Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGarbage Collection
IN THE NEWS

Garbage Collection

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 1994
Annapolis residents will pay on average $17 more each year in annual property taxes, $12 more for garbage collection and twice as much to use downtown parking meters starting July 1.But, according to the budget passed Monday night, they will get fireworks on the Fourth of July, keep twice-a-week garbage collection and Sunday bus service.The budget was a compromise between those who wanted to cut government and those who wanted to maintain programs.In the end, the council approved a $37.8 million spending plan -- about $168,000 less than the current budget.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 28, 2005
There have been two bribery-in-Baghdad scandals. The bigger one, unfolding under the noses of American occupiers and touching on everything from garbage collection to weapons procurement, is still going on. The smaller one, which took place under the auspices of the United Nations between 2000 and 2002, is finished and has been thoroughly investigated. The latest report by U.N. investigators came out yesterday, and it's hard not to feel a certain grudging sense of admiration for the way Saddam Hussein and his henchmen managed to get buyers and sellers to fork over baksheesh.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | June 13, 1994
A divided and contentious Annapolis City Council will resume discussion tonight of a 1995 operating budget.Alderman Wayne Turner, a Ward 5 Republican, is expected to suggest that the council discard the recommendations of its finance committee and take up the budget proposal of Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins.The mayor's $37.8 million spending plan would reduce garbage collection from twice a week to once a week, eliminate the jobs of 13 public works employees and cut Sunday bus service and routes into the county.
NEWS
August 8, 2000
WHEN HOWARD and Baltimore county residents gained curbside recycling, they gave up one of their two trash-collection days. Sure, some people grumbled, but many saw it as an even swap. Anne Arundel County should have done the same when it began curbside recycling in 1991. But it didn't. Local governments started curbside recycling, after all, to discourage citizens from carelessly discarding reusable materials such as plastic, aluminum, cereal boxes and newspapers. Here, the message wasn't clear.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | June 21, 1994
The Annapolis City Council last night adopted a $38 million operating budget for fiscal 1995, although the document was amended so many times that officials late last night had yet to calculate the ultimate cost to taxpayers.The aldermen made more than 35 changes to the budget proposed by the City Council Finance Committee. As a result, finance officials were left scrambling to calculate the exact amount of the budget and the property tax rate for the fiscal year that begins July 1."In my 28 years on the council, and in 28 budgets, I've never seen this many amendments," said Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins.
NEWS
December 30, 1996
IT HAS BEEN six months since Howard County put a four-can limit on the number of trash cans a family can put out for pick-up and imposed an annual $125-per-household garbage collection tax. All signs so far indicate the new arrangement has been a success. But its unfair nature, charging everyone the same no matter how much trash is put out, means improvements must be made.County Executive Charles I. Ecker is still wedded to his idea to eventually move to a system in which people pay by the pound to have their trash picked up by the county.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | June 6, 1994
After a month of meetings and discussion, the Annapolis City Council's Finance Committee has devised a 1995 budget that would restore twice-a-week garbage collection and Sunday bus service.A public hearing on the proposed budget will be held at 6 tonight.Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins' $37.8 million budget, proposed last month, would reduce trash collection and eliminate 13 public works employees. The mayor's plan also would cut Sunday bus service, increase parking meter fees and fines and raise the property tax rate by 7 cents.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | June 14, 1994
After accusations of paranoia and underhandedness, members of the Annapolis City Council promised last night to work together this week to pass the city's 1995 operating budget.Despite earlier confusion over whether the council would vote Monday on the mayor's budget proposal or the plan submitted by the finance committee, the council passed on first reader last night the budget submitted by the finance committee.The $38.5 million plan calls for the restoration of twice-weekly garbage collection, Sunday bus service and the jobs of 13 public works employees that the mayor had proposed cutting.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | May 25, 1994
Taxpayers can voice their thoughts on proposed increases in the fees charged for collecting garbage and for water and sewer service tonight at a public hearing in Annapolis.Anne Arundel County Executive Robert R. Neall is proposing a 3.5 percent increase in the utility rate, which means the average water and sewer user will pay $14.24 more each year, about $1.18 a month.The increase will pay for the higher cost of operations, county officials said in budget documents.The 1995 fiscal year budget for the utility operating fund will increase to $58.4 million, an increase of 11.4 percent or $5.9 million.
