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NEWS
May 30, 2014
The focus will be something old, something new on Sunday, June 1, when the Horticultural Society of Maryland hosts its 23rd annual Garden Tour, “From Manor to Modern:  Garden Design in Columbia and Ellicott City.” The tour, which runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., rain or shine, focuses on one of Howard County's oldest communities, Ellicott City, and one of its more modern and ever-changing, Columbia. This year's walking and driving tour will take visitors to seven private gardens that range from a tranquil arboretum surrounding an 18th century country estate to innovative contemporary gardens tucked away in suburbia.
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NEWS
March 15, 1992
This Kurt Bluemel-designed landscape is the winner of a National Distinction Award from the Associated Landscape Contractors of America and is featured on the National Garden Tour, 1992. What appears to be a lovely, naturalistic reflecting pond and swimming pool surrounded by bucolic gardens is foremost a serious lap pool. The sensuous, curving shape of the 840-square-foot pool, built by B&J Pool Contractors Inc., disguises its true purpose: to provide its owners with a straight 40-foot lap, with room for a return flip at the end.The pool and garden's design presented a few challenges to the builders and Mr. Bluemel.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | January 17, 1993
A steamy bit of South America is flourishing in southeastern Pennsylvania with the opening of a new Cascade Garden by the Brazilian landscape designer Roberto Burle Marx at Longwood Gardens. The garden, which opened last week, features tropical plants, especially bromeliads, set amid cascading streams in a greenhouse roughly 40 by 50 feet at the western end of the 3.5-acre conservatory complex. The project was a collaboration between Mr. Burle Marx and Conrad Hamerman, a landscape architect in Philadelphia.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | January 27, 1991
It's been snowing all day, falling hard out of the sky in huge, wet flakes, and now every twig and branch, every blade of glass is coated in white, turning Towson however temporarily into a landscape of magic.But Wolfgang Oehme, wander- ing around the edges of his garden, has his mind on spring."Do you know witch hazel?" he says, as if he's talking about a person he's about to introduce you to.He continues, without waiting for an answer, "Hamamelis . . . 'Arnold Promise.' Look at these buds.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater | November 22, 2011
It's a great time to be a history buff, with the 150th anniversary of the Civil War upon us. And there are plenty of other ways to delight history lovers with unique gifts. 1. Tour the United States Naval Academy through black and white photography, from the institution's early days to recent times. The nearly 200 photos in the hardback "Historic Photos of United States Naval Academy" book come from the academy's storehouse, the Library of Congress and other archives. By author James Cheevers.
FEATURES
By Judith Bell and Judith Bell,Contributing Writer | April 25, 1993
"Quod Severis Metes" read the wrought-iron gates to Washington's Dumbarton Oaks Gardens, the Latin words arching gracefully over two gilded sheaths of symbolic wheat: "As you sow, so shall you reap."I first stumbled upon this intriguing entrance in 1977. Then a graduate student in art history at American University, I held a part-time job in Georgetown and often trekked through the neighborhoods that were on either side of the commercial bustle of Wisconsin Avenue, admiring the riches in Federal architecture.
FEATURES
By Leslie Weddell and Leslie Weddell,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | July 20, 1997
Butterflies are welcome visitors to most gardeners. Choose the right plants, add some amenities and you can encourage them to stay awhile.For best results, select a place in your yard that receives full sun for at least six hours a day and has adequate drainage. If you don't have a yard, you still can have a butterfly garden -- just think smaller and plant your garden in a window box or container.For ease of maintenance, plan a garden that is no larger than 10 by 12 feet. Butterflies may be wild, but the plants aren't: They'll need watering and weeding.
FEATURES
By BETH SMITH | June 25, 1995
To give a traditional dining room a new twist, interior designer Rhea Arnot looked down -- down to the cream-colored needlepoint rug under the double pedestal table. Her client had hired her to design a one-of-a-kind rug to replace it."My client is an artist and her home is traditional, but with a lot of contemporary touches," says Ms. Arnot, a partner in Arnot & McComas. "The dining room is really the most traditional room in the house. I wanted my design to look like it belonged in the house, but I wanted to add a real kick to the room."
NEWS
By EILS LOTOZO and EILS LOTOZO,PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER | July 9, 2006
Outside, accessories can add structure, texture, drama and wit. Think of a bench beckoning at the end of a path, a statue semi-shrouded in foliage, a fountain bubbling on a patio, a gate that suggests more green delights beyond. "Ornaments are something that can really reflect your personality in a garden," says Inta Krombolz, who has spent nearly 30 years turning her 3-acre West Chester, Pa., property into an award winner. Ancient Egyptians accented their green spaces with pools, pergolas and trees in earthenware pots.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | February 28, 1999
Mission: To preserve, display and interpret the history of the Hammond-Harwood House in Annapolis. A National Historic Landmark, the house was built in 1774 by architect William Buckland for patriot Mathias Hammond. With its ornately carved front door, formal rooms and gardens, the house is considered one of the finest examples of five-part Georgian architecture. The building and grounds -- a museum since 1926 -- are maintained by the Hammond-Harwood House Association. The collection of late 18th- and early 19th-century decorative arts displayed in the house features Maryland furniture and paintings, including portraits by the Peale family.
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