Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGans
IN THE NEWS

Gans

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 25, 2005
On Sunday, July 24, 2005, HELEN GANS SENKER; beloved wife of late Jerome Senker; devoted mother of Allan H. Senker of Baltimore, MD and Dr. Edward G. Senker of Stamford, Conn.; devoted sister of the late Walter J. Gans, Jr. Also survived by five loving grandchildren and eight loving great grandchildren. Funeral Services and Interment will be held at Hebrew Friendship Cemetery, 3600 E. Baltimore Street on Monday, July 25 at 11 A.M. Please omit flowers. In mourning at 3406 Garrison Farms Road (21208)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2012
Ruth B. Gans, who had worked in Annapolis as a legislative aide and later for several state agencies, died Jan. 20 of a brain tumor and pneumonia at the Bellhaven Center for Rehabilitation & Nursing Care in Brookhaven, N.Y. The Fells Point resident was 76. The daughter of a manufacturer's representative and a homemaker, Ruth Bogart was born in New York City and moved with her family in 1943 to a home on Oswego Avenue in the Park Heights neighborhood...
Advertisement
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | April 14, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Voter participation is running at a record low rate in this year's presidential primaries, with four out of five of those eligible to vote staying home, according to a new study.A total of 18.9 percent of voting-age Americans have taken part ** in primaries so far, the non-partisan Committee for the Study of the American Electorate reported yesterday. The previous record low for a primary season was 20.6 percent in 1984.Compared with 1988, turnout this year is off nearly 12 percent, the report said.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2010
At a time when a fellow Baltimorean named George Ruth was barely in knickers, Joe Gans was the biggest star in town. Along with Cardinal James Gibbons — the Cardinal Gibbons — Gans was one of the most famous people in the country. Maybe even the world. Boxing fans knew Gans, who died a century ago Tuesday, as the world's first African-American champion, but he was more than that. Those in Baltimore knew Gans as the proprietor of the city's hottest nightclub who tooled around the cobblestone streets in Henry Ford's newfangled automobile.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Evening Sun Staff | September 27, 1991
For decades, they helped shape the attitudes of the Soviet people toward Americans as journalists for the two most powerful news organizations in that nation.Their task: to write about all that was not good about the United States.Now Vitaly Gans, Washington bureau chief of Pravda, and Vladimir Mataysh, Washington bureau chief of the Soviet Union's official Tass News Agency, say they are painting a more accurate portrayal of American life as a result of perestroika and this summer's failed coup.
NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER and NICOLE FULLER,SUN REPORTER | October 27, 2005
The headstone is inscribed with just one word: Gans. It's a bit of a head-scratcher to some, how a boxing great and native son of Baltimore, Joseph Gans, known in the ring as the "Old Master," ended up with such a brief send-off. He was, after all, Baltimore's first worldwide boxing champion and the first native-born black American to win a worldwide title. His nearly 6,000-pound granite marker once stood with an air of prestige among the many cracked and overturned gravestones at Mount Auburn Cemetery, believed to be the city's oldest cemetery for African-Americans.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2002
After every decade's census, the party in power in each state redraws legislative and congressional district boundaries to account for population shifts. The idea, ordered by the U.S. Supreme Court, is to create an arithmetically pure landscape for democracy: One person, one vote. Once accomplished, the whole exercise seems arid and silly: The carefully balanced electorate doesn't show. For four decades, American voters have been too lazy or too turned off to turn out. Some say their absence is a vote against a system they don't respect or trust.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | March 27, 1995
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- Big Country fishes at Kerr Lake. That's K-E-R-R, and he doesn't care that the secret is out, now that he's off to the Final Four."
NEWS
By JULES WEITCOVER and JULES WEITCOVER,Jules Witcover writes, with Jack Germond, a national political column for The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 1992
Washington. -- Barely ten weeks since the official start of the 1992 presidential nominating process in Iowa, the preference of a large number of eligible voters for America's next leader already seems to be in: None of the Above.Poll after poll shows that a significant segment of the electorate wishes that other candidates were running in both parties. The most recent survey by the Times Mirror Center for The People and The Press, for example, found fully two-thirds of all voters polled said they were unhappy with the choices available to them.
