Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGames Workshop
IN THE NEWS

Games Workshop

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2002
Games Workshop has always done business, quite literally, in a world of its own. Two worlds, to be more precise: one populated by elves, ogres and rat-men, the other by futuristic Space Marines and the Dark Eldar army. Games Workshop created those two worlds for War- hammer and Warhammer 40,000, table-top battle games that have built the company into a $135 million-a-year global enterprise. It makes thousands of metal soldiers who live and fight in them. It publishes a magazine, even novels about them.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kayla Bawroski, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
Prepare for battle, Baltimore, because a wave of miniature armies is on its way this weekend. Watch out for the Wood Elves of Warhammer, whose loyalty to good or evil is unknown, and make way for the heroic Hobbits of the Lord of the Rings. These armies and more will meet at Games Day 2010, an event taking place at the Baltimore Convention Center for Games Workshop's three board games: Warhammer, Warhammer 40,000 and Lord of the Rings Strategy Battle Game. It's about more than war this weekend, though.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUN STAFF | June 19, 2003
Got game? If so, make your way to the Baltimore Convention Center tomorrow and Saturday. The annual Games Day, sponsored by Games Workshop, a producer of tabletop battle games, features gaming events for everyone from beginners to experts. Participants (or "gamers") can take part in registered games, open gaming, the Games Day tournaments and the Golden Demon Painting Competition. Or visitors can watch Sabertooth Games demonstrations, meet guests from the Games Workshop design studio and attend gaming seminars.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Coffren and John Coffren,john.coffren@baltsun.com | November 13, 2008
There's nothing quite like getting together with a few friends, assembling your troops and waging war in your parents' kitchen. That's what John Simpson of Ocean Township, N.J., does most weekends when he plays the tabletop battle game Warhammer 40K. He and his friends eschew Wii and PlayStation in favor of a 20-year-old board game. And even though there are Warhammer-themed computer games, fans like Simpson, 17, remain loyal. "I prefer the board game because you can do whatever you want," he says.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2000
It is the early 15th century and a ragged army of skeleton soldiers is charging the "Empire's" fort to burn down the town of Kroneburg. The troops charge at the Empire knights, who put up a valiant fight and manage to take out some of the enemy soldiers. Both sides retreat, and the fort is safe for the moment. Considering the fallen soldiers were inch-high, hand-painted pewter miniatures duking it out on a landscape made of insulation foam, the battle wasn't literally hard-fought, but Scott Perry watched the military maneuvers with pride nonetheless.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kayla Bawroski, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
Prepare for battle, Baltimore, because a wave of miniature armies is on its way this weekend. Watch out for the Wood Elves of Warhammer, whose loyalty to good or evil is unknown, and make way for the heroic Hobbits of the Lord of the Rings. These armies and more will meet at Games Day 2010, an event taking place at the Baltimore Convention Center for Games Workshop's three board games: Warhammer, Warhammer 40,000 and Lord of the Rings Strategy Battle Game. It's about more than war this weekend, though.
FEATURES
By Lara M. Zeises and Lara M. Zeises,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1997
Tim Van Dusen makes no apologies for his job.At age 32, he's got the official-sounding title of hobby promotions manager for Games Workshop. The Baltimore-area company produces and markets Warhammer, a line of games that pits science fiction or fantasy armies against each other across tabletop battlefields. It's a job that demands he travel the country, attending sci-fi and games conventions and teaching the masses the gospel according to Warhammer.In other words, he's paid to play with toys.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Coffren and John Coffren,john.coffren@baltsun.com | November 13, 2008
There's nothing quite like getting together with a few friends, assembling your troops and waging war in your parents' kitchen. That's what John Simpson of Ocean Township, N.J., does most weekends when he plays the tabletop battle game Warhammer 40K. He and his friends eschew Wii and PlayStation in favor of a 20-year-old board game. And even though there are Warhammer-themed computer games, fans like Simpson, 17, remain loyal. "I prefer the board game because you can do whatever you want," he says.
FEATURES
By Patrick McGuire and Patrick McGuire,Staff Writer | March 24, 1993
So, you think you know elves. OK, spot quiz: You're out on day walking your elven army when your path is suddenly blocked by an obnoxious horde of goblins, orcs, the odd stone troll and a wagonload of snotlings. You heard me, snotlings.Do you: A) fire your repeating bolt thrower into the orcs; B) charge your Knights of the Silver Helm into the goblins; C) maneuver your company of High Elf Bowmen for a shot at the Troll; D) snap out of it because you're a serious grown-up with a very real mortgage, you're wearing wingtips for gosh sakes, and you have a walk that needs to be shoveled?
