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NEWS
December 24, 1991
The fratricide going on in the Republic of Georgia, a fertile and historic land on the shores of the Black Sea, is a stark reminder of the potential for violence in the former Soviet Union. About the only good thing that may come out of this senseless bloodletting is the possibility that Georgia, the only holdout among former Soviet republics, may get a new, democratic leader and join the new Commonwealth of Independent States.The confrontation in Georgia has been building for months as opposition to President Zviad Gamsakhurdia's autocratic rule mounted.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 15, 1993
MOSCOW -- Bowing to a resignation threat by Georgian leader Eduard A. Shevardnadze, Georgia's Parliament imposed a two-month state of emergency on the war-ravaged country yesterday to combat a wave of criminal and paramilitary violence.The vote came late in the evening, after Mr. Shevardnadze reacted to the Parliament's reluctance to impose the emergency by tendering his resignation during a televised legislative session and stalking out of the hall, saying, "I'm fed up with it all."Later, the former Soviet foreign minister and KGB official appeared before a rally of 10,000 supporters to say he would retract his resignation only if Parliament approved the emergency and agreed to suspend its own actions for three months.
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NEWS
April 16, 1991
When Zviad Gamsakhurdia was elected Georgia's president Sunday, he was given the power to declare war, to institute martial law and presidential rule and to revoke or grant citizenship. These powers illustrate that the republic bordering Turkey is dead-serious in its attempt to secede from the Soviet Union. They also suggest that, unlike the calm and orderly Baltic republics, Georgia fully expects violence in its rebellion against the Kremlin.Bloodshed is a foregone conclusion with a leader like Mr. Gamsakhurdia.
NEWS
October 22, 1992
Congratulations are in order to Edward Shevardnadze. In recent elections, the one-time Soviet foreign minister was overwhelmingly elected to head the government of his native Georgia.At first glance, nothing much would seem to have changed. After all, Mr. Shevardnadze has effectively been the top man in Georgia since March, when he was called in to stop his Black Sea republic's slide to anarchy and civil war. Yet this past weekend's vote will give him a badly needed popular mandate to complete that difficult job.Georgia was the first former Soviet republic to hold parliamentary elections back in 1990, when the Kremlin's controls were faltering throughout the empire and communism was about to collapse.
NEWS
January 8, 1992
Recent events in Georgia, a former Soviet republic on the shores of the Black Sea, underscore how quickly euphoria can turn into tragedy.In only seven months as president, power went so quickly into the head of Zviad Gamsakhurdia, a nationalist hero, that his former allies turned against him in a violent bid to oust him from office. Early Monday, the 52-year-old translator of Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson and Allen Ginsberg slipped out of Georgia, leaving his loyalists to continue the bloody battle against the opposition.
NEWS
January 7, 1992
In the end, Georgian President Zviad Gamsakhurdia was a coward."I will hold until death," he declared on Christmas Day, foxholed in a bunker as his loyalists were trying to keep opposition gunners from taking over the government complex. Yesterday, he ignominiously fled in the cover of darkness to a neighboring republic after realizing he had lost a bloody struggle for power. "Not only the Georgia people but all the democratic forces of the world will celebrate this victory," a rebel commander declared.
NEWS
September 19, 1991
Events unfolding in Georgia serve as a painful but necessary reminder of the fragility of democracy in various parts of the former Soviet empire.Although Russia and Ukraine, along with Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, may have relatively good long-term prospects for building societies based on the rule of law, many other former parts of the Soviet Union are not likely to fare as well. A thinly disguised communist government is in power in Azerbaijan. Several of the Central Asian republics are democratic only in their rhetoric.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 10, 1991
MOSCOW -- The U.S. delegation to a major human rights conference and the Russian Parliament both sharply criticized yesterday the rights record of the republic of Georgia and its firebrand president, Zviad Gamsakhurdia.The twin attacks, apparently not coordinated with each other, were a dramatic reminder that the dismantling of the Soviet Communist empire is no guarantee of an end to political repression.They came as Russian television was describing the situation in Georgia as explosive, with the republican police force squaring off at President Gamsakhurdia's orders against the recently formed Georgian National Guard, which has broken with the president.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 15, 1993
MOSCOW -- Bowing to a resignation threat by Georgian leader Eduard A. Shevardnadze, Georgia's Parliament imposed a two-month state of emergency on the war-ravaged country yesterday to combat a wave of criminal and paramilitary violence.The vote came late in the evening, after Mr. Shevardnadze reacted to the Parliament's reluctance to impose the emergency by tendering his resignation during a televised legislative session and stalking out of the hall, saying, "I'm fed up with it all."Later, the former Soviet foreign minister and KGB official appeared before a rally of 10,000 supporters to say he would retract his resignation only if Parliament approved the emergency and agreed to suspend its own actions for three months.
NEWS
October 22, 1992
Congratulations are in order to Edward Shevardnadze. In recent elections, the one-time Soviet foreign minister was overwhelmingly elected to head the government of his native Georgia.At first glance, nothing much would seem to have changed. After all, Mr. Shevardnadze has effectively been the top man in Georgia since March, when he was called in to stop his Black Sea republic's slide to anarchy and civil war. Yet this past weekend's vote will give him a badly needed popular mandate to complete that difficult job.Georgia was the first former Soviet republic to hold parliamentary elections back in 1990, when the Kremlin's controls were faltering throughout the empire and communism was about to collapse.
