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Garam Masala

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By JOE GRAY and JOE GRAY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 16, 2006
Reading through cookbooks, and sometimes testing recipes, can be lots of fun. A recipe for garam masala from India with Passion, by Manju Malhi, caught my eye recently. The traditional spice blend has many variations, "depending on the region and personal taste," he writes. Make a batch and keep it in the cupboard for inspiration. In this recipe, that inspiration began with steak. I added onions, sauteed just enough to still have plenty of crunch, and some cooling yogurt and tart pineapple, and a new dish was born.
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By Donna Ellis | September 8, 2011
Most of us so-called grown-ups are just like the kids. As much as we moan about going back to school, we're pretty much over our free-form summer hours and want to get back to some sort of routine. One of the things we look forward to is seeing friends and family we've missed during the hot months due to varying vacation schedules. A dinner party is a fun way to catch up. But just because we're getting back to our routines doesn't mean our festive moments have to be the same old same old. Ergo, our culinary exercise du mois is to fix a dinner for eight that's a bit on the exotic side.
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NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | March 14, 2007
Soup from a can for dinner seems sad somehow. But sometimes, that's all that time allows. That doesn't mean you can't jazz it up with pantry items and maybe leftover ham. That's what I did recently. I pulled a can of split pea soup from the shelf, then rummaged in the refrigerator for any additions. Leftover ham, cubed, went into a skillet to saute in a little butter with chopped shallots. I sprinkled a little garam masala into the ham mixture, then added the soup. While it simmered, I decided I needed something more.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,Chicago Tribune | March 14, 2007
Soup from a can for dinner seems sad somehow. But sometimes, that's all that time allows. That doesn't mean you can't jazz it up with pantry items and maybe leftover ham. That's what I did recently. I pulled a can of split pea soup from the shelf, then rummaged in the refrigerator for any additions. Leftover ham, cubed, went into a skillet to saute in a little butter with chopped shallots. I sprinkled a little garam masala into the ham mixture, then added the soup. While it simmered, I decided I needed something more.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | January 16, 1991
My friend Jan isn't a strict vegetarian. She'll eat a good hamburger or cheese steak like the rest of us. But after work hours she reverts to her native-Californian food consciousness. The I'll-eat-almost-anything-by-day woman turns into an evening-vegan.At least four nights a week she cooks up a meatless meal so she can get her healthful supply of vegetables in the diet, cut the fat and frankly save some money. Because of this she is always hungry for some good vegetarian cookbooks or meatlessrecipes.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2005
At first glance, The World of Spice (Kyle Books, 2004, $29.95) seems almost as mysterious as its title subject. Like a display of spices, colorful and full of secret potential, the book teases with beautiful pictures, detailed food histories and exotically named recipes. But as with a tantalizing item on the spice rack, it is not quite clear at first what to do with it. When I first flipped through the index and skimmed some of the book's 200 recipes, organized by world region, few jumped out as realistic cooking projects.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | September 8, 2011
Most of us so-called grown-ups are just like the kids. As much as we moan about going back to school, we're pretty much over our free-form summer hours and want to get back to some sort of routine. One of the things we look forward to is seeing friends and family we've missed during the hot months due to varying vacation schedules. A dinner party is a fun way to catch up. But just because we're getting back to our routines doesn't mean our festive moments have to be the same old same old. Ergo, our culinary exercise du mois is to fix a dinner for eight that's a bit on the exotic side.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | May 31, 1995
What's hot and not, trendy and ancient, delicious and health-promoting all at the same time?Though Americans have been looking West and South for food trends in recent years -- Southwest, Tex-Mex, Southern home style and California-Pacific flavors have all had their day -- it's time to look East, at the food of India. It's a vast, varied and dynamic cuisine that's existed for thousands of years, but is attracting new adherents for its range of tastes and versatile preparations.Even Jean-Louis Palladin, the noted French chef of Jean-Louis at the Watergate in Washington has ventured into subcontinent cuisine, with a dinner last month in New York for the Union Ligue Club, where he shared cooking honors with an Indian chef named Raji.