NEWS
November 17, 2007
On November 14,2007, WARREN GANS BLOSSER of Bel Air, MD; beloved husband of Claudia B. Zealor Blosser; devoted father of Jack G. Blosser and his wife, Michelle, Kimberly Blosser Haug and her husband, Glenn and the late Warren Gans Blosser, Jr.; loving brother of Robert Blosser and the late John Blosser, Mildred Weaver, Ruth Umble and Margaret Davis. Also survived by three grandchildren, Marlayna Haug, Jenna Blosser and Warren Blosser. Services will be held at Union Chapel United Methodist Church, Joppa, MD on Monday, November 19, 2007 at 11 A.M. Interment will be in the adjoining church cemetery.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | November 21, 2007
Warren Gans Blosser, a World War II Navy gunner who participated in the assault on Iwo Jima and later worked as a railroader and insurance agent, died of congestive heart failure Nov. 14 at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The former Fallston resident was 85. Mr. Blosser was born in Smithfield, Pa., and was raised there and in Uniontown, Pa. After graduating from Smithfield High School in 1939, he worked at U.S. Steel's Clairton Works in Clairton, Pa., before enlisting in the Navy in 1940.
NEWS
November 17, 2007
On November 14,2007, WARREN GANS BLOSSER of Bel Air, MD; beloved husband of Claudia B. Zealor Blosser; devoted father of Jack G. Blosser and his wife, Michelle, Kimberly Blosser Haug and her husband, Glenn and the late Warren Gans Blosser, Jr.; loving brother of Robert Blosser and the late John Blosser, Mildred Weaver, Ruth Umble and Margaret Davis. Also survived by three grandchildren, Marlayna Haug, Jenna Blosser and Warren Blosser. Services will be held at Union Chapel United Methodist Church, Joppa, MD on Monday, November 19, 2007 at 11 A.M. Interment will be in the adjoining church cemetery.
NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER and NICOLE FULLER,SUN REPORTER | October 27, 2005
The headstone is inscribed with just one word: Gans. It's a bit of a head-scratcher to some, how a boxing great and native son of Baltimore, Joseph Gans, known in the ring as the "Old Master," ended up with such a brief send-off. He was, after all, Baltimore's first worldwide boxing champion and the first native-born black American to win a worldwide title. His nearly 6,000-pound granite marker once stood with an air of prestige among the many cracked and overturned gravestones at Mount Auburn Cemetery, believed to be the city's oldest cemetery for African-Americans.
NEWS
July 25, 2005
On Sunday, July 24, 2005, HELEN GANS SENKER; beloved wife of late Jerome Senker; devoted mother of Allan H. Senker of Baltimore, MD and Dr. Edward G. Senker of Stamford, Conn.; devoted sister of the late Walter J. Gans, Jr. Also survived by five loving grandchildren and eight loving great grandchildren. Funeral Services and Interment will be held at Hebrew Friendship Cemetery, 3600 E. Baltimore Street on Monday, July 25 at 11 A.M. Please omit flowers. In mourning at 3406 Garrison Farms Road (21208)
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2002
After every decade's census, the party in power in each state redraws legislative and congressional district boundaries to account for population shifts. The idea, ordered by the U.S. Supreme Court, is to create an arithmetically pure landscape for democracy: One person, one vote. Once accomplished, the whole exercise seems arid and silly: The carefully balanced electorate doesn't show. For four decades, American voters have been too lazy or too turned off to turn out. Some say their absence is a vote against a system they don't respect or trust.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1998
"A popular saying at the turn of century was that Baltimore was known to the world as the birthplace of the Star-Spangled Banner, the jurisdiction of Cardinal Gibbons and the home of Joe Gans," said The Sun in 1960.Joe Gans, the small (5 feet 6 inches) and light (133 pounds) welterweight and former oyster shucker, had risen from the obscurity of the Baltimore slums to become the world's lightweight boxing champion in 1902 when he beat Frank Erne.He was champ of the 135-pound class for six years, winning 147 fights and losing only eight, his last in 1908 to Battling Nelson.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 26, 2012
Ruth B. Gans, who had worked in Annapolis as a legislative aide and later for several state agencies, died Jan. 20 of a brain tumor and pneumonia at the Bellhaven Center for Rehabilitation & Nursing Care in Brookhaven, N.Y. The Fells Point resident was 76. The daughter of a manufacturer's representative and a homemaker, Ruth Bogart was born in New York City and moved with her family in 1943 to a home on Oswego Avenue in the Park Heights neighborhood...
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | March 27, 1995
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- Big Country fishes at Kerr Lake. That's K-E-R-R, and he doesn't care that the secret is out, now that he's off to the Final Four."
NEWS
By JULES WEITCOVER and JULES WEITCOVER,Jules Witcover writes, with Jack Germond, a national political column for The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 1992
Washington. -- Barely ten weeks since the official start of the 1992 presidential nominating process in Iowa, the preference of a large number of eligible voters for America's next leader already seems to be in: None of the Above.Poll after poll shows that a significant segment of the electorate wishes that other candidates were running in both parties. The most recent survey by the Times Mirror Center for The People and The Press, for example, found fully two-thirds of all voters polled said they were unhappy with the choices available to them.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.