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By Orlando Sentinel | December 26, 1990
Gangster movies are back and so are sideburns. Could there be a connection? Kathy Weaver thinks so."It's gangster chic," said Weaver, director of education for the Supercuts chain of hairstyling salons.She predicts that fashion-conscious young men will be sporting the look that's big in the latest spate of gangster movies, including "Goodfellas," "Godfather III" and Dustin Hoffman's "Billy Bathgate."Essentially, the hair is long and slicked back on top, but fairly short at the back and sides except for those sideburns on the cheeks.
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NEWS
October 1, 2013
There is an established way to make or change laws: A majority of the House and Senate agree and send their proposed legislation to the president. He then approves or vetoes it ("House sets vote on funding bill; agencies brace for shutdown," Sept. 29). The Republicans try to get around the established process by threatening to hurt lots of people if a certain law isn't changed. No voting, no legislative agreement, just threats. They are just a bunch of gangsters in neckties. William Akers, Baltimore
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NEWS
By Amy P. Ingram and Amy P. Ingram,Contributing Writer | January 11, 1994
You might think people would be reluctant to chance an Italian restaurant decorated in Roaring '20s gangster motif and run by a Sicilian who trades on his nickname -- Lucky Luciano. But you'd be wrong.For 15 years, Lucky Luciano's Ristorante in Crofton has been packing them in, serving up Funghi Ripieni, Scampi Con Salsa D'Aragosta and cappuccino that is personally brewed and served by the owner, "Lucky" Luciano DiSalvo.When he sets the steaming cup of froth on the table, he calls out his trademark line, "Is everybody happy here?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | September 17, 2012
"Every day in every way I am getting better and better. " - Nelson Van Alden What's that, "Boardwalk Empire" without its tragic hero, Jimmy Darmody? What's next, an aviatrix (or "lady flyer" if you prefer) navigating across the continent? As the third season of "Boardwalk" soldiers on sans Jimmy, everyone else in Atlantic City and beyond seems to be aspiring to be a better "them" in 1923. Well, almost everyone (looking at you, Al Capone). For as long as Jimmy was around, he always reminded Nucky Thompson that he couldn't be "half a gangster.
NEWS
By STANLEY CROUCH | January 6, 2000
ONE wonders what the snootiest of the Hamptons people think about the recent shooting that took place at Club New York when Sean "Puffy" Combs' entourage scraped up against some other knuckleheads, and three bystanders were wounded. Society has changed. Wealthy people spent many years trying to keep minorities at a distance. Now they fret over whether they'll be invited to Mr. Combs' East Hampton summer party. During Prohibition, such people used to invite immigrant gangsters up to their Park Avenue parties.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | August 30, 1991
TOKYO -- The former head of the world's biggest securities firm testified yesterday that his company lent a top gangster $117 million that helped him corner a big rail line's stock, then "excessively" pushed the shares to other clients.The firm's actions helped push the stock to a record high and enabled the gangland boss to reap an unknown but admittedly huge profit on an accumulation of 2.6 million shares, said Setsuya Tabuchi, who resigned as chairman of Nomura Securities last month.However, he insisted that "there was absolutely no manipulation" of the railway stock.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 15, 1991
From the silver screen, some fashion wisdom to live by: Don't dress "like a schmuck."In the new testosterone-in-tweeds epic "Mobsters," gangster rookie Christian Slater, already quite rakish in tab-collared shirts and baggy pants, learns this valuable lesson from shadowy mobster F. Murray Abraham.Mr. Abraham tells Mr. Slater what America is really all about -- money -- and says Mr. Slater will never make it big.Why?"Because you dress like a schmuck," Mr. Abraham says, playing Mr. Blackwell to Mr. Slater's Princess Anne.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 20, 1991
Think of Fitzgerald's Jay Gatsby, a romantic egotist to the end. Think of his wonderful shirts. Think of his clothes, his charm, his charisma, his American yearning to be better, to climb in society, to hang out with the swells.Now think of him pulling a snub nose and blowing a sucking chest wound into somebody, and you have "Bugsy."Warren Beatty's best film since "Bonnie and Clyde" and possibly Barry Levinson's best film, period, "Bugsy" is set squarely in the increasingly hard-to-find Neverland of adult moviemaking.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 2, 2004
THOSE WHO didn't make it to see the restored print of Touchez Pas Au Grisbi (in English, "Don't touch the loot!") at the AFI Silver last fall should seize the chance to see it this week at the Charles. This seminal 1954 gangster picture is a great choice to kick off the theater's latest revival calendar. Telling the story of two criminals pushing past their prime - a master thief named Max (Jean Gabin) and his unreliable right-hand man, Riton (Rene Dary) - legendary filmmaker Jacques Becker set the mark high for directors of later Gallic heist films.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 16, 1996
Despite the gaudy title, Zhang Yimou's "Shanghai Triad," which opens today at the Charles, is a muted, even contemplative movie that is less about the gangster trade in the most dangerous city of the '30s than it is about the small epiphanies of humanity that occasionally come in the most unlikely of circumstances to the most unlikely of people.Imagine "The Godfather" through the eyes of a 13-year-old boy just in from the hinterlands of rural Jersey and his dad's pepper farm, and you have an idea of the originality, and the oddity, of the film.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2010
A gang leader who ordered a hit on a member of his own gang whom he suspected of being gay was sentenced Tuesday to life in prison without parole. Timothy E. Rawlings Jr., 24, a former quarterback at Parkville High School and the father of a 3-year-old boy, showed no emotion as Baltimore County Circuit Judge Robert N. Dugan told him that the killing of Steven Parrish, for the sole reason that the victim showed signs of being homosexual, was "senseless, brutal, unprovoked, cold-blooded, premeditated murder.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
Public Enemies provides a welcome shock to the system. This tough-minded, visually electric movie about Great Depression bank robber John Dillinger (Johnny Depp) takes audiences into the center of the action in its opening minutes. It keeps them there as it expands into a bristling chronicle of a country in flux. Without ever telling viewers what to think or how to feel, it raises more questions about the corruption of crime and crime fighting than any expose or thesis. And if it sometimes registers too coolly, by the end it rouses more bruised feelings than any four-hankie weepie.