FEATURES
By Ann Feild and Ann Feild,Contributing Writer | March 18, 1992
On a chilly, winter day, when the house is filled with the opulent odor of baking cardamom bread, it's easy to understand why fierce wars were once waged over spices.Cardamom lends a rich flavor to savory and dessert dishes alike -- it has charisma, if you like. It's an integral part of many Indian curries, and is very popular in Arab countries where it's used in coffee. But here in America, it's not on every cook's spice shelf.Why? Well, perhaps the cost is prohibitive. The first time I encountered cardamom at a food co-op, I thought there had been a pricing error.
FEATURES
By Bharti Kirchner and Bharti Kirchner,Eating Well magazine United Feature Syndicate | April 23, 1995
Where I grew up in eastern India, no single course had more importance than the others. In the West, the entree -- almost always a meat, poultry or fish dish -- is the meal's main attraction, and the vegetables and grains get only sideshow billing.Americans are interested in cooking meatless meals, but they are uncertain about what constitutes a vegetarian entree. A grilled vegetarian burger is a good place to start. Once you have convinced your family that a vegetarian entree can be just as satisfying as meat, they will be eager to try these other vegetable dishes.
NEWS
By JOE GRAY and JOE GRAY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 16, 2006
Reading through cookbooks, and sometimes testing recipes, can be lots of fun. A recipe for garam masala from India with Passion, by Manju Malhi, caught my eye recently. The traditional spice blend has many variations, "depending on the region and personal taste," he writes. Make a batch and keep it in the cupboard for inspiration. In this recipe, that inspiration began with steak. I added onions, sauteed just enough to still have plenty of crunch, and some cooling yogurt and tart pineapple, and a new dish was born.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2005
At first glance, The World of Spice (Kyle Books, 2004, $29.95) seems almost as mysterious as its title subject. Like a display of spices, colorful and full of secret potential, the book teases with beautiful pictures, detailed food histories and exotically named recipes. But as with a tantalizing item on the spice rack, it is not quite clear at first what to do with it. When I first flipped through the index and skimmed some of the book's 200 recipes, organized by world region, few jumped out as realistic cooking projects.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | May 31, 1995
What's hot and not, trendy and ancient, delicious and health-promoting all at the same time?Though Americans have been looking West and South for food trends in recent years -- Southwest, Tex-Mex, Southern home style and California-Pacific flavors have all had their day -- it's time to look East, at the food of India. It's a vast, varied and dynamic cuisine that's existed for thousands of years, but is attracting new adherents for its range of tastes and versatile preparations.Even Jean-Louis Palladin, the noted French chef of Jean-Louis at the Watergate in Washington has ventured into subcontinent cuisine, with a dinner last month in New York for the Union Ligue Club, where he shared cooking honors with an Indian chef named Raji.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | January 16, 1991
My friend Jan isn't a strict vegetarian. She'll eat a good hamburger or cheese steak like the rest of us. But after work hours she reverts to her native-Californian food consciousness. The I'll-eat-almost-anything-by-day woman turns into an evening-vegan.At least four nights a week she cooks up a meatless meal so she can get her healthful supply of vegetables in the diet, cut the fat and frankly save some money. Because of this she is always hungry for some good vegetarian cookbooks or meatlessrecipes.
FEATURES
By SARA ENGRAM | September 19, 2001
Kids and sushi Every culture has its favorite finger food. Tricycle Press, the children's book division of Ten Speed Press, is initiating a World Snacks series to introduce our littlest eaters to bite-sized foods from around the world. First Book of Sushi features colorful illustrations and rhyming text to inform and charm eaters big and small. A sample: "Miso in my sippy cup, tofu in my bowl. Crab and avocado fill my California roll. I'll take yellowtail hamachi and a red maguro slice.
NEWS
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 2, 2008
This recipe borrows a few ingredients popular in Indian cuisine - curry powder, yogurt and mint - for a fast route to supper. Instead of rice, we're using orzo pasta, which has a similar shape and a sublime texture. Rice can be substituted if you wish, with basmati being the best choice here. Garam masala, a blend of various spices (the mix varies but often includes cumin, coriander and cinnamon), can be used in place of the curry powder. Vegetarians could replace the meat with cubes of firm tofu; just add the chickpeas and sauce about 1 minute after the tofu hits the skillet.
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