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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts says that the Black Guerrilla Family gang is spurring much of the recent violence in the city as it tries to expand its reach.  Batts, who recently took over as commissioner after working 30 years on the West Coast, asked his commanders to draw up "conflict diagrams" so he could better understand the web of connections driving crime in Baltimore.  He said those diagrams showed that the Black Guerrilla...
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Brandon Finney worked at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center for only a few months, but he had quickly earned a reputation as hardworking and motivated. His hospital colleagues came Tuesday — some in pink scrubs— along with other mourners to the chapel at the Vaughn C. Greene Funeral home in Randallstown to pay their respects to the young father. Finney died last week after he was fatally shot on his way home from work as he waited at a Saratoga Street bus stop. Police said Finney was an innocent bystander who was used as a human shield amid a gang fight between the rival Black Guerrilla Family and the Bloods.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2010
Baltimore officials suspended more than $1 million in city funds for anti-violence programs Monday after workers at a West Baltimore community center that has received taxpayer dollars were accused of operating as a front for gang activities. Federal authorities indicted 13 people on heroin distribution charges, including at least two who were employees of Communities Organized to Improve Life Inc., or COIL, a nonprofit organization that runs adult literacy programs and other outreach services, according to court records and officials.
NEWS
Jessica Anderson and Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
As Baltimore's mayor on Wednesday consoled the family of a hospital worker used as a human shield during a gang shooting downtown, elected officials and community activists called on the city to do more to combat gang violence. The killing of Brandon Finney, a 25-year-old Maryland Shock Trauma Center technician, has rattled the city. He was waiting to catch a bus home after working a night shift Sunday when, police say, members of the Black Guerrilla Family targeted a rival Bloods member, who pulled Finney in front of him. Both died.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
Baltimore Police say a recent shooting in Waverly that injured a 16-year-old girl was gang-related, and detectives have charged a 22-year-old man in the case. Derrod Miller, of the 300 block of E. 33rd St., was charged Tuesday with attempted first-degree murder in connection with the July 22 shooting. According to police, the teenage victim was walking in the 500 block of E. 35th St. with others at about 11:30 p.m. when she noticed a group of people in the south side of the block who appared to be watching them.  One of the men broke off from the group and began walking toward them, then opened fire "indiscriminately" in her direction.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | justin.fenton@baltsun.com | March 14, 2010
Police identified a man who was shot and killed Friday afternoon in Charles Village as Donatello Fenner, a 22-year-old who has long been on law enforcement radar as a leader of a North Baltimore gang. Police found Fenner with several gunshot wounds about 4:20 p.m. in an alley in the 2600 block of N. Calvert St. Fenner was said to be a ranking member of the Young Gorilla Family gang, and that group has been linked to much of the violence recently in the Barclay neighborhood, just south of where Fenner was found wounded, according to police.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan | nick.madigan@baltsun.com | February 23, 2010
When a group of gang members, affiliates of the Bloods, discovered that one of their own had sent text messages on his cell phone "that were gay in nature," a prosecutor said, they decided to kill him. The body of Steven Parrish was found May 29, 2008, in a wooded area behind his home on Thornhurst Court in Randallstown. He had been stabbed and beaten, and a red bandana covered his face. His MP3 player, digital camera and pocket knife, items he always carried, were gone. He had turned 18 four days earlier.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2010
A Baltimore man accused of ordering several murders as a leader in a high-profile gang was sentenced in federal court Tuesday to two life terms. Terrence "Squeaky" Richardson, 30, was convicted by a jury in March of racketeering and conspiring to sell drugs, as a leader of the Pasadena Denver Lanes set of the Bloods. Prosecutors also allege that Richardson ordered several murders, including the execution-style shooting of Brandon Everline in July 2008, incidents U.S. District Judge William D. Quarles heavily relied on in handing down his sentence.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2010
An inmate who was a member of a violent gang run from a state penitentiary in Western Maryland has been sentenced to life in federal prison, and an accomplice has been sent away for 20 years, according to the Maryland U.S. attorney's office. The two men, sentenced Friday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, are the second and third of more than two dozen members of a Bloods gang subset called Tree Top Pirus set to be jailed as a result of a sweeping indictment filed in early 2008.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
Murder charges against Perry Roark, a reputed co-founder of the violent Dead Man Inc. gang, were dropped Monday by Anne Arundel County prosecutors, according to a spokeswoman for the State's Attorney's Office. However, Roark, 42, still faces federal charges. Last year, Roark was close to completing his prison stint for a lumber store robbery. However, an accusation that Roark killed a prisoner in 1994 at the Maryland House of Correction kept him incarcerated. In November, Roark was among nearly two dozen alleged members of the gang — which started in Maryland prisons and spread to prisons around the country — who were indicted on federal racketeering charges.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 24, 2014
Tuesday morning in a coffee shop, I heard someone wonder why Brandon Finney, the Shock Trauma surgical technician who was shot to death Sunday night, had been standing near Lexington Market at such a late hour. What was he doing there at 11:30? The question suggested that anyone who ventured after hours near the city's historic market - notable for fresh fish and produce on the inside, and too many drug addicts on the outside - must be either up to no good or asking for trouble. But the answer, it turns out, was simple: Brandon Finney had been waiting for the bus. That's what most people do in Baltimore - the working, contributing, responsible people, that is, as opposed to the losers who degrade and debase the city with their guns and cowardice, with stupidity and recklessness.
