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NEWS
February 9, 2007
French masterpieces -- Sundays At Three Chamber Music Series will present Masterpieces of French Chamber Music, performed by pianist Brian Ganz (above); violinists Ronald Mutchnik, Claudia Chudacoff and Peter Sirotin; violist Julius Wirth and cellist Fiona Thompson at 3 p.m. Sunday at Christ Episcopal Church, 5800 Oakland Mills Road, Columbia. Works by Cesar Frank, Maurice Ravel and Ernest Chausson are on the program. Tickets are $15; $10 for unaccompanied full-time students. Children and youth to age 18 are admitted free when accompanied by an adult.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2013
You might pass by 1352 Key Highway thinking it just another high-tech Inner Harbor office building. Slow down next time and take a good look at what might be one of the most unusual residences in Baltimore. The property, notable for its opaque glass exterior, is a show-stopper with five levels, four of which feature floor-to-ceiling windows. As one-half of a townhouse duplex built in 2009, the east-facing structure is constructed of stucco, metal, brick and, naturally, glass. "It shows like a model home.
NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2013
Many Marylanders live on the water, but the owner of this contemporary townhouse in Baltimore can walk out on three balconies and be over the water. The five-level home, built in 2006, sold for $1,125,000, about $100,000 less than the asking price. "This home was fun to sell because it showed so well and had excellent views of Baltimore's Inner Harbor from every level," said real estate agent William J. Ganz III, who listed the townhouse at 647 Ponte Villas South. "Combined with the fact that it is located in the private, gated Pier Homes at Harborview community, it was just a matter of time before it sold.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 7, 2000
Bowie's 2nd Star Productions has a winning season opener in Neil Simon's 1988 play, "Rumors." The cast generally succeeds at delivering rapid-fire dialogue laced with comic one-liners, and at executing the lightning-paced demands of choreographed entrances and exits. In "Rumors," America's most successful playwright uses his rapier wit to deflate the cast of self-absorbed, unlikable wealthy New Yorkers who practice law, accounting, psychiatry, state politics and culinary arts. We enjoy their discomfort at injuries to their cherished BMWs, or to their klutzy selves with whiplash, temporary deafness, burned fingers and a flushed-down-the-toilet new-age crystal.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 1, 2001
Some of Maryland's finest young musicians will come together Saturday evening when the Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra presents its Gala Spring Concert at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis. The 7 p.m. concert will be led by the orchestra's music director, David Ik-Sung Choo, who will conduct works by Tchaikovsky, Lalo and Beethoven in addition to the "Elegy" composed by Raymond Weidner, composer and choirmaster at Woods Memorial Presbyterian Church in Severna Park. Soloing in the first movement of Edouard Lalo's sultry "Symphonie Espagnole" will be violinist Robert Burnett, 17, of Bowie, winner of this season's Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra Concerto Competition.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 22, 2000
This review appeared in some editions on Saturday. The latest Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program celebrates pianos, pianists and composers who were great pianists. For good measure, it throws in a whimsical poet and a veteran of stage and screen who knows how to milk a good verse. It's quite an evening, without a dull minute in it. On Friday at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the electricity gained in intensity as the number of keyboards in use declined -- Mozart's Concerto for Three Pianos, Saint-Saens' "Carnival of the Animals" for two pianos and orchestra, Rachmaninoff's powerhouse D minor Piano Concerto.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 20, 2000
The latest Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program celebrates pianos, pianists and composers who were great pianists. For good measure, it throws in a whimsical poet and a veteran of stage and screen who knows how to milk a good verse. It's quite an evening, without a dull minute in it. Last night at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the electricity gained in intensity as the number of keyboards in use declined -- Mozart's Concerto for Three Pianos, to Saint-Saens' "Carnival of the Animals" for two pianos and orchestra, to Rachmaninoff's powerhouse D minor Piano Concerto.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | April 8, 1992
That Liszt once compared the second movement of Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 4 to the story of Orpheus taming the Furies is apparently apocryphal: There is no record of Liszt saying or writing such a thing and the story probably originates with Donald Francis Tovey's essay on the piece.But the fact that this metaphor has taken such hold in the imagination -- you cannot read a set of program notes without an account of it -- proves how apt a description it is. The piano's yielding, pleading phrases do indeed conquer the fierce, stentorian cries of the orchestra: It is Beethoven at his most operatic.
NEWS
By James Bernstein and James Bernstein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 9, 2003
Americans love change, but not in their pocket change. While other countries around the world in recent years have discarded small-denomination coins and replaced some paper money with new coins, the United States has resisted. Americans have failed to take dollar coins to their hearts or wallets, for that matter, and continue to let pennies pile up, even though it costs as much to make one coin as it's worth. Recently, even a move to tamper with the appearance of the nickel caused a minor uproar that prompted congressional action.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 2004
As a teenage violinist who served as concertmistress of the Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra, Dawn Kittrell of Annapolis was one of the most talented young musicians on the local scene. So when she graduated from Annapolis High School in 1999 and headed to St. Mary's College, the folks in Southern Maryland felt lucky to have her. And with good reason. "Dawn quickly became one of the centerpieces of our program," says Brian Ganz, the Annapolis-based concert pianist who teaches at St. Mary's and at Baltimore's Peabody Institute.
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