Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGarden State
IN THE NEWS

Garden State

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Kathy Hudson hudmud@aol.com | July 10, 2014
My sister and I recently spent five days at Ocean City, New Jersey. In early childhood summers, thanks to our grandparents, we spent months there. As we grew older, they took us traveling. Beach months dwindled to weeks, then days. The imprint of those early years is strong. In summer, what I now enjoy most is what I enjoyed in childhood: learning to ride a two-wheel bike, riding on the boardwalk and flat beach sidewalks, walking down the street to the beach and swimming in the ocean, eating fresh fruit and vegetables for dinner, eating ice cream later, playing cards and board games, having my first library card and spending time at the library, riding the rides and meeting up with friends.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kathy Hudson hudmud@aol.com | July 10, 2014
My sister and I recently spent five days at Ocean City, New Jersey. In early childhood summers, thanks to our grandparents, we spent months there. As we grew older, they took us traveling. Beach months dwindled to weeks, then days. The imprint of those early years is strong. In summer, what I now enjoy most is what I enjoyed in childhood: learning to ride a two-wheel bike, riding on the boardwalk and flat beach sidewalks, walking down the street to the beach and swimming in the ocean, eating fresh fruit and vegetables for dinner, eating ice cream later, playing cards and board games, having my first library card and spending time at the library, riding the rides and meeting up with friends.
Advertisement
TRAVEL
By Charles Jacobs and Charles Jacobs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 2, 2004
It took more than just its famous tomato to dub New Jersey the Garden State. Although today it is the most densely populated state in the Union, New Jersey has never forsaken its love affair with nature that marked the region's bucolic beginnings. Every year, visitors from in-state and beyond discover that secret as the state's gardens burst into bloom. Tucked away from the hubbub of its cities and the Turnpike are 125 public gardens and arboretums offering getaways to please every member of the family.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | March 5, 2010
In these times of economic distress, massive job losses, shrunken businesses, bloated governments and runaway public spending, we've been waiting for some politician (other than Ron Paul) to stand and tell the truth. Politicians excel at "kicking the can down the road" -- that is, postponing the inevitable reckoning for unsustainable spending until they are either safely out of office or dead. But behold! The newly elected governor of New Jersey, Republican Chris Christie, stood in front of 200 of his state's mayors last week and told them basically that there is no more road down which to kick that proverbial can. In his speech at the New Jersey League of Municipalities, Mr. Christie began by calling the legislature's $29 billion budget something out of "Alice in Wonderland."
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | July 4, 1992
Mrs. Adelaide Riggs has long been a stalwart of Maryland racing.She has raised thoroughbreds for more than 50 years at her Happy Retreat Farm in Woodbine, continuing and then expanding the operation after the death of her husband, Augustus Riggs IV, a renowned fox hunter and professional horseman.But even Mrs. Riggs said she's never had a day of racing quite like yesterday.Not only did her newly-acquired 2-year-old colt, Wild Zone, win the Primer Breeders' Cup Stakes at Laurel Race Course, but her 4-year-old filly, Dhaka, also won the $40,000 Regret Handicap at Monmouth Park, and another one of her runners, Casting a Spell, won Laurel's third race.
NEWS
July 28, 1996
Joseph Culmone Sr., 65, a Hall of Fame jockey who rode Prince Siam to a $311,000 first-place finish in the Garden State Stakes in 1965, died of natural causes Tuesday at his Cherry Hill, N.J. home.With his $31,000 share of the Garden State Stakes -- the richest race in the world that year -- Mr. Culmone bought a house in Laurel, where he would raise a family for the next 25 years.Mr. Culmone was born in 1931 in Delia, Sicily and immigrated to America as a teen-ager. He quickly became a winning jockey on the New Jersey, Florida and Maryland circuits, riding more than 3,000 winners in a career that spanned from 1949 to 1972.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Staff | August 4, 2005
From his rapid rise to the peak of pop with Men at Work in the '80s to his fall into the "Where are They Now" file in the '90s, Colin Hay has tasted both sides of the music industry. All the while, his music kept its honesty and tenderness -- qualities often overlooked by mainstream fans. That all changed when actor Zach Braff took notice and tacked Hay's "Beautiful World" on the Scrubs soundtrack and "I Just Don't Think I'll Ever Get Over You" on the Garden State soundtrack. Hay plays the Recher Theatre Saturday and Rams Head Tavern Sunday.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | February 5, 1994
The sale of the Manfuso brothers' stock in Laurel and Pimlico race courses to Joe De Francis, his sister Karin Van Dyke and Martin Jacobs was finalized yesterday in Baltimore."
