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NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | September 13, 1991
The owner of a smoldering stump dump in Baltimore County got some bad news yesterday from Howard County, which revoked the zoning exception for his garden center near Ellicott City.The county's Board of Appeal in the first action of its kind revoked the special exception held by James F. Jett, who operates Patapsco Family Gardens in a residential zone on Route 99 near McKenzie Road.The board found that Mr. Jett had violated conditions it set in 1986 and clarified last year.The violations involved screening requirements, hours of operation, failure to erect a split-rail fence along the eastern lot line, storing equipment outdoors and selling fertilizer and hand tools prohibited for retail sale by the board, the board said.
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NEWS
By SALLY BUCKLER | October 28, 1993
Who will knock at your door begging for treats this Halloween? Will the talking pumpkin near Triadelphia Lake talk this year? How will your favorite children dress up Sunday evening? High-spirited Halloween plans are in the works at nearly every house in our area.Halloween, begun as a night of horrors, has evolved into an evening of fantasy and fun. Carved jack-o'-lanterns, creative costumes and candy treats set the stage, but the kids are the stars. They don't just pretend to be a hero or Dracula or Dorothy lovingly carrying Toto.
NEWS
November 23, 2000
Metzler's Garden Center & Florist will hold an Olde Country Christmas Open House tomorrow through Sunday during store hours at 935 W. Liberty Road, Winfield. Saturday will feature entertainment by Walt Michael, artist-in-residence at Western Maryland College and folk musician, from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. He plays classic Celtic string music on hammered dulcimer, guitar and mandolin. Design specialists will be on hand during the open house to discuss decorating for the holidays. Information: 410-549-5200.
EXPLORE
August 7, 2013
I read with interest the Aug. 1 article "Dispute between neighbors, garden center widens," and was disappointed to see that it characterized the "dispute" as being between one local homeowner and River Hill Garden Center owner Steve Klein. The article failed to mention that Howard County Council members Courtney Watson, Jen Terrasa and Calvin Ball also expressed concern over the proposed development (during the July 1 County Council work session). Additionally, in a July 22 letter to the Howard County Council, the River Hill Village Board of Directors indicated that it was "appalled" by the proposed development and that it "…emphatically re-affirms the position of the 2009 River Hill Village Board that opposed rezoning of this property from residential (R-20)
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff Writer | November 30, 1992
Christmas has come early to a fire-damaged Clarksvill church, with the help of a new garden center up the street.The River Hill Garden Center, which opened in April, has agreed to donate some of its profits on Christmas tree sales to the Linden-Linthicum United Methodist Church.The proceeds will help the church replace items, such as choir robes, that were not covered by insurance, and build its fund for charitable causes.An Oct. 17 fire in the church's sanctuary caused about $200,000 damage and forced the cancellation of the church's largest annual fund raiser, which generates about $8,000 for church needs and outreach projects.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff Writer | December 24, 1994
The morning after he had conducted a well-attended auction, a 53-year-old Perry Hall businessman was killed by a blow to the head, Baltimore County police said.The body of Paul Robert Zinkhan was discovered shortly after 9 a.m. yesterday by one of his employees at the A to Z Garden Center at 9717 Belair Road. The victim owned the business and lived on the premises in a trailer.Capt. Rustin E. Price, commander of the county homicide unit, said Mr. Zinkhan's body was found on the ground near a side door of the building from which he sold plants and fresh produce in the summer and Christmas trees during the holiday season.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | December 19, 2003
Grandfather's Garden Center has been sitting at Route 108 and Phelps Luck Drive in Long Reach for 18 years and has long been considered an eyesore by some local residents. And now that the land on which it sits could be developed, they fear what could rise in its place. For years, the garden center property has been governed by covenants that restricted it to agricultural use and allowed for only one residence. But those restrictions could be lifted, making residential development possible.
NEWS
By Michael Weishan and Michael Weishan,NEW YORK TIMES SYNDICATE | September 17, 2000
September's gentle light has a way of illuminating flaws in your landscape. Yes, early autumn offers an abundance of fruits and vegetables to harvest, and many flowers keep going strong until frost, but somehow the eye is drawn to the barren space where the hollyhocks never emerged; lawn furniture, looking used and worn; that climbing rose, begging for a new trellis. It's time to embark on what I like to call the Great Fall Scavenger Hunt. Most people obsess over their gardens in the spring, and folks at garden centers and nurseries know it. They stock up on loads of plants, tools, fertilizers and other irresistible items, well aware that we, still partially dazed with winter delirium, will obediently march out and buy tons of merchandise at premium prices.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | September 21, 1994
Long-troubled by the belief that the grass is greener on the other side of the hill, I recently have begun believing that the tomatoes are redder in other people's gardens.Here in late September, the prime bragging time of the grow-your-own tomato season, my plants have faded. Like a cheap horse that has run too fast early in the race, my tomato plants have folded up in the stretch.My diminished tomato state is especially hard to cope with since earlier in the growing season, tomatoes were rolling out of my garden and I was enjoying juicy times.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN COLUMNIST | February 3, 2002
Soon after Susan Iglehart discovered sunshine, she discovered flowers. In a rush to fill up the sun-drenched garden in her new Connecticut home, she chose annuals over perennials. Frustrated by the search for the colors she saw in her imagination, she decided to grow her own. Infused with a mother's abhorrence of waste, she planted every seed that came in every pack. And blessed with a generosity of spirit, she shared the extra plants with friends. A little more than a decade later, Susan Iglehart's flowers have grown into Susan Iglehart's Flowers, a kitchen-counter business thriving on word-of-mouth.
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