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By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Fe Reyes-Dollete and Roldolfo Dollete's patio container garden grew out of desperation. For 30 years the couple, who are both physicians, tried to grow flowers and vegetables on their suburban property, only to watch deer consume all they grew. Reyes-Dollete recalls one year she managed to grow a particularly beautiful daylily. She went to get her camera to take a picture of it, and when she returned it was gone, eaten by a deer she saw standing in the yard. The couple decided to move their garden to their patio.
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By Susan Reimer and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The challenge was to design a garden that evoked the familiar phrase “Color my world.” It sounds simple - gardens are nothing if not colorful. Carroll Landscaping owner Robert Jones and his designer, Beth Burnham, of Baltimore County chose the color green. Then they turned the challenge inside out. “We like thinking a little bit outside of the box,” says Burnham with a shy smile. Their garden would not be green as in “shades of.” It would be green as in recycled, reclaimed and repurposed - a sustainable garden.
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By John Dorsey | October 30, 1997
Las Posas is a Mexican sculpture garden created between 1954 and 1984 by eccentric British collector, poet and architect Edward James. The garden is an 80-acre site filled with surrealistic concrete sculptures of architectural elements including stairs, bridges, archways and columns. Photographer Joan Rosenstein has used the garden as a setting for her photographs of the female form. The exhibit, "The Surreal World of Las Posas," at Montgomery College combines Rosenstein's black and white photographs of women in the garden with her color photographs of the garden.
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By Kathy Hudson and For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
When it comes to landscape architects' own gardens, some are like shoemakers' shoes -- untended. Their owners are too busy making other spaces beautiful. Not so with Catherine Mahan, founding partner of Mahan Rykiel; Stuart Ortel, principal and founder of Stone Hill Design; and Carol Macht, principal and founding partner of Hord Coplan Macht. These well-respected Baltimore landscape architects have created gorgeous home gardens. Each is an extension of the house and in keeping with its architecture.
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By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
As she enters her 80s, Margaret Himes looks to her garden for solace. She started the expansive garden behind her house in the fall of 1967, just a few months after she, her husband and their three children moved into the new home in Joppatowne. Himes and her then-2-year-old daughter, Patty, planted tulips in the backyard that first autumn. When they came up the next spring, Patty asked if they could plant flowers every year. Patty, who suffered from a congenital heart ailment, died later that year, but Himes continued to work in the garden.
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By Susan Reimer On Gardening | January 21, 2010
T he number of home gardeners jumped by almost 40 percent last season, but nearly half of them won't be back this year. Most probably found vegetable gardening too much work. Or, because it was a pretty poor gardening season, they didn't have much success. So, in a series of columns, I'm trying to get rookie vegetable gardeners off to a solid start. Last week, we talked about siting the garden, and my advice was to consider constructing a raised bed and filling it with bags of compost.
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By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2010
Question: My computer savvy grandson wants to start growing vegetables and other things. I love your phone service, but can UMD's Extension service help him through his computer? Answer: Live Chat is only our latest offering. At www.hgic.umd.edu, we field email questions in our popular "Send A Question" feature. Also through "Send A Question," he can send us digital photos of weeds, insects, diseases or any other unidentified pest or plant he encounters. Videos demonstrate gardening techniques and what invasive plants he’ll want to watch out for. There are a slew of short publications on topics from fruits and flowers to soil and wildlife he can read at his leisure.
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By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
Miguel De La Cuadra calls his Charles Village garden a work in progress, yet its profusion of color gives the impression of a long-completed work of art. Just three years in the making, the rowhouse garden features raised beds overflowing with lilies, hosta, astilbe and roses. A Japanese maple drapes gracefully over a koi pond. Potted impatiens, petunias and geraniums brighten a privacy fence. De La Cuadra, a human resources generalist, says he aspired to create a garden that blooms with color from spring to fall.
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By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2012
Gardening held little appeal to Stacey Watkins, a Baltimore special-education teacher, until an organization that helps keep her classroom in books put out a call for help with an urban planting project. She soon found her manicured hands could do wonders with dirt. Within a few hours last week, Watkins, who dug unencumbered by garden gloves, had planted straight rows of broccoli, kale, cauliflower and all manner of herbs in a vacant, long-neglected lot along Park Heights Avenue.
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By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | December 8, 2011
I've been thinking about the presents I'll be giving - and getting, I hope - during the holiday season. I have inexpensive expectations, so folks needn't worry about spending a fortune on me. But if they did have fortunes to spend, I think I'd like to receive an immense rose garden, one as extravagant as Josephine's rose garden was at the Chateau Malmaison. When Empress Josephine and Emperor Napoleon ruled France during the early 1800s, Josephine lived at the Malmaison, a three-story chateau situated upon 4,500 acres on the outskirts of Paris.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
If a hotly debated Federal Hill beer garden were to open in time for Oktoberfest, it would have to do so without the beer. By a 2-1 vote Thursday, Baltimore's liquor board declared invalid a liquor license for Crossbar Der Biergarten, saying it expired in 2009 and the owners would not get a "hardship extension. " "The sale of liquor is a privilege, not a right," said board chairman Thomas Ward, who called past extensions of the proposed bar's license "illegal" decisions that the current board had a "duty to correct.
