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BUSINESS
By JULIE TAMAKI | October 5, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- Sean Spector was sitting in his darkened bedroom at 2 a.m., engrossed in a marathon session on the video game Halo, when he caught an entrepreneurial opportunity in his cross hairs: Why not do for gaming what Netflix Inc. had done for movies? Spector was nearly done saving the galaxy from alien bad guys when he realized that it took only a few days to play through a game that cost him $50. "The challenge of being a gamer is that you can never afford to play all the games you want to play," said Spector, who teamed up in 2002 with fellow video game zealot Jung Suh to found GameFly Inc., a Los Angeles-based firm that charges customers a monthly fee to rent video games by mail.
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SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | September 26, 2005
As 16 pairs of players worked their well-developed video-game muscles and dozens of already-vanquished competitors whooped and hollered around them, Marshon Floyd leaned over to an onlooker and shouted, "This is the real Sunday football right here!" It sure looked that way. If the fact that the local NFL team was off yesterday bothered any of the nearly 350 participants in the Baltimore Madden Challenge qualifier, none of them showed it. They packed into a tent set up at the Inner Harbor and kept it packed from the first matches just after 10 a.m. until the championship game, which ended just before 6 p.m. To get as good at the Madden '06 video game (released last month to the usual retail-store chaos)
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2005
Fourth down and seven. Patrick Blair's Indianapolis Colts are losing, 13-8, with just two minutes left in the game. Thirteen-year-old Patrick, at the controls of an Xbox at an Electronics Boutique store yesterday, tells his friend and competitor, Colby Giacubeno, "I'm going up the gut, I'm telling you right now." Colby, also 13, replies, "I'm sending everybody." Patrick passes the ball, Colby intercepts and runs it back for a touchdown. "See ya! See ya!" Colby taunts as one of his Atlanta Falcons sprints down the field.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2005
As the youngest of eight children, Mary Key honed her competitive edge early. The Johns Hopkins sophomore never shied from backyard football, soccer and basketball games with her older siblings. It didn't matter that some of them were much older and bigger; she just wanted to play. Her father, Bart Key, said she gravitated toward sports even as a tot. "When we would go to the grocery store and it had that big bin of balls of all sizes, I could never get her past them," he said. "The earliest memories I have are of sports," said Mary Key, 19. "I've been playing my whole life."
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz | May 5, 2005
I DRIVE A BUICK. Before that, I drove a Dodge Caravan. These are not exactly the hottest cars on the planet, but each served my purposes at the time I bought it. So there you have it - the confession of guy who likes boring cars. Given this character flaw, what would I do if someone asked me to review a new Maserati? Sure, I could report that it went like a bat out of hell when I stomped on the gas, but would I know whether it's faster than a Lamborghini or handles better than a Porsche?
NEWS
By Martin Kerrigan and Martin Kerrigan,Baltimoresun.com Staff | April 28, 2005
PlayStation 2 owners jealous of the superb, Xbox-only action title "Ninja Gaiden" now have their own high-budget hack 'n slasher to brag about. "God of War" blesses gamers with a visual, aural and gameplay feast unlike anything previously seen on PS2. Set in ancient Greece, you play as Kratos, a brutal warrior. Your life is saved on the battlefield by the god Aries. In return, you're morphed into a nigh-invincible walking slaughterhouse, and you seek to destroy the god to escape your personal hell.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2004
In the beginning, the Internet was seen as the Great Isolater for video gamers. While online, they could battle foes as far away as Japan for weeks without ever leaving their homes. Gaming addicts holed up in their rooms for days at a time, never setting foot outside (except maybe to tip the pizza delivery guy). It was a very lonely time. But as the Internet matures, video gaming is going outdoors - in the form of computer Local Area Network (LAN) and video console parties. Gamers are forming clubs and renting out bars and firehouses in Maryland to throw these bashes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tamara Chuang and Tamara Chuang,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 14, 2004
In a bizarre, parallel universe, computer gamers are treated like rock stars. They earn six-figure salaries. They buy insurance for their fingers. Oh, wait - that's not a parallel universe. It's South Korea. Gamers are also celebrities in China and Europe. But only about two dozen U.S. players survive solely on money made from corporate sponsorships and tournament winnings. However, that's progress. Five years ago, there were none. Local tournaments have morphed into regional and national events.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victor Godinez and Victor Godinez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 2, 2004
How good is Doom 3? After an intense, if not quite comprehensive, shootout on my PC, I must say that id Software has made the scariest game ever - but it's not a revolution in game play. The game starts off much like Half-Life as you arrive at a Mars research lab and make your way to a command post to get an assignment. At this point, there's a clear sense of, well, impending doom. You soon receive your first mission: Retrieve a scientist who has wandered off. Armed at first with nothing but your fists, and later a flashlight and pistol, you make your way into the shadowy depths of the base.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victor Godinez and Victor Godinez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 5, 2004
It's easy to forget that consoles aren't the only game in town. Sales of games for video consoles such as the PlayStation 2, Xbox and GameCube hit $5.8 billion last year. But PC games raked in a respectable $1.2 billion with much less fanfare than their console counterparts. Now a handful of companies are hoping they can boost computer game sales by adopting a new way for PC gamers to buy and play their favorite games. Call it the all-you-can-eat buffet model. These companies are banking that gamers, instead of driving to a store, browsing through crowded shelves and maybe purchasing one $50 PC game, will subscribe to what is essentially an online streaming service.
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