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By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
A 26-year-old man was shot and killed outside his Gardenville home late Sunday night, city police said. Adam Robinson of the 4100 block of Idaho Avenue, near Belair Road, answered his door bell about 11 p.m., police said. He walked outside and was shot multiple times. He was pronounced dead at Johns Hopkins Hospital about 11:30 p.m., police said. Police have no suspects at this time and are continuing to investigate. Mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
Bernadette M. Ridenour, a homemaker and former stenographer, died Wednesday of dementia at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 88. The daughter of Louis and Elsie Intlekofer, German immigrant bakers, Bernadette Marie Intlekofer was born in Baltimore and raised on Federal Street in East Baltimore. After graduating from Catholic High School in 1944, in the school's second graduating class, she worked as a secretary for a Baltimore Insurance company. In 1947, she married William F. Ridenour, a World War II veteran who later was yardmaster of the old Pennsylvania Railroad's Bayview Yard in East Baltimore.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 13, 2004
Vandals broke into a portable classroom at Gardenville Elementary School before the start of the school day yesterday, leaving a mess of ruined schoolbooks and furniture and urine on the floor. Fourth-grade teacher Valerie Belton said she was devastated to discover the havoc in her classroom, which she had renovated over the summer with furniture donated by IKEA in White Marsh. "I just stood in the middle of the floor and started crying," said Belton, who had relished surprising her pupils with the new bookshelves, carpets and colorful bear-shaped armchairs.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Herman L. "Dinky" Wockenfuss, a Northeast Baltimore candy maker whose family's much-sought-after confections have been tempting candy lovers and expanding waistlines for nearly a century, died Monday of heart failure at his Kingsville home. He was 92. The son of Herman Charles Wockenfuss and Ryda B. Hudson Wockenfuss, Herman Lee Wockenfuss was born in Baltimore and raised in Gardenville. His father, an immigrant from West Prussia, came to Baltimore in 1887. He established the Wockenfuss Candy Co. in a Chase Street building.
SPORTS
By CHRIS ZANG | May 3, 2005
IF YOU hold it, they will come. From blocks away and states away, they came to salute Bill Grace, who for the past 50 years has been coaching the youths of Northeast Baltimore. The domain of "Mr. Bill" isn't a field of dreams, however. It's a court of dreams. Though admittedly never a basketball "player," Grace could always coach the sport with the best and nearly 150 of his former players, friends and family members gathered Sunday to salute the man who made quality basketball and Gardenville Recreation Center synonymous.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | May 3, 1993
Last summer, when Tim Bayer's neighborhood library in Gardenville was only open three days a week because of money problems, the fifth-grader put on a backyard carnival that raised $42.Afterward, Tim wondered what to do with the cash.He decided to give it to branch No. 26 of the Enoch Pratt Free Library at 5427 Belair Road, a few blocks from his Antanna Avenue home.Last week, with his bike chained to the railing outside the Northeast Baltimore library, Tim sat in the children's department and explained his decision.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | August 13, 2008
Helen M. Phillips, a homemaker and longtime Gardenville resident, died Wednesdayof a brain hemorrhage at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 95. Born Helen Mary Brocki at home on South Dallas Street, Mrs. Phillips was the eldest of eight children and raised in East Baltimore. She attended St. Patrick's parochial school until the eighth grade and then went to work picking produce at farms in Anne Arundel and Harford counties. "She recalled when labor inspectors arrived at the farm, the foreman would blow a whistle, and all the young children would hide in the canneries," said a daughter, Elaine Lutche of Bel Air. During the 1920s, she worked in Baltimore's garment district at Thanhouser & Weiller - a manufacturer of shirts, overalls and children's playsuits - packing clothes for shipment.
