two Marston craft shops participating in the event.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1997
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -- Defending Busch Grand National champion Randy LaJoie could afford to be joyful yesterday afternoon after winning the Gargoyles 300 and a record payoff of $76,284. But the happiest driver on the track might have been Daytona rookie and pole-sitter Elliott Sadler.Sadler got caught in a wreck on Lap 45 and ran the rest of the 120-lap race without a right-front quarter panel. On the final lap, he ran out of gas and had to coast to the finish line to finish 16th.With the rest of the field on pit row on its way to the garage, Sadler's Chevrolet inched noiselessly along the front stretch.
FEATURES
January 3, 2000
Author and illustrator David Macaulay (pictured) yakked with us while on tour for the 25th celebration of his book, "Cathedral." David -- famous for his books about building things, from cathedrals to castles -- has a new book out called "Building the Book: Cathedral." David chose to make architecture his career, only it wasn't much fun for him. So he decided to write a fantasy story about gargoyles -- those funny, weird stone creatures on old buildings. But David's editor liked his drawing of a cathedral and suggested he do a book on the making of a cathedral.
NEWS
By Kirsten Scharnberg and Kirsten Scharnberg,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1998
In sleepy, historic Shady Side, one waterfront home sticks out like an Andy Warhol abstract on a wall full of Rembrandts.Neighbors call the house hideous, bizarre, out-of-place. Creepy.The house's owner calls his neighbors uncompromising, old-fashioned, unimaginative. Racist.Insults are flying here in southern Anne Arundel County. Feelings are hurt. And a neighborhood barbecue is simply out of the question.Welcome to West Shady Side Road. Home to some of the oldest houses in this tiny peninsula town.
BUSINESS
By Mary T. McCarthy and Mary T. McCarthy,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 1997
It's a jungle out there.Downtown Baltimore buildings are home to a variety of architectural creatures that peer down at passers-by, seemingly protecting the structures where they reside.Nowadays pedestrians seem to pay little attention to the devilish creatures scattered throughout the city, but with Halloween approaching, some can't help but look up at the gargoyles.Gargoyles are often-misunderstood creatures. Many people think of gargoyles as a hunched-over creepy beasts with wings.While they are often carved in this grotesque fashion, gargoyles are often functional architectural details that serve as waterspouts, projecting from the roof gutter of a building and sometimes spewing water through their mouths.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1997
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. -- Defending Busch Grand National champion Randy LaJoie could afford to be joyful yesterday afternoon after winning the Gargoyles 300 and a record payoff of $76,284. But the happiest driver on the track might have been Daytona rookie and pole-sitter Elliott Sadler.Sadler got caught in a wreck on Lap 45 and ran the rest of the 120-lap race without a right-front quarter panel. On the final lap, he ran out of gas and had to coast to the finish line to finish 16th.With the rest of the field on pit row on its way to the garage, Sadler's Chevrolet inched noiselessly along the front stretch.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1996
Leave it to the Disney happy police to transform a medieval icon as ugly as sin into a comedic chorus line of wisecracking, lovable stone-phonies.When the animated version of Victor Hugo's epic "Hunchback of Notre Dame" premieres tomorrow, audiences will meet one gargoyle and two "gar-boys" who strut and quip their way through eternity while offering misguided advice to Quasimodo, a deformed bell ringer by profession.The trio, named Victor, Hugo and Laverne, are respectively characterized in a Disney press kit as "hedonistic," "stodgy" and "crotchety -- but caring."
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | March 7, 1994
OXFORD, England -- Gargoyles and grotesques glare, grimace and grin from the hallowed buildings of this old university town like a horde of uneasy spirits trapped forever in stone.Hundreds, even thousands, of these twisted faces and writhing figures punctuate the collegiate facades like footnotes to a long architectural thesis. They line the walls of Balliol and All Souls and Brasenose and Christ Church and Magdalen and New College -- weathering galleries of wild things and weird beasties.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2000
Looking jurors in the eye and holding note cards in one hand, Brad Booker delivered a closing argument worthy of any attorney. He reminded the jury what the civil case was about - a child badly injured in an accidental shooting, his father suing for damages. Booker cited the relevant law. He argued that all adults with guns must know "exactly" where the firearms are stored or risk liability. Then the 11-year-old sat down amid a gaggle of other boys and girls, ending his week of "law school" at Howard Community College's summer program for young people.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Barry and Dan Barry,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 29, 2005
NEW YORK - It rises like a glistening flute of champagne from the beer-bottle skyline, as if in toast to a New Year's mix of emotions: hope and loss; love found and love betrayed; what can be and what almost was. And when you see it, you know instantly, absolutely, where the movie wants you to be. Ah, the Chrysler Building: Manhattan. Not even the Empire State Building is as immediately identifiable, or can say so much so quickly. Shimmering in the morning sun or under spotlight beams at midnight, the 1930 Chrysler Building, which marked its 75th anniversary Friday, can evoke everything from East Side sophistication to Big City hollowness.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | November 19, 1992
No one would want to meet one of John Bottomley's creations on a dark night."I like gargoyles," he said. "They definitely grow on you."Mr. Bottomley, who has indulged in the art of making the hideous figures for the last three years, will show how he makes his grotesquely deformed human- and animal-like creations Friday through Sunday during the New Windsor Holiday Open House.He will be one of five craftsmen demonstrating skills at Customs Last Stand and Rustic Furniture, two Marston craft shops participating in the event.
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