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By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
When Julio Martinez crossed the U.S. border illegally more than a decade ago, his attorneys say, he was running for his life, attempting to escape the deadly and pervasive gang he joined in his native El Salvador as a 14-year-old boy. Martinez, who entered the country in 2000 and lived in Middle River for years, is now at the center of a legal question that has split federal courts and that could have significant implications for U.S. immigration...
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
Six months after the seemingly random murder of a 12-year-old boy in East Baltimore, police had not been able to solve the case, and, a prosecutor said in court Tuesday, the investigation had "gone cold. " But then in December 2011, a defendant in a drug case told prosecutors he knew something about the killing. Antwan Mosley told them that the boy, Sean Johnson, was gunned down as members of the Black Guerrilla Family gang lashed out in revenge for an attack on of one of their own. "That was a key break in a tragic homicide," Assistant State's Attorney Kelly Madigan said.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
It's almost a year since federal authorities announced that Tavon White and the Black Guerrilla Family gang had corrupted the Baltimore City Detention Center from the inside out, and this week's New Yorker magazine has an expansive look at the case. Staff writer Jeffrey Toobin casts a close eye over the sexual dynamics in the jail, pointing to misogynistic ideas espoused by the BGF's founder in the 1960s, and repeated up by former Maryland gang leader Eric Brown. George Jackson, who founded the BGF in a California prison, was steeped in many of the left wing ideas popular in the 1960s, but he roundly rejected calls for women's rights and espoused polygamy as a way to care for women who would otherwise go unmarried, according to Toobin.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2014
Two men were convicted Friday of randomly firing into a group of young people, killing a 12-year-old boy and wounding three others in an attempt to "send a message" to their East Baltimore neighbors. In May 2011, prosecutors said, Danyae Robinson, 31, and Derrick Brown, 20, fired at least 15 shots, seeking to avenge the shooting earlier that night of a fellow gang member — even though their victims had nothing to do with their gang's rivals or the earlier shooting. "This was a deplorable, unconscionable act of violence that hurt many and took the life of one of our young people," State's Attorney Gregg Bernstein said in a statement.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
The head of security at the Baltimore City Detention Center has resigned, officials said Tuesday, a move that again leaves an important leadership job at the troubled facility vacant. Eric C. Brown started at the jail in September to help clean up after a scathing federal indictment last spring. Prosecutors alleged that female corrections officers had been having sex with jailed gang members and helping them smuggle contraband into the detention center. The job had been open for months after his predecessor's ouster.
NEWS
By Victor Davis Hanson | December 29, 2013
The gangster state of North Korea became a nuclear power in 2006-2007, despite lots of foreign aid aimed at precluding just such proliferation -- help usually not otherwise accorded such a loony dictatorship. Apparently the civilized world rightly suspected that if nuclear, Pyongyang would either export nuclear material and expertise to other unstable countries, or bully its successful but non-nuclear neighbors -- or both. The United States has given billions of dollars in foreign aid to Pakistan, whose Islamist gangs have spearheaded radical anti-American terrorism.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2013
Gayle Danley called the Wilde Lake Middle School eighth-graders "poets," a label that sounded hip and eclectic and, by the tone of her fiery prose, non-negotiable. After introducing them to the world of "poetry slam" - competitions involving artists who recite their original works - the former national and international slam champion sought a way last week to bring out the teens' inner muses. "Pick up the pencils and write the words: 'You can't do that to me!'" commanded Danley, a Baltimore resident and artist-in-residence who visits middle schools through Baltimore and Washington, teaching students to use poetry to express themselves about the more pressing issues in their lives.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
Over the course of three days in Cherry Hill in January 2011, a former standout high school basketball player was fatally shot and a youth football coach was murdered in front of his family. Those shootings and at least three others in the South Baltimore neighborhood were not disparate incidents, authorities alleged Tuesday, but part of a gang war. Prosecutors along with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and Baltimore police said 26 people have been indicted on racketeering charges after an investigation into the feuding between Cherry Hill gangs called "Up Da Hill" and groups known as "Little Spelman" and "Coppin Court.
NEWS
November 25, 2013
BUCHAREST - The leader of a Romanian gang that stole paintings from a Dutch museum in one of the world's biggest art heists could be sentenced this week to up to 18 years in prison, according to a statement by his lawyer Tuesday. Radu Dogaru's sentencing is among upcoming events this week that also include likely testimony by fascist leaders in Greece, the release of new housing indicators in the United States and the premiere of a new film featuring former  Wire  star Idris Elba.
NEWS
By Justin George, Justin Fenton and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts wants to stop sending officers out on low-priority 911 calls, expand foot patrols and create a unit focused on investigating incidents in which police use force. He proposes assigning homicide detectives to city neighborhoods, beefing up investigative units and sending elite plainclothes officers to more police districts. He wants to install tiny cameras on officers' uniforms and put computer tablets in their hands. A year on the job, Batts on Thursday unveiled an overarching crime-fighting plan he said would bring "much-needed" and "long-sought-after reform" in a department he said has relied too heavily on outdated procedures and technology.
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