NEWS
By TIMOTHY B. WHEELER and TIMOTHY B. WHEELER,SUN REPORTER | June 10, 2006
If you think the Baltimore-Washington area is too crowded, just where would you put an additional 1.2 million people if you had to? That was the challenge taken up yesterday by 250 planners, developers, community activists and elected officials from throughout Central Maryland. United by little more than a belief that the region cannot afford to keep growing the way it has been, people frequently at odds over development plans hunched over tables in the Baltimore Convention Center and played a good-natured planning game with a serious intent.
NEWS
By TIMOTHY B. WHEELER and TIMOTHY B. WHEELER,SUN REPORTER | June 10, 2006
If you think the Baltimore-Washington area is too crowded, just where would you put an additional 1.2 million people if you had to? That was the challenge taken up yesterday by 250 planners, developers, community activists and elected officials from throughout Central Maryland. United by little more than a belief that the region cannot afford to keep growing the way it has been, people frequently at odds over development plans hunched over tables in the Baltimore Convention Center and played a good-natured planning game with a serious intent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SUN STAFF | June 19, 2003
Got game? If so, make your way to the Baltimore Convention Center tomorrow and Saturday. The annual Games Day, sponsored by Games Workshop, a producer of tabletop battle games, features gaming events for everyone from beginners to experts. Participants (or "gamers") can take part in registered games, open gaming, the Games Day tournaments and the Golden Demon Painting Competition. Or visitors can watch Sabertooth Games demonstrations, meet guests from the Games Workshop design studio and attend gaming seminars.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2002
Games Workshop has always done business, quite literally, in a world of its own. Two worlds, to be more precise: one populated by elves, ogres and rat-men, the other by futuristic Space Marines and the Dark Eldar army. Games Workshop created those two worlds for War- hammer and Warhammer 40,000, table-top battle games that have built the company into a $135 million-a-year global enterprise. It makes thousands of metal soldiers who live and fight in them. It publishes a magazine, even novels about them.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2000
It is the early 15th century and a ragged army of skeleton soldiers is charging the "Empire's" fort to burn down the town of Kroneburg. The troops charge at the Empire knights, who put up a valiant fight and manage to take out some of the enemy soldiers. Both sides retreat, and the fort is safe for the moment. Considering the fallen soldiers were inch-high, hand-painted pewter miniatures duking it out on a landscape made of insulation foam, the battle wasn't literally hard-fought, but Scott Perry watched the military maneuvers with pride nonetheless.
FEATURES
By Lara M. Zeises and Lara M. Zeises,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1997
Tim Van Dusen makes no apologies for his job.At age 32, he's got the official-sounding title of hobby promotions manager for Games Workshop. The Baltimore-area company produces and markets Warhammer, a line of games that pits science fiction or fantasy armies against each other across tabletop battlefields. It's a job that demands he travel the country, attending sci-fi and games conventions and teaching the masses the gospel according to Warhammer.In other words, he's paid to play with toys.
FEATURES
By Patrick McGuire and Patrick McGuire,Staff Writer | March 24, 1993
So, you think you know elves. OK, spot quiz: You're out on day walking your elven army when your path is suddenly blocked by an obnoxious horde of goblins, orcs, the odd stone troll and a wagonload of snotlings. You heard me, snotlings.Do you: A) fire your repeating bolt thrower into the orcs; B) charge your Knights of the Silver Helm into the goblins; C) maneuver your company of High Elf Bowmen for a shot at the Troll; D) snap out of it because you're a serious grown-up with a very real mortgage, you're wearing wingtips for gosh sakes, and you have a walk that needs to be shoveled?
BUSINESS
November 14, 2004
These events are scheduled at the Baltimore Convention Center. Nov. 15-16 : Governors Conference on Housing. Estimated attendance: 850. Nov. 17-21 : American Towman Truck Expo. Estimated attendance: 8,000+. Nov. 18-20 : Games Day Workshop. Estimated attendance: 3,500+. Nov. 18-22 : National Council for Social Studies convention. Estimated attendance: 6,000+. Nov. 30-Dec. 2 : Mid-Atlantic Technology Conference and Exposition trade show. Estimated attendance: 3,000+. Contact number: 301-738-6022.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.