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By Victor Davis Hanson | December 29, 2013
The gangster state of North Korea became a nuclear power in 2006-2007, despite lots of foreign aid aimed at precluding just such proliferation -- help usually not otherwise accorded such a loony dictatorship. Apparently the civilized world rightly suspected that if nuclear, Pyongyang would either export nuclear material and expertise to other unstable countries, or bully its successful but non-nuclear neighbors -- or both. The United States has given billions of dollars in foreign aid to Pakistan, whose Islamist gangs have spearheaded radical anti-American terrorism.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2013
Gayle Danley called the Wilde Lake Middle School eighth-graders "poets," a label that sounded hip and eclectic and, by the tone of her fiery prose, non-negotiable. After introducing them to the world of "poetry slam" - competitions involving artists who recite their original works - the former national and international slam champion sought a way last week to bring out the teens' inner muses. "Pick up the pencils and write the words: 'You can't do that to me!'" commanded Danley, a Baltimore resident and artist-in-residence who visits middle schools through Baltimore and Washington, teaching students to use poetry to express themselves about the more pressing issues in their lives.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
Over the course of three days in Cherry Hill in January 2011, a former standout high school basketball player was fatally shot and a youth football coach was murdered in front of his family. Those shootings and at least three others in the South Baltimore neighborhood were not disparate incidents, authorities alleged Tuesday, but part of a gang war. Prosecutors along with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and Baltimore police said 26 people have been indicted on racketeering charges after an investigation into the feuding between Cherry Hill gangs called "Up Da Hill" and groups known as "Little Spelman" and "Coppin Court.
NEWS
November 25, 2013
BUCHAREST - The leader of a Romanian gang that stole paintings from a Dutch museum in one of the world's biggest art heists could be sentenced this week to up to 18 years in prison, according to a statement by his lawyer Tuesday. Radu Dogaru's sentencing is among upcoming events this week that also include likely testimony by fascist leaders in Greece, the release of new housing indicators in the United States and the premiere of a new film featuring former  Wire  star Idris Elba.
NEWS
By Justin George, Justin Fenton and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts wants to stop sending officers out on low-priority 911 calls, expand foot patrols and create a unit focused on investigating incidents in which police use force. He proposes assigning homicide detectives to city neighborhoods, beefing up investigative units and sending elite plainclothes officers to more police districts. He wants to install tiny cameras on officers' uniforms and put computer tablets in their hands. A year on the job, Batts on Thursday unveiled an overarching crime-fighting plan he said would bring "much-needed" and "long-sought-after reform" in a department he said has relied too heavily on outdated procedures and technology.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2013
Baltimore police used battering rams to smash their way into suspected drug dens in a series of pre-dawn raids Tuesday that netted a half-dozen arrests, continuing what authorities describe as aggressive campaign to "dismantle" the Black Guerrilla Family gang. It was the second such strike in less than a week. Officials sharpened their rhetoric against the one-time prison gang they say has been spreading across the city and taking over drug territories through force and intimidation.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 9, 2013
For their joint news conference on Thursday, the police commissioner and state's attorney of Baltimore chose Mund Park on Greenmount Avenue, where, they said, members of the Black Guerrilla Family and their associates held regular meetings. That moment was fraught with symbolism — top cop Anthony Batts, in uniform, and top prosecutor Gregg Bernstein, in a gray suit, reclaiming a public park from a violent gang. But the symbolism grows larger when you consider the place — Greenmount Avenue, between North Avenue and 25th Street — in the context of the long struggles of Baltimore: the riots of 1968, the white flight, the concentration of poverty, the rise in crime, the generally sad reputation of the area, and the long wait for transformative help.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
The leader of a Bloods gang network that operated from Western Maryland to the Eastern Shore pleaded guilty to a racketeering charge in federal court Wednesday and was sentenced on the spot to 30 years in prison. Andre Roach, 35, used the nickname Redrum - an allusion to the movie The Shining - and founded a branch of the gang in 2005, according to his plea agreement, directing the sale of drugs and sanctioning beatings of members who ran afoul of a strict code of rules. In addition to trafficking cocaine, heroin, ecstasy and marijuana to customers around Maryland, the gang engaged in violent crime, organizing a murder, attempted murders and home invasions.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
A woman who supplied Black Guerrilla Family gang members with drugs to sell at the Baltimore jail pleaded guilty Wednesday to a conspiracy charge in federal court. Tyesha Mayo, 30, obtained marijuana and prescription pills and handed them off to corrupt corrections officers, who smuggled them past the walls of the Baltimore City Detention Center and into the hands of gang leader Tavon White, according to facts supporting her plea presented in court. In return, White paid Mayo using electronic transfers and cash, according to the statement.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2013
State and federal prosecutors have had two explanations for how Robert Long ended up dead. In the first, he was killed over a dispute with a drug dealer. In the second, he was killed because he agreed to testify against one of his co-conspirators in a scheme to steal construction equipment. The first explanation — backed up by two eyewitnesses — proved good enough for a Baltimore jury to convict Demetrius Smith of murder in 2010. But authorities now acknowledge that account was wrong, and Smith has been freed.
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