NEWS
January 8, 1992
Recent events in Georgia, a former Soviet republic on the shores of the Black Sea, underscore how quickly euphoria can turn into tragedy.In only seven months as president, power went so quickly into the head of Zviad Gamsakhurdia, a nationalist hero, that his former allies turned against him in a violent bid to oust him from office. Early Monday, the 52-year-old translator of Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson and Allen Ginsberg slipped out of Georgia, leaving his loyalists to continue the bloody battle against the opposition.
NEWS
January 7, 1992
In the end, Georgian President Zviad Gamsakhurdia was a coward."I will hold until death," he declared on Christmas Day, foxholed in a bunker as his loyalists were trying to keep opposition gunners from taking over the government complex. Yesterday, he ignominiously fled in the cover of darkness to a neighboring republic after realizing he had lost a bloody struggle for power. "Not only the Georgia people but all the democratic forces of the world will celebrate this victory," a rebel commander declared.
NEWS
January 2, 1992
ChristmasEditor: In his Christmas Day column, ''Just Whose Tree Is It, Anyway?'', Professor Simon Schama makes the oft-repeated claim that the choice of the date Dec. 25 for the celebration of Christmas was an attempt by Christians to ''supersede'' the popular Roman festival of Saturnalia.While there is some truth to this contention, your readers should know that this is not the whole story. In fact, there is good evidence that already in the third century Christians were celebrating the feast days of Dec. 25 (Christmas)
NEWS
December 24, 1991
The fratricide going on in the Republic of Georgia, a fertile and historic land on the shores of the Black Sea, is a stark reminder of the potential for violence in the former Soviet Union. About the only good thing that may come out of this senseless bloodletting is the possibility that Georgia, the only holdout among former Soviet republics, may get a new, democratic leader and join the new Commonwealth of Independent States.The confrontation in Georgia has been building for months as opposition to President Zviad Gamsakhurdia's autocratic rule mounted.
NEWS
September 19, 1991
Events unfolding in Georgia serve as a painful but necessary reminder of the fragility of democracy in various parts of the former Soviet empire.Although Russia and Ukraine, along with Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, may have relatively good long-term prospects for building societies based on the rule of law, many other former parts of the Soviet Union are not likely to fare as well. A thinly disguised communist government is in power in Azerbaijan. Several of the Central Asian republics are democratic only in their rhetoric.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 10, 1991
MOSCOW -- The U.S. delegation to a major human rights conference and the Russian Parliament both sharply criticized yesterday the rights record of the republic of Georgia and its firebrand president, Zviad Gamsakhurdia.The twin attacks, apparently not coordinated with each other, were a dramatic reminder that the dismantling of the Soviet Communist empire is no guarantee of an end to political repression.They came as Russian television was describing the situation in Georgia as explosive, with the republican police force squaring off at President Gamsakhurdia's orders against the recently formed Georgian National Guard, which has broken with the president.
NEWS
By Leslie H. Gelb | May 31, 1991
LAST SUNDAY, 87 percent of Georgian voters cast their ballots for Zviad Gamsakhurdia and independence from Moscow. On the same day, Saudi fundamentalists petitioned their king to broaden participation in government.The proliferating number of American Savonarolas who preach democracy as the salvation for U.S. foreign policy surely will rejoice at the news. The general sentiment is terrific, but its application at this time in the Soviet Union and the Middle East is highly questionable.The danger is that the Savonarolas often reduce democracy to "free elections," and free elections can be a trap.
NEWS
January 2, 1992
ChristmasEditor: In his Christmas Day column, ''Just Whose Tree Is It, Anyway?'', Professor Simon Schama makes the oft-repeated claim that the choice of the date Dec. 25 for the celebration of Christmas was an attempt by Christians to ''supersede'' the popular Roman festival of Saturnalia.While there is some truth to this contention, your readers should know that this is not the whole story. In fact, there is good evidence that already in the third century Christians were celebrating the feast days of Dec. 25 (Christmas)
NEWS
By Leslie H. Gelb | May 31, 1991
LAST SUNDAY, 87 percent of Georgian voters cast their ballots for Zviad Gamsakhurdia and independence from Moscow. On the same day, Saudi fundamentalists petitioned their king to broaden participation in government.The proliferating number of American Savonarolas who preach democracy as the salvation for U.S. foreign policy surely will rejoice at the news. The general sentiment is terrific, but its application at this time in the Soviet Union and the Middle East is highly questionable.The danger is that the Savonarolas often reduce democracy to "free elections," and free elections can be a trap.
NEWS
April 16, 1991
When Zviad Gamsakhurdia was elected Georgia's president Sunday, he was given the power to declare war, to institute martial law and presidential rule and to revoke or grant citizenship. These powers illustrate that the republic bordering Turkey is dead-serious in its attempt to secede from the Soviet Union. They also suggest that, unlike the calm and orderly Baltic republics, Georgia fully expects violence in its rebellion against the Kremlin.Bloodshed is a foregone conclusion with a leader like Mr. Gamsakhurdia.
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