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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | April 30, 2012
News Roundup •••• Some extremely juicy details about the exciting “God of War: Ascension” have surfaced, with some nuts and bolts of how the new multiplayer mode will function. Add this to your list of “reasons I own a PS3.” [ USA Today ] ••••  Evidence is pointing to the first bit of long-awaited “Skyrim” DLC being a) not far off and b) having something to do with Snow Elves and crossbows. Let's be honest, the “Skyrim” DLC could be anything and we'd all buy it sight unseen.
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SPORTS
By Louis Krauss, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
It's a tense moment in the Xanadu game store in Arbutus. The grand finals of the weekly tournament for Super Smash Bros. “Project M” have just begun. The room is crammed with players, televisions and Wii game systems, but everyone's attention is fixed on the one big screen in the corner, where two final players are duking it out. Smash Bros. is a video game that pits Nintendo characters - think Super Mario, the Italian plumber, Donkey Kong, the agile ape and Princess Peach, the gal who swings a mean parasol - against one another in a matchup that's part all-star game, part glorified sumo-wrestling match.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | April 13, 2012
News Roundup •••• It was a busy week down in Bethesda, with the “Skyrim” developers trademarking the game's signature “Fus Ro Dah” shout. Crap, now I owe them $17. More pertient to gamers is the announcement that over 200 voice commands will be added via a free Kinect support download for Xbox 360 users later this month. [ PC Ga mer , PC Mag ] •••• ... but the National Academy of Video Game Testers and Reviews says “Minecraft” is better.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alexa Cottman-Robinson and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
When you think of rock music you probably don't think about "Super Mario Bros. " or "Space Invaders. " But a subculture of video game rock bands? Yes, it's a thing. And now that you know the bands exist, you're likely all too eager to start your own video game rock band. For your sake, we got to chat with John DeCampos a member of [Explosion Sound] (yes it's in brackets), a Baltimore-based video game rock band performing at this year's Bit Gen Gamer Fest, which holds its ninth gathering Saturday at Rams Head Live (for more information, go to bitgen.magfest.org .)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | October 17, 2002
Mad Catz cable keeps gamers linked to multiple consoles With major video game console makers dropping their prices this year, quite a few gamers have bought more than one machine. But every time you want to switch among your Microsoft Xbox, Sony PlayStation 2 or Nintendo GameCube, you have to turn off your television and console, pull the TV away from the wall, switch the wires, then turn everything back on again. Mad Catz Universal S-Video/Audio Cable ($10) gives gamers with a penchant for collecting video game consoles a great way to switch among gaming platforms without the hassle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | August 1, 2002
Console gamers can spend upward of $500 on a sound system to hear every high and low offered by Halo. But what if you want to blow your extra cash on other peripherals like controllers or games rather than on a top-of-the-line sound system? Interact Accessories has the answer for you: the DSS-900 5.1 Speaker System -- Gaming Series. Its list price is $150 (though an Internet search will turn up vendors selling it for $100). We tried the DSS-900 on the Xbox, PC and PlayStation2 and discovered that while it won't produce the sound a $500 system will, you won't be disappointed.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington | June 20, 2002
Dragging a 27-inch-screen television everywhere you want to take your Sony PlayStation 2 seems impractical to all but the most dedicated gamers. So it wasn't going to take long for someone to come up with small, portable standalone screens for video game consoles. Interact's Mobile Monitor for PS2 ($149) makes a great companion for just about any audio-visual device without a screen that can be plugged in with simple A/V cables. It will work with VCRs, DVD and VCD players as well as Nintendo 64, Sega Dreamcast, PlayStation's systems, Nintendo GameCube and Microsoft's Xbox.
NEWS
By SUSAN CARPENTER and SUSAN CARPENTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 20, 2005
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Johnathan Wendel is in training. Eight hours a day, seven days a week, he sits in his basement, gunning down opponents in the video game Painkiller. About the only time he leaves his house is for a daily three-mile run. Then it's back to the basement for round after bloody round of the first-person shooter game in which the player becomes the gunman. Wendel, or Fatal1ty as he is known in the competitive gaming world, is a professional cybersportsman known for his skillful aim. At the Cyberathlete Professional League's World Tour Grand Finals, kicking off in New York today, he hopes to take the $150,000 first prize, adding to the $86,000 he has already earned competing in live tournaments this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victor Godinez and Victor Godinez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 18, 2003
There's an idea that's been floating around in game magazines and Web sites recently that gamers aren't interested in supporting innovative games. Everybody complains that mediocre roadkill such as Enter the Matrix sells 4 million copies, but quirky titles such as Rez can't break 100,000 in sales. Now, I'll grant that the public ignores a lot of good games, but whose fault is that? In the current issue of Electronic Gaming Monthly, the editors complain about the lackluster fate of games like Rez and lecture readers not to buy into all the hype when a publisher trots out its latest big budget sequel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SHARON NOGUCHI and SHARON NOGUCHI,MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | August 24, 2006
SAN JOSE, Calif. Like many teenage boys, Sam Suyeyasu spends three to five hours a day blasting virtual enemies into oblivion with his Xbox. But at least one thing makes Suyeyasu very different: He's getting paid. Under the moniker of "Samurai," Suyeyasu and his gaming team, XiT Woundz, travel around the country and compete for cash prizes. Throw in the $50 an hour fans pay him for private lessons, and he expects he'll clear $25,000 this year from gaming. Not bad for a 19-year-old Californian who just earned his high-school equivalency diploma last year.
NEWS
By Ian Kirksey | August 15, 2013
When I was in high school, I had a friend over who happened to share an interest in video games. We were both engaged in a particularly rough game of "Dead or Alive," a fighting game. My mother walked in on us and commented on how we were glued to the screen and how when she was growing up, she thought that video games were just a fad. Man was she wrong. Today the video game industry is a multibillion dollar industry that is second only to cinema in terms of appeal and could very well surpass it in the next decade, according to DFC Intelligence, a strategic market research and consulting firm focused on interactive entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2013
Video games are a childhood staple. And, to many, the virtual pull of the fantasy worlds never loses its power. For John DeCampos, the sountracks of his childhood games have continued to stick with him. "[Video games] are an all encompassing piece of entertainment," said DeCampos, 30, who works in member services at EPS Industry Alliance. "It's moving art, music and story. Video games have everything. " In 2005, when the video game music scene was sparsely populated, DeCampos and a friend started a band, Entertainment System, with the aim to tackle classic video game music, but with a metal rock bent.
BUSINESS
Patrick Maynard and Dana Amihere and The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
Check back on this slug frequently for updated details about the Xbox release. Microsoft today showcased details of its next-generation gaming platform, Xbox One, which will succeed the Xbox 360. The announcement at Microsoft's Redmond campus followed significant speculation about the new device, which is expected to include a built-in version of the formerly detached Kinect module. Don Mattrick, president of the interactive entertainment business, debuted the box at 1 p.m. EST Tuesday, with the Microsoft team showing off a "hub"-style device that relies heavily on voice commands and gestures for control.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
For at least a generation of pop-culture consumers, the soundtrack of their lives has included themes from the likes of Mega Man and Super Mario. As they've grown up, the music of video games has branched out - to solo piano, to rock concerts and to symphonic performances. Among the developments is the University of Maryland's Gamer