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By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,special to the sun | August 17, 2003
When John Danzer was an adolescent, he was known as the "yard boy of Roland Park." The founder of Adam and Eve lawn service, he cut most of his neighbors' lawns and, by all accounts, was quite good at his job. In fact, he prospered sufficiently to buy himself a red BMW before he was old enough to have a driver's license. One can mow only so many yards, though, before one begins to notice what's placed in or on the grass. "My mother was a big gardener, and grew everything from snapdragons to peonies.
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NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,special to the sun | August 17, 2003
When John Danzer was an adolescent, he was known as the "yard boy of Roland Park." The founder of Adam and Eve lawn service, he cut most of his neighbors' lawns and, by all accounts, was quite good at his job. In fact, he prospered sufficiently to buy himself a red BMW before he was old enough to have a driver's license. One can mow only so many yards, though, before one begins to notice what's placed in or on the grass. "My mother was a big gardener, and grew everything from snapdragons to peonies.
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FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff Writer | July 30, 1995
The settee is classical in form, based on early 19th-century Federal design with a pleasing delicacy of line. It has cane seating, and the wood is painted black with gold stenciling on the back and apron.And it's sitting in an Annapolis backyard.But, look a little closer. That isn't wood, it's steel. That's not caning, it's metal screening. The finish is industrial urethane.Called the Baltimore Seat, the piece belongs in your rose garden, not your hall.With the trend toward eco-decorating, we've gotten used to outdoor furniture moving indoors.
FEATURES
By Marty Ross and Marty Ross,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | September 28, 1997
Blake Warner is an artist with an eye for twigs and branches. Warner makes rustic garden ornaments and furniture for a growing number of enthusiastic clients in the Seattle area. He's one of a great many artisans across the continent contributing to the strong revival of "nature's twisted treasures."Since at least the 17th century, people have been putting together tables, benches, gates and gazebos using branches and lots of imagination.It's not just an American craft. In the late 18th century, well-to-do Europeans began to replace the classical temples and sculptures in their gardens with rustic bridges and other structures made of materials found in woods and copses.
FEATURES
By Marty Ross and Marty Ross,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | September 28, 1997
Blake Warner is an artist with an eye for twigs and branches. Warner makes rustic garden ornaments and furniture for a growing number of enthusiastic clients in the Seattle area. He's one of a great many artisans across the continent contributing to the strong revival of "nature's twisted treasures."Since at least the 17th century, people have been putting together tables, benches, gates and gazebos using branches and lots of imagination.It's not just an American craft. In the late 18th century, well-to-do Europeans began to replace the classical temples and sculptures in their gardens with rustic bridges and other structures made of materials found in woods and copses.
FEATURES
May 5, 1996
Antiques and fabrics get togetherIt's an interesting partnership. Fitzgerald's (15 E. Chesapeake Ave.), an antiques shop that opened recently in Towson, and the nearby Calico Corners (305 York Road), a store that specializes in fabrics for the home, have begun exhibiting their wares in each other's stores.Fitzgerald's might, for instance, display swatches of beautiful indoor/outdoor fabrics with its garden furniture. Calico Corners enhances its High Country tea-stained fabrics with an antique country armoire.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | January 27, 1992
Rosemary Schorr perched on a wrought-iron settee at an Annapolis antique show yesterday, chatting about garden furniture while a cold wind blew snow through the streets outside.The winter weather hadn'taffected customers' interest in her white Victorian love seats, intricately carved urns and delicate plants stands -- any more than the poor economy had dented her business, said Schorr, one of 35 dealers exhibiting at the 22nd Annual Annapolis Heritage Antiques Show."With a poor economy, you have to be a little smarter, you have to work a little harder, but if you're willing to do that, there's no reason you can't be successful selling antiques," she said.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1997
Some people liken collecting to addiction, claiming to be in the grip of a horrible craving when they snap up early 20th-century tin signs, Japanese netsuke or Walt Disney figurines.Not Barbara Milo Ohrbach. For this author and antiques authority, collecting is a higher calling: "To keep searching, to keep finding, is a wonderful way to live."Ohrbach, who will be speaking Friday morning at this year's Hunt Valley Antiques Show, will talk about ideas for collecting, and "why we collect.""All of us have things we collect," she says.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | April 7, 1991
This spring Maria Price looked at the wreaths she was making and decided to experiment.They were big, beautiful circles made from a whole rainbow of colors in dried flowers and herbs -- just the thing for rooms full of rocking chairs and flowered chintzes, polished antiques and ruffled curtains. But that was the problem, she thought."Not everyone has a Colonial or country decor," she says. "People with a contemporary design or even a southwestern look would like something different from what most wreaths are made to look like."