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By Janene Holzberg and For The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Maintaining an environmentally friendly landscape at her family's home in Long Reach comes as second nature to Janine Pollack, who loves gardening and the outdoors. The pluses, some obvious and some not, are numerous. They include the inherent adaptability of native plants to the area's climate as well as their ability to attract insects, which attract birds, which attract wildlife. But the primary ecological benefit - which goes undetected by most visitors surveying the natural beauty of Pollack's outdoor canvas - is the ability of strategically placed landscaping to prevent polluted stormwater runoff from spoiling waterways and eventually fouling the Chesapeake Bay. Such benefits, and the principles behind them, will explained to visitors Sept.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Fall isn't just for mums anymore. Those round mounds of yellow, rust or purple are a poor way to celebrate the luxurious Mid-Atlantic fall - and ease a gardener's itch to plant something. Now is the time to refresh decorative garden pots with a rich variety of color and hardiness that can carry their beauty beyond the first frost. "Fall is a missed opportunity," said Kerry Michaels, who writes about container gardening at about.com. "The plants are on sale; it lasts so much longer than a flower arrangement.
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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
Fishing with my nephew made me wonder - would bait worms be good to add to my garden? No! We think of earthworms as good, but some species can be very destructive. The latest non-native worm to establish itself in several states is the crazy snakeworm. Fortunately, it's not in Maryland - we don't want that nightmare here. The crazy snakeworm voraciously consumes the upper organic soil layer or mulch and turns it into grainy, dry worm-casting piles. Forest understory life is destroyed and other earthworm species disappear.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre is capping its season with "Monty Python's Spamalot" an irreverent retelling of the quest for the Holy Grail. The silliness of "Spamalot" is totally at home in Summer Garden's outdoor theater, where a lively cast delivers a production of zesty dancing guys and girls, lusty choruses and zany comedians. The 2005 musical, with book and lyrics by Eric Idle, who also composed the music with John Du Prez, is based on the 1975 movie "Monty Python and the Holy Grail.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
On Thursday,  Vivo Italian Kitchen & Wine Bar in Hanover will debut a biweekly series of Italian movie nights. Each movie night will feature a four-course prix-fixe menu inspired by that night's film.  For the series opener, "The Godfather," Vivo's Sicilian-inspired menu includes the Five Family Salad; meatballs and grilled sausages in a five-hour red sauce, like the one Clemenza taught Michael Corleone how to make; and for dessert, cannoli,...
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
An Ellicott City firehouse will be home to a train garden geared toward providing holiday gifts for needy children now through Jan. 1. The Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services is holding the free open house for the 15th year, fire officials said. Visitors may bring money and new, unwrapped toys that will go to needy children in the county. The train garden is at Ellicott City Fire Station No. 2, 4150 Montgomery Road. It is open from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Wednesdays through Fridays, 11 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. on weekends, and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Christmas Eve. The train garden is closed Mondays, Tuesdays and Christmas Day. Group tours can be arranged by calling 410-313-2036.
NEWS
June 6, 2014
Revisiting gardens is one of spring's great pleasures. After a brutal winter, every garden seems like a miracle. Recent rains, combined with some very warm days, have made for prodigious growth. Intermittent cool days have held the beauty long enough for one round of blooming plants to be enjoyed before the next breaks open. Every morning, I rush to see my garden. Revisiting it brings daily surprise. Peonies are popping open now like can-can dancers. Three new rose bushes, planted last September, are budding, and one is showing its pink color.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 27, 2014
I was prepping the garden for my daughter's engagement party when it hit me. (We really like the guy, thanks for asking.) I was inviting these strangers into the garden, but I was about to kick all the residents out. The bugs, I mean. I was all set to open up a pair of industrial-size foggers containing insect repellent and blast to death everything that flew or crawled. And all for the comfort of my human guests. But I couldn't do it. I couldn't pull the trigger. Let everybody scratch, I decided.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
As she enters her 80s, Margaret Himes looks to her garden for solace. She started the expansive garden behind her house in the fall of 1967, just a few months after she, her husband and their three children moved into the new home in Joppatowne. Himes and her then-2-year-old daughter, Patty, planted tulips in the backyard that first autumn. When they came up the next spring, Patty asked if they could plant flowers every year. Patty, who suffered from a congenital heart ailment, died later that year, but Himes continued to work in the garden.
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