SPORTS
By Bill Finley and Bill Finley,New York Daily News | June 18, 1992
What is a racetrack?This is not a trick question, only a difficult one. Time is up. . . in 1992, what is a racetrack?Twenty-five years ago, the answer was simple: a place that ran races for horses for a short period of time during the year and took parimutuel betting at the track; a place that was popular, uncomplicated and successful.That definition obviously no longer applies, but what does? Who can say? The rules seem to change by the day.In the months ahead, the definition of a New Jersey racetrack will undergo considerable change.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 20, 2004
Garden State is filled with characters you long to know more about, in situations to which almost anyone can relate. And that's as near a can't-miss movie formula as one can get. Writer-director-star Zach Braff, heretofore best known as a cast member of the TV sitcom Scrubs, has constructed a witty, literate and delicately insightful little gem of a movie about a prodigal son making tentative reconnections to his family, and in the process discovering he's...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun movie critic | September 8, 2006
Zach Braff is in a period of transition. And loving every minute of it. Last year, Garden State, his first film as a writer and director, became an unexpected critical and commercial hit. The film, about a troubled (and medicated) son returning home and discovering he's not nearly as messed up as he's been told, garnered largely positive reviews and pulled in $26.7 million at the U.S. box office - a figure 13 times more than it cost to make. Braff says he's still shocked by the film's success.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Staff | August 4, 2005
From his rapid rise to the peak of pop with Men at Work in the '80s to his fall into the "Where are They Now" file in the '90s, Colin Hay has tasted both sides of the music industry. All the while, his music kept its honesty and tenderness -- qualities often overlooked by mainstream fans. That all changed when actor Zach Braff took notice and tacked Hay's "Beautiful World" on the Scrubs soundtrack and "I Just Don't Think I'll Ever Get Over You" on the Garden State soundtrack. Hay plays the Recher Theatre Saturday and Rams Head Tavern Sunday.
NEWS
July 31, 2005
SAMUEL M. Hecht would have understood. As the grandson and namesake of the 148-year-old retailer's founder, he might have felt a pang of family pride at the loss of the Hecht's name. But as a businessman, he would have completely understood the decision by Federated Department Stores Inc. to consolidate area stores under the Macy's logo next year. When Mr. Hecht oversaw the merger of the family-owned company with the May Department Stores Co. of St. Louis in 1959, similar decisions were made.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 20, 2004
Garden State is filled with characters you long to know more about, in situations to which almost anyone can relate. And that's as near a can't-miss movie formula as one can get. Writer-director-star Zach Braff, heretofore best known as a cast member of the TV sitcom Scrubs, has constructed a witty, literate and delicately insightful little gem of a movie about a prodigal son making tentative reconnections to his family, and in the process discovering he's...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Taylor and Jonathan Taylor,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 8, 2004
HOLLYWOOD - There is a particularly telling scene early in Garden State that captures the strange world between obscurity and celebrity to which young Hollywood hopefuls often find themselves relegated. The film's writer-director, Zach Braff, who also stars as Andrew Largeman, a doped-up struggling actor working at a Vietnamese restaurant in Los Angeles, knows the moment well - he lived it not that long ago. An actor since adolescence (he was in high school when he had a featured part in Woody Allen's 1993 Manhattan Murder Mystery)
TRAVEL
By Charles Jacobs and Charles Jacobs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 2, 2004
It took more than just its famous tomato to dub New Jersey the Garden State. Although today it is the most densely populated state in the Union, New Jersey has never forsaken its love affair with nature that marked the region's bucolic beginnings. Every year, visitors from in-state and beyond discover that secret as the state's gardens burst into bloom. Tucked away from the hubbub of its cities and the Turnpike are 125 public gardens and arboretums offering getaways to please every member of the family.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Taylor and Jonathan Taylor,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 8, 2004
HOLLYWOOD - There is a particularly telling scene early in Garden State that captures the strange world between obscurity and celebrity to which young Hollywood hopefuls often find themselves relegated. The film's writer-director, Zach Braff, who also stars as Andrew Largeman, a doped-up struggling actor working at a Vietnamese restaurant in Los Angeles, knows the moment well - he lived it not that long ago. An actor since adolescence (he was in high school when he had a featured part in Woody Allen's 1993 Manhattan Murder Mystery)
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Evening Sun Staff | October 16, 1990
Quick. What jockey has the best winning percentage in the country?Pat Day. OK, that wasn't so tough.But you might be surprised to know if you had said Rick Wilson, you would have been close.You also might be surprised to know that Wilson, almost a legend in New Jersey, is barely among the top 10 riders at Laurel. His 11 wins in 71 starts place him in seventh place, far behind leaders Edgar Prado and Mike Luzzi.But until Wilson, 37, switched his tack to Maryland about a month ago, he compiled a 25.3 winning percentage through August to rank second behind Day of all the nation's riders.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2003
In The Region Jobless pay hearings set in Hagerstown for tanning workers Hearings to sort out unemployment claims for Garden State Tanning Inc. workers laid off before, during and after a nine-day strike in the spring are tentatively scheduled for July 30 in Hagerstown. The Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Workers has hired Hagerstown lawyer William Proctor to help members get unemployment checks. Officials of the automotive leather manufacturer have said they are not fighting the unemployment claims and will abide by the decision of the state.
NEWS
By Justo Bautista and Justo Bautista,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 11, 2002
HACKENSACK, N.J. - They awake each day at dawn, rising from wooden benches, emerging from behind bushes, crawling out of alleyways and stairwells like creatures in a bad horror movie. But this is no cheap science-fiction thriller. The shadowy figures are homeless veterans stirring from the "spots" they call home. Though their nicknames - "Mountain Man," "Spinner," "The Colonel" - suggest men of independence and derring-do, the reality is anything but romantic. Stashing their meager belongings in blankets, gym bags, or underneath scraps of cardboard, they move out in all manner of dress: wrinkled windbreakers, worn-out baseball caps, dirty dungarees and sneakers.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.