NEWS
October 28, 2005
There have been two bribery-in-Baghdad scandals. The bigger one, unfolding under the noses of American occupiers and touching on everything from garbage collection to weapons procurement, is still going on. The smaller one, which took place under the auspices of the United Nations between 2000 and 2002, is finished and has been thoroughly investigated. The latest report by U.N. investigators came out yesterday, and it's hard not to feel a certain grudging sense of admiration for the way Saddam Hussein and his henchmen managed to get buyers and sellers to fork over baksheesh.
NEWS
December 30, 1996
IT HAS BEEN six months since Howard County put a four-can limit on the number of trash cans a family can put out for pick-up and imposed an annual $125-per-household garbage collection tax. All signs so far indicate the new arrangement has been a success. But its unfair nature, charging everyone the same no matter how much trash is put out, means improvements must be made.County Executive Charles I. Ecker is still wedded to his idea to eventually move to a system in which people pay by the pound to have their trash picked up by the county.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | June 22, 1994
Annapolis residents will pay on average $17 more each year in annual property taxes, $12 more for garbage collection and twice as much to use downtown parking meters starting July 1.But, according to the budget passed Monday night, they will get fireworks on the Fourth of July, keep twice-a-week garbage collection and Sunday bus service.The budget was a compromise between those who wanted to cut government and those who wanted to maintain programs.In the end, the council approved a $37.8 million spending plan -- about $168,000 less than the current budget.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | June 21, 1994
The Annapolis City Council last night adopted a $38 million operating budget for fiscal 1995, although the document was amended so many times that officials late last night had yet to calculate the ultimate cost to taxpayers.The aldermen made more than 35 changes to the budget proposed by the City Council Finance Committee. As a result, finance officials were left scrambling to calculate the exact amount of the budget and the property tax rate for the fiscal year that begins July 1."In my 28 years on the council, and in 28 budgets, I've never seen this many amendments," said Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | June 14, 1994
After accusations of paranoia and underhandedness, members of the Annapolis City Council promised last night to work together this week to pass the city's 1995 operating budget.Despite earlier confusion over whether the council would vote Monday on the mayor's budget proposal or the plan submitted by the finance committee, the council passed on first reader last night the budget submitted by the finance committee.The $38.5 million plan calls for the restoration of twice-weekly garbage collection, Sunday bus service and the jobs of 13 public works employees that the mayor had proposed cutting.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | June 13, 1994
A divided and contentious Annapolis City Council will resume discussion tonight of a 1995 operating budget.Alderman Wayne Turner, a Ward 5 Republican, is expected to suggest that the council discard the recommendations of its finance committee and take up the budget proposal of Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins.The mayor's $37.8 million spending plan would reduce garbage collection from twice a week to once a week, eliminate the jobs of 13 public works employees and cut Sunday bus service and routes into the county.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1994
Deliberations on the 1995 Annapolis operating budget are in disarray after the resignation of the City Council's finance committee chairwoman and word that the majority of council apparently wants to go back to the budget the mayor proposed more than a month ago.As a result of the confusion, no one is certain which of two budget plans will be discussed when a public hearing resumes on Monday."
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1994
Deliberations on the 1995 Annapolis operating budget are in disarray after the resignation of the City Council's finance committee chairwoman and word that the majority of council apparently wants to go back to the budget the mayor proposed more than a month ago.As a result of the confusion, no one is certain which of two budget plans will be discussed when a public hearing resumes on Monday."
NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff writer | May 7, 1992
Faced with an unbalanced budget, county school board members transferred money yesterday that had been earmarked for instructional materials to pay for garbage collection and utility bills."
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | June 6, 1994
After a month of meetings and discussion, the Annapolis City Council's Finance Committee has devised a 1995 budget that would restore twice-a-week garbage collection and Sunday bus service.A public hearing on the proposed budget will be held at 6 tonight.Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins' $37.8 million budget, proposed last month, would reduce trash collection and eliminate 13 public works employees. The mayor's plan also would cut Sunday bus service, increase parking meter fees and fines and raise the property tax rate by 7 cents.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | May 25, 1994
Taxpayers can voice their thoughts on proposed increases in the fees charged for collecting garbage and for water and sewer service tonight at a public hearing in Annapolis.Anne Arundel County Executive Robert R. Neall is proposing a 3.5 percent increase in the utility rate, which means the average water and sewer user will pay $14.24 more each year, about $1.18 a month.The increase will pay for the higher cost of operations, county officials said in budget documents.The 1995 fiscal year budget for the utility operating fund will increase to $58.4 million, an increase of 11.4 percent or $5.9 million.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.