NEWS
Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2014
A Maryland Shock Trauma Center technician was waiting for a bus home after work Sunday night when he was "used as a human shield" and killed during a gang shooting, Baltimore police said. Police said Tuesday that they have arrested two members of the Black Guerrilla Family in the death of Brandon Finney, a 25-year-old father who was saving up for his first car. The intended target - a Bloods gang member, Christopher Camphor, 20 - was also killed in the attack, police said. Finney's death drew dozens - some who barely knew him - for a vigil Tuesday night at the bus stop where he died at Saratoga and North Paca streets.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
A Baltimore judge this week ruled to allow city prosecutors to withhold identifying witness information from defendants in the sweeping case against alleged members of the Black Guerrilla Family gang. Judge Sylvester B. Cox on Tuesday granted a protective order, requested by the state's attorney's office, on any materials that could expose witnesses to harm or intimidation, after hearing a detective describe the fears witnesses had about cooperating with the investigation. Forty-eight suspects accused of being members of the BGF gang, which operated a violent, widespread drug trade in the city and corrupted the Baltimore City Detention Center, were indicted last November.
NEWS
By Hal Riedl | July 20, 2014
Back when Robert Ehrlich was governor of Maryland, I was interviewing men newly committed to state prison and suspected of gang affiliations. After years in denial, Maryland was just beginning to realize that gangs were very active behind the walls. Among them was a "new" incarnation of BGF (Black Guerrilla Family) that had taken its name from, but was not otherwise beholden to, the BGF that dated from the 1960s. I got to know Lt. Santiago Morales, an astute gang investigator at Baltimore City Detention Center, and we shared information.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
A Baltimore jury failed to reach a verdict Tuesday in a high-profile murder case, leading a city judge to declare a mistrial in city prosecutors' first battle with what they say is a murderous group within the Black Guerrilla Family gang. A juror who declined to give her name said a majority on the panel had been leaning toward acquitting David Hunter, an alleged BGF member who was charged with murder in the broad-daylight killing of heroin dealer Henry Mills on Greenmount Avenue three years ago. At its heart, Hunter's case was a simple matter: The jury was asked to weigh the credibility of eyewitnesses to Mills' June 2011 death.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
It wasn't easy to get suspected Black Guerrilla Family leader Gerald Johnson on the phone, investigators learned as they tried to build a case against him last year. Rather than answer calls himself, he would often use a female associate to screen his conversations. The conversations would often play out like this one summarized in court documents: "Where Geezy at?" a suspected gang member asked, using Johnson's nickname. After a woman replied, he continued, "Put him on the phone.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 29, 2010
A federal jury convicted two Maryland gang leaders, one of whom produced the infamous "Stop Snitching" videos, of racketeering Thursday evening, after two days of deliberation. Sherman Pride (also known as "Dark Black" and "DB"), 35, of Salisbury and Ronnie Thomas ("Skinny Suge" and "Tall Vialz"), 36, of Baltimore face a maximum of 20 years in prison for the racketeering conspiracy. Thomas also faces a maximum of life in prison for an additional drug conviction. According to trial testimony, the men were members of the Bloods' violent Tree Top Piru set, which dealt drugs throughout the state and conspired to commit murder and robbery.
NEWS
February 27, 2008
Organized crime was once synonymous with the Mafia. Not anymore, and there's no better example of what law enforcement is up against today than the alleged criminal enterprise described in a federal indictment unsealed Monday in Baltimore. The membership of the Bloods' Tree Top Piru may differ by race, locale and ethnicity from La Cosa Nostra, but criminal activity, violence and murder are their shared pursuits. The indictment against 28 alleged Bloods members is a primer on gang culture, its origins and its prevalence in state prisons.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2014
A surveillance camera near the East Baltimore murder scene spied a group from the Black Guerrilla Family gathered to congratulate a gang member on a job well done - a long-time rival was dead and a prior killing avenged. Henry Mills had been a BGF target since the gang started to take over the drug trade along a stretch of Greenmount Avenue years before, and he was suspected of murdering a senior BGF figure, authorities say. By 2011 Mills' insistence on running a freelance heroin operation on gang territory was too much to tolerate.
NEWS
May 23, 2014
The United States grants asylum protection to immigrants of special humanitarian concern who were persecuted in their home countries because of their membership in a particular group and who aren't barred from eligibility because of some past crime or potential danger. We typically think of asylum recipients as being refugees forced to flee religious, ethnic or political torment. But what about former gang members? A 33-year-old Baltimore County man who entered the country illegally from El Salvador in 2000 is seeking asylum as a defense against deportation.
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