BUSINESS
By Charles Belfoure and Charles Belfoure,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 26, 1999
Gardenville is so named because it actually was once Baltimore's garden. It was the premier truck farming region where the city got most of its fruits and vegetables.Houses now stand where tomatoes and beans once grew at Belair and Moravia roads. But this coming spring the community will be getting a new and very unique kind of garden. A labyrinth walk and meditation garden will be built in front of St. Anthony of Padua's Roman Catholic Convent on Frankford Avenue."It's part of a program called `Sacred Places -- Open Spaces' which attempts to put places of peace and beauty in urban areas," said Gloria Carpeneto, a pastoral associate.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 31, 2004
The director of the Ashland Head Start program in Gardenville was indicted this month on charges that she stole $335,777 from the organization over a four-year period. A Baltimore grand jury indicted Audrey Marie James, 49, on Dec. 15, charging that she had diverted money into an unauthorized bank account from June 30, 2000, to July 21 of this year. During that time, she ran the Head Start program in the 5400 block of Belair Road. Head Start is a federally funded program for preschool children from low-income families.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 20, 2001
Baltimore will be a great town if they ever reopen it. How can an agency that cannot protect its own weapons and computers safeguard the nation's security. Library policy is not about saving Gardenville or Park Heights ot Baltimore City. Its mission is to save the Enoch Pratt Free Library, unless someone provides wherewithal to fulfill another mission. What Greenspan really says is that he doesn't know, either.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2012
Last year, Aaron Marchanti invited his father to the annual Memorial Day ceremony at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens. On Monday, he returned to the event to honor him. Maj. Robert J. Marchanti II, a member of the Maryland National Guard who went to Afghanistan to help train that country's security forces, was shot to death inside a ministry building in Kabul in February. The Baltimore County man was one of seven Marylanders remembered Monday at the cemetery in Timonium. "Memorial Day was always important growing up because my dad's been in the military my whole life," Aaron Marchanti said.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
A 26-year-old man was shot and killed outside his Gardenville home late Sunday night, city police said. Adam Robinson of the 4100 block of Idaho Avenue, near Belair Road, answered his door bell about 11 p.m., police said. He walked outside and was shot multiple times. He was pronounced dead at Johns Hopkins Hospital about 11:30 p.m., police said. Police have no suspects at this time and are continuing to investigate. Mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2012
Sister Marie Immaculate Fay, who taught in Baltimore parochial schools, died of cardiopulmonary collapse March 22 at her order's retirement home in Aston, Pa. She was 82. Born Margaret Mary Fay in Dublin, Ireland, she attended public schools in Harrisburg, Pa. She entered the Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia in 1951 and professed her first vows in 1953. She earned a bachelor of arts in history at Neumann University in Aston. She began teaching at St. Anthony's School in Gardenville in 1952 and later served at the Shrine of the Little Flower in Belair-Edison, St. Catherine of Siena in East Baltimore and Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Essex.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
Funeral services for Maj. Robert J. Marchanti II, an Army National Guard officer killed Feb. 25 in Afghanistan, are set for today at Trinity Assembly of God Church in Lutherville. The 48-year-old major left his Gardenville home in September on his first deployment to the war-torn country. He had been working on training programs with the Afghan national police, when he and Lt. Col. John D. Loftis of Kentucky were shot to death inside the National Police Coordination Center, a ministry building in the heart of Kabul, the nation's capital.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
Maj. Gen. James A. Adkins, the commander of the Maryland National Guard, visited with Maj. Robert J. Marchanti II last fall as he drilled at an Army base in Virginia. "He was so proud of his soldiers and what they had accomplished," Adkins said Thursday at a Fallen Warrior Memorial Service for the slain guardsman. "When we were out on the rifle range, I watched him work the firing line much like a coach would work the sideline at a football game. "For some of us, we have to work hard at leadership.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 18, 2010
Three men were shot early Thursday inside a bar in the Gardenville neighborhood of Northeast Baltimore, according to city police. An officer on patrol heard the gunshots about 12:30 a.m. from Club Uzo in the 4800 block of Belair Road. He and other officers went inside and found a 20-year-old man who had been shot once in the leg. He was taken to Johns Hopkins Hospital in serious condition. Police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said officers found a second victim on Belair Road, just outside the bar's front entrance, also suffering from a gunshot wound to the leg. The 30-year-old was also taken to Hopkins in serious condition.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Herman L. "Dinky" Wockenfuss, a Northeast Baltimore candy maker whose family's much-sought-after confections have been tempting candy lovers and expanding waistlines for nearly a century, died Monday of heart failure at his Kingsville home. He was 92. The son of Herman Charles Wockenfuss and Ryda B. Hudson Wockenfuss, Herman Lee Wockenfuss was born in Baltimore and raised in Gardenville. His father, an immigrant from West Prussia, came to Baltimore in 1887. He established the Wockenfuss Candy Co. in a Chase Street building.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | March 2, 1995
Sophie M. Young Appler, a retired bakery official who was active in church affairs, died Saturday of cancer at the home of her daughter in Pikesville. She was 88.The longtime Gardenville resident retired in 1971 after 44 years as accounts receivable manager for Schmidt Baking Co.After her retirement, she volunteered for several years at a day care center near Patterson Park.She was born and reared on Curley Street in East Baltimore. The family lived above the bakery that her German immigrant parents had established.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | May 23, 2009
Margaret M. "Marge" Cannington, a retired secretary and avid boater and dancer, died of Alzheimer's disease May 15 at an assisted-living facility in Jennersville, Pa. The former longtime Gardenville resident was 88. Margaret Mary Tenley was born in Baltimore and raised on Washington Street. After graduating from Eastern High School in 1939, she went to work as a secretary at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River. Shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor, she was married to Gordon Eugene "Ken" Cannington, a Marine.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | August 13, 2008
Helen M. Phillips, a homemaker and longtime Gardenville resident, died Wednesdayof a brain hemorrhage at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 95. Born Helen Mary Brocki at home on South Dallas Street, Mrs. Phillips was the eldest of eight children and raised in East Baltimore. She attended St. Patrick's parochial school until the eighth grade and then went to work picking produce at farms in Anne Arundel and Harford counties. "She recalled when labor inspectors arrived at the farm, the foreman would blow a whistle, and all the young children would hide in the canneries," said a daughter, Elaine Lutche of Bel Air. During the 1920s, she worked in Baltimore's garment district at Thanhouser & Weiller - a manufacturer of shirts, overalls and children's playsuits - packing clothes for shipment.
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