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By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
The leader of a Bloods gang network that operated from Western Maryland to the Eastern Shore pleaded guilty to a racketeering charge in federal court Wednesday and was sentenced on the spot to 30 years in prison. Andre Roach, 35, used the nickname Redrum - an allusion to the movie The Shining - and founded a branch of the gang in 2005, according to his plea agreement, directing the sale of drugs and sanctioning beatings of members who ran afoul of a strict code of rules. In addition to trafficking cocaine, heroin, ecstasy and marijuana to customers around Maryland, the gang engaged in violent crime, organizing a murder, attempted murders and home invasions.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
A woman who supplied Black Guerrilla Family gang members with drugs to sell at the Baltimore jail pleaded guilty Wednesday to a conspiracy charge in federal court. Tyesha Mayo, 30, obtained marijuana and prescription pills and handed them off to corrupt corrections officers, who smuggled them past the walls of the Baltimore City Detention Center and into the hands of gang leader Tavon White, according to facts supporting her plea presented in court. In return, White paid Mayo using electronic transfers and cash, according to the statement.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
State and federal prosecutors have had two explanations for how Robert Long ended up dead. In the first, he was killed over a dispute with a drug dealer. In the second, he was killed because he agreed to testify against one of his co-conspirators in a scheme to steal construction equipment. The first explanation — backed up by two eyewitnesses — proved good enough for a Baltimore jury to convict Demetrius Smith of murder in 2010. But authorities now acknowledge that account was wrong, and Smith has been freed.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 7, 2013
Of the many words from the Maryland Court of Special Appeals in the matter of Meredith Cross v. Baltimore City Police Department, I like these best: "Costs to be paid by appellant. " That's double-good news for city taxpayers: We're on the hook for neither the back salary of a police officer who married a convicted murderer nor for the costs of bringing an audacious appeal of her firing to court. What we have here is formal affirmation that a woman has a right to marry anyone she wishes, including a gangster, but not a right to be a Baltimore cop. That was pretty much the court's conclusion Tuesday in the Cross case, echoing Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. from late-19th-century Massachusetts.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
Baltimore police do not have to reinstate an officer who was fired after the department discovered she was married to an incarcerated Dead Man Inc. gang member, an appeals court has ruled. The Court of Special Appeals on Tuesday upheld a decision by Baltimore police to terminate Meredith Cross, who argued that her constitutional rights were violated when she was fired from the department because she married Carlito Cabana –– a convicted murderer and a member of the Dead Man Inc. prison gang.
NEWS
August 13, 2013
A failing Baltimore City Public School system, and lack of both after school programs and recreation centers will continue to increase gang recruitment unless the city acts now. It's not a coincidence that Quintin Poindexter was led behind Windsor Hill Elementary School and killed ( "Family watched, helpless, as gang took their son," Aug. 6). The Baltimore City Schools are becoming gang recruiting institutions and their playgrounds are becoming the killing fields. The city has closed down most recreation centers, and many after school programs are non-existent.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2013
Charged with policing inmates in the Baltimore City Detention Center, correctional officer Jennifer Owens admitted to doing the opposite Tuesday. Owens, who worked as a correctional officer in the Baltimore jail from 2007 to 2013, pleaded guilty to a federal racketeering conspiracy charge Tuesday, accepting a plea agreement that dropped two other criminal counts. Prosecutors say Owens smuggled in marijuana and prescription drugs for a gang leader who fathered two of her children while incarcerated.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2013
Barbara Poindexter saw the death of her son coming. She likens it to watching her mother's health deteriorate. In her son's case, death followed a slow and agonizing descent into gangs and criminal activity. "When my mother came to the end, I was not surprised," Poindexter said. "When my son came to the end, I was not surprised. "I just didn't know when. " On May 4, 2012, Quintin Poindexter got out of a car with three men, who were recorded on surveillance video walking behind Windsor Hills Elementary School.
NEWS
July 21, 2013
The rise in fatal shootings that has claimed dozens of lives in Baltimore City since the beginning of the summer focused attention on the gang violence that police say is responsible for much of the killing. Competing gangs adhere to a rigid code: You kill one of ours, we'll kill one of yours. That's why the vicious cycle of shootings and retaliatory killings persists even when police flood troubled neighborhoods with foot patrols and extra officers on overtime. But Baltimore could learn from the progress police in Los Angeles have made recently toward reducing gang violence.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
A family-run crime enterprise carried out a series of high-wire burglaries, swiping entire safes, cracking open ATMs, and cutting power and phone service to businesses before rushing in, according to federal charges unsealed Thursday. But the flashy robberies were a sideshow to the crew's prescription pill dealing at its home base in an auto shop on a dead-end Southwest Baltimore street, authorities allege. The group also is accused of distributing drugs at Lexington Market and smuggling them into a Jessup prison.
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