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | March 9, 1997
WHILE I WAS away enjoying the balmy Florida weather, I understand you were also treated to springlike weather, much to the delight of those involved with the 27th annual Hunt Valley Antiques Show. The warm temps gave antiques buffs even more reason to get out of the house and enjoy "Garden Style Antiques," the theme of this year's show.More than 350 people attended the gala preview party at Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn, where they browsed through the exhibits while a trio played background music, and food and drinks were served.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | March 9, 1997
WHILE I WAS away enjoying the balmy Florida weather, I understand you were also treated to springlike weather, much to the delight of those involved with the 27th annual Hunt Valley Antiques Show. The warm temps gave antiques buffs even more reason to get out of the house and enjoy "Garden Style Antiques," the theme of this year's show.More than 350 people attended the gala preview party at Marriott's Hunt Valley Inn, where they browsed through the exhibits while a trio played background music, and food and drinks were served.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | February 16, 1997
Some people liken collecting to addiction, claiming to be in the grip of a horrible craving when they snap up early 20th-century tin signs, Japanese netsuke or Walt Disney figurines.Not Barbara Milo Ohrbach. For this author and antiques authority, collecting is a higher calling: "To keep searching, to keep finding, is a wonderful way to live."Ohrbach, who will be speaking Friday morning at this year's Hunt Valley Antiques Show, will talk about ideas for collecting, and "why we collect.""All of us have things we collect," she says.
FEATURES
May 5, 1996
Antiques and fabrics get togetherIt's an interesting partnership. Fitzgerald's (15 E. Chesapeake Ave.), an antiques shop that opened recently in Towson, and the nearby Calico Corners (305 York Road), a store that specializes in fabrics for the home, have begun exhibiting their wares in each other's stores.Fitzgerald's might, for instance, display swatches of beautiful indoor/outdoor fabrics with its garden furniture. Calico Corners enhances its High Country tea-stained fabrics with an antique country armoire.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff Writer | July 30, 1995
The settee is classical in form, based on early 19th-century Federal design with a pleasing delicacy of line. It has cane seating, and the wood is painted black with gold stenciling on the back and apron.And it's sitting in an Annapolis backyard.But, look a little closer. That isn't wood, it's steel. That's not caning, it's metal screening. The finish is industrial urethane.Called the Baltimore Seat, the piece belongs in your rose garden, not your hall.With the trend toward eco-decorating, we've gotten used to outdoor furniture moving indoors.
NEWS
By Angela Gambill and Angela Gambill,Staff writer | January 27, 1992
Rosemary Schorr perched on a wrought-iron settee at an Annapolis antique show yesterday, chatting about garden furniture while a cold wind blew snow through the streets outside.The winter weather hadn'taffected customers' interest in her white Victorian love seats, intricately carved urns and delicate plants stands -- any more than the poor economy had dented her business, said Schorr, one of 35 dealers exhibiting at the 22nd Annual Annapolis Heritage Antiques Show."With a poor economy, you have to be a little smarter, you have to work a little harder, but if you're willing to do that, there's no reason you can't be successful selling antiques," she said.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | April 7, 1991
This spring Maria Price looked at the wreaths she was making and decided to experiment.They were big, beautiful circles made from a whole rainbow of colors in dried flowers and herbs -- just the thing for rooms full of rocking chairs and flowered chintzes, polished antiques and ruffled curtains. But that was the problem, she thought."Not everyone has a Colonial or country decor," she says. "People with a contemporary design or even a southwestern look would like something different from what most wreaths are made to look like."
FEATURES
By LINDA LOWE MORRIS | February 2, 1992
For the past six years the owners of fancy home furnishings shops from all over the world have journeyed to Washington to shop at the Heritage Market of American Crafts. Then last year Operation Desert Storm started just before the show, and many buyers stayed away."Everyone was hesitant to come into Washington, afraid they were going to be bombed," says show organizer Barbara Pitt. "The hotel had a fire drill, and I never saw a room clear out so fast in my life."This year, as compensation for the 150 craftspeople exhibiting, Ms. Pitt decided to open the show -- formerly to the trade only -- to the public on February 9 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. to give the craftspeople a chance to sell their show samples.
FEATURES
By Lit Solis-Cohen and Sally Solis-Cohen | May 2, 1993
Organizers of the Baltimore Museum Antiques Show, May 7-9 at the Baltimore Museum of Art, hope to attract more young collectors than ever. "Several dealers with affordable merchandise will be showing for the first time," said show co-manager Pamela B. Meier. "Young collectors are looking for a variety of things. They want to make a design statement with their acquisitions, whether it's a collection of tea strainers or hyacinth vases, an apothecary chest or a piece of garden furniture," she observed.
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