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NEWS
By Patrick J. Michaels | August 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - On July 25, at a hearing of the House Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee (the same folks who grill corporate executives), the nation found out how little real science there is about global warming. The hearing was prompted by the discovery that federal scientists were using computer models that they knew could not replicate U.S. temperatures. They appeared in two landmark documents that have served as the basis for very expensive and intrusive energy legislation. What came out of the hearing has people asking whether the same problems affecting Enron, WorldCom, Global Crossing, etc., are now troubling environmental science.
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The challenge was to design a garden that evoked the familiar phrase “Color my world.” It sounds simple - gardens are nothing if not colorful. Carroll Landscaping owner Robert Jones and his designer, Beth Burnham, of Baltimore County chose the color green. Then they turned the challenge inside out. “We like thinking a little bit outside of the box,” says Burnham with a shy smile. Their garden would not be green as in “shades of.” It would be green as in recycled, reclaimed and repurposed - a sustainable garden.
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NEWS
By SUSAN TRAUSCH | July 28, 1992
Boston -- Dennis Reed makes me want to cheer and sigh in the same breath. He's the principal in Tampa, Florida, who's been hitting the papers with his crusade to clean up the language of his students. He put every obscenity coming from the mouths of babes at Dickenson Elementary on a poster and took it around to parents for X-rated show and tell.Go Dennis! But oh, how I wish you weren't news. There was a time, not too long ago, when you could have put that energy into the curriculum.Something else deepens my sigh as I talk on the phone with this 57-year-old gentleman who sounds like a Southern Mr. Chips: guilt.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
With debris from last week's deluge still littering the Inner Harbor, a big new weapon is poised to take on the rafts of floating trash that routinely gross out Baltimore's waterfront visitors and residents alike. A "water wheel" designed to scoop up 50,000 pounds of flotsam every day debuts Thursday in the channel between Piers 5 and 6, where the Jones Falls empties into the Northwest Branch of the Patapsco River. Its backers hope it will make a serious dent in the torrent of garbage that's flushed into the harbor whenever it rains, besmirching the city's watery showcase.
EXPLORE
February 1, 2012
A friend of mine, who knows more about these things than I do, corrects me when the subject of global warming enters the conversation. The correct term, she reminds me, "is climate change. " The bottom line is scientists who study the weather are pretty much in agreement that the cumulative effect of decades of air pollution will be to change weather patterns over the long haul. They've come up with evidence that it's pretty much started, as several of the hottest years since records started being kept have been in the last 10 years.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2010
A storm drain blew up after filling with water from a nearby water main break on top of mounds of garbage on Montpelier Street in Waverly Wednesday, a public works spokesman said. The garbage "explosion" happened when a water main break in the 3100 block of Ellerslie Avenue caused a waterline to a house to break, sending water into storm drains, said Kurt Kocher, a DPW spokesman. When the water ran into the storm drain on Montpelier Street, the storm drain was already filled with garbage, causing the storm drain to overflow — leaving a "hole" in the street, Kocher said.
NEWS
March 8, 1993
Here's something you won't see very often: a state agency that's positively gleeful over cutting a basic service. Beginning this month, Maryland's Department of Natural Resources got rid of all the trash barrels in the day-use areas of state parks and told 7.5 million park users they have to clean up their own mess. Far from treating this as a gloom-and-doom budget cut, the DNR is heralding a grand new era of cleaner parks and environmental activism.Skeptical? So were we. No way, we thought, are people going to haul home a bag of smelly garbage after a long day at Sandy Point State Park.
NEWS
By Joni Sensel | September 26, 2001
Editor's note: A resourceful girl wages a successful battle against waste. "Jo, take out the garbage!" my mom would often shout. Pretending not to hear, I'd mutter, "It can take itself out." Our house had tons of garbage: cans and bottles, plastic bags, bones and boxes, broken toys and loads of dirty rags. I never gave the trash a thought, but make more than I should: I threw away all kinds of things that really were still good. But one night I was startled by a messy mystery -- when I was slow to take the trash, the garbage took out me!
NEWS
October 2, 1994
As curbside recycling programs spread around the region, Marylanders are learning a surprising thing about their garbage: a lot of it isn't. By separating items like cans, bottles and paper for separate pick-ups, the average family is finding that once-a-week pick-up for everything else is plenty.Meanwhile, local governments are pleasantly surprised to discover that citizen participation is one of the easier parts of recycling programs. In fact, some jurisdictions are now recycling close to half their garbage, whereas only a few years ago, no one expected recycling programs to claim more than about a quarter of a community's waste.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | October 4, 2012
Successfully dealing with waste has been a hallmark of successful governments since human settlements evolved into cities. Rome may be remembered for its debauched emperors, but it's also remembered for its aqueducts and related sewage and garbage disposal public works structure. It's a defining characteristic of humanity that we have special places where we dispose of waste. Archaeologists call the ancient waste disposal mound sites middens, and they're regarded as valuable sources of information about how ancient people lived.