NEWS
By michael sragow and michael sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 14, 2008
Ken Tucker, Entertainment Weekly's editor-at-large and music critic for NPR's Fresh Air With Terry Gross, wasn't sure he had picked the right subject when he set out to chronicle Scarface Nation: The Ultimate Gangster Movie and How It Changed America (St. Martin's Press). "Scarface wasn't my favorite Brian De Palma movie," he says on the phone from his home in suburban Philadelphia. "I liked Blow Out a lot better." With Al Pacino acquiring a deep tan and adopting a Desi Arnaz accent as the Cuban-American drug lord Tony Montana, who believes that if you have guts in America "the World is Yours," the movie was treated, for my money with good reason, as a bloated, over-hyped event when it premiered in 1983.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 2, 2007
American Gangster, the story of real-life 1960s Harlem super-criminal Frank Lucas (Denzel Washington), wants to be The Godfather, Serpico and that blaxploitation cult classic, Across 110th Street, wrapped into one Superfly chinchilla coat. It plays like a deluxe network-TV miniseries edited to be seen in a single sitting, but with all the nudity, profanity and gore the networks would cut out. The human drama takes a back seat to rise-and-fall criminal milestones that occur every 15 minutes.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | June 22, 2007
You Kill Me kills you softly with its smiles. This scruffy gangster comedy about Frank (Ben Kingsley), an alcoholic hit man for the Polish mob in Buffalo, N.Y., proves that craftiness and hip performances can make a tasty pig-in-a-blanket out of an old and tattered sow's ear. You Kill Me (IFC Films) Starring Ben Kingsley, Tea Leoni, Luke Wilson, Bill Pullman. Directed by John Dahl. Rated R. Time 92 minutes.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | April 24, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Critics of vulgar, violent, gangster-style rap music make a mistake when they write off rap stars as stupid, immoral and self-destructive. They may be immoral and self-destructive, but they're not stupid. As one of my readers observed in a thoughtful e-mail, they're making a rational economic choice. The reader wrote: "I had to stop and ask this question to myself: `Would I call my mother a `ho' or my sister a `bitch' if I could make a couple of million dollars and get out of poverty and live a pretty good life?"
NEWS
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1997
"Cagney," by John McCabe. Knopf. 439 pages. $27.50.Actor James Cagney was a man of contradictions.On screen he personified restless energy and lurking violence, but off screen he was a quiet, introspective, private man who wrote poetry, painted and backed environmental causes.In an industry known for promiscuity and excess, Cagney was faithfully married for 65 years; he avoided parties and rarely drank alcohol. He maintained lifelong personal and professional relationships with his three brothers and one sister, but his minimal contact with his adopted children eventually led to estrangement.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | August 30, 1994
STILL ANOTHER biography of the late Alphonse "Scarface" Capone has appeared ("Capone," by L. Bergreen, Simon and Schuster). In it, the author includes the story of Capone's four-month stay in Baltimore. It is a scholarly, well-documented and authentic (including reporting and observations by H.L. Mencken himself) account, and if you want to know Mr. Bergreen's (and the prevailing) version of that story you will have to read the book.For the insider's story of Capone's time here, there's the version told by the late Menasha ("Menash")
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 25, 2006
All sorts of musical and moviemaking tricks are thrown into the blender for Idlewild, and the result is a passionate, enthralling film that isn't afraid to take chances - even if it sometimes should be. Andre Benjamin and Antwan A. Patton, better known as Andre 3000 and Big Boi of the hip-hop duo OutKast, star respectively as Percival and Rooster, boyhood friends whose musical dreams play out in a Prohibition-era Georgia speakeasy known as Church....
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