NEWS
January 28, 2014
This afternoon I went to my office to write letters in support of Baltimore's bag tax, and during my half-block commute, a discarded plastic bag blew across my path. I did what I usually do: Chased it down and picked it up. It was one less bag in the belly of a dead whale ( "Bag tax economics," Jan. 22). The facts are that the U.S. consumes about 100 billion plastic bags a year out of the total of 1 trillion used worldwide. That's a million plastic bags used per minute. And only 1 percent to 3 percent of them are recycled.
NEWS
January 27, 2014
It's high time for all to get involved with recycling agendas. I live in a condominium in northeast Baltimore County where, on every street, there are dumpsters, clearly denoted for either garbage or recycling. They are strategically placed throughout the complex. And yet when I open the lid of the garbage dumpster, I see many recyclable items. Should I have to be the one who has to differentiate between garbage and recyclables and sort out those items for my neighbors? Are there still people truly that lazy, that indifferent, to the concept?
EXPLORE
By David Tayman, D.V.M | August 19, 2013
Q: Help! I often catch my dog eating trash -- or sometimes even dog excrement (his own or from other dogs). Why does he do this, and how can I stop this behavior? A: These behaviors are not uncommon. Like Oscar the Grouch, dogs love trash -- especially the smells wafting from bags, bins and containers. In your kitchen trash can, the discarded food we scrape off our dinner plates is actually fairly fresh. Dogs must be thinking we're crazy for throwing away perfectly good stuff.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2013
A CSX train carrying trash from upstate New York derailed Friday evening in Lansdowne, Baltimore County officials said. No injuries were reported, and police said the train was not carrying hazardous materials. "No injuries, no fire, no hazmat," said Cpl. Cathy Batton, a county police spokeswoman. Ten railcars left the tracks about 8 p.m., with four landing on their sides, CSX spokesman Gary Sease said. The derailment occurred on tracks that parallel Hammonds Ferry Road near Elizabeth Avenue.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS and THE RECORD | May 2, 2013
Spring cleaning has taken on a new aspect in Harford County in recent years, as volunteers take on the of picking up litter. The recent Earth Day-oriented Susquehanna River Sweep is one such event. A few weeks before that there was a cleanup along Otter Point Creek in Edgewood, which, like River Sweep, is an annual happening. This also is the time of year when, likely as not, smaller groups of volunteers will coordinate cleanup days along their adopted sections of county and state roadways.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
In the mid- to late-1990s, Scottish singer Shirley Manson and her Wisconsin-based band Garbage were alt-rock darlings, MTV rotation regulars, platinum chart-toppers and a band that had little problem selling out headlining tours. The rush of success that came with two massively popular albums - 1995's self-titled debut (featuring "Stupid Girl") and 1998's follow-up "Version 2.0" (featuring "I Think I'm Paranoid") - raised the band's profile and the expectations of Garbage's record label, Interscope.
NEWS
July 17, 1995
Is Howard County on its way to a "pay-as-you-throw" fee system of garbage disposal?County Executive Charles Ecker has asked the local Solid Waste Funding Assessment Board to recommend a disposal financing plan by Sept. 1, and it might well include a plan whereby residents would have to pay for the removal of their nonrecyclable trash that exceeds a stated limit. Under the present arrangement, the cost of disposal per Howard household comes to about $120 a year and is covered by income and property taxes.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | April 9, 1995
They're slimy, wiggly and eat garbage. Children love them, and so do gardeners. They're worms, squirmy little composters that turn table scraps into rich fertilizer.This week, kindergartner Scotty Horigan got a close look at these industrious critters -- maybe a little too close for his taste."They feel squiggly, like spit," said the Ellicott City 6-year-old, gingerly dropping a bunch of dirt-covered worms into a cut-off plastic soda bottle to make his very own home composter as part of a program sponsored by state and county agricultural officials.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts | January 25, 2013
Leslie is appalled by the lack of gender diversity in Pawnee government. She brings it up with Chris and he agrees to go along with her Equal Gender Employment Commission idea. He puts out a memo asking each department to send a representative and is genuinely dismayed when all the people sent to the meeting are men. I loved the look of wonder and contrition as he realized, "I'm part of the problem. " Particularly problematic in terms of women hires is the Sanitation Department. Leslie points this out and the department representatives spout the "Well, it's a physically demanding job, and if a woman could do it...
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2012
Can someone loan Ken Ulman a shirt he can wear to pick up another county's garbage? Don't everyone line up at once. After his bet on Sunday's Ravens game went sour, the Howard County executive has to make good on what he promised Prince George's County Executive Rushern Baker. Sometime this week Ulman must put on a Robert Lee Griffin III jersey and wear it to pick up roadside trash in  Redskins terriotory while singing the team song. "All my Redskin fan friends are coming out of the woodwork today, giving me a hard time.," Ulman said in a video he posted Monday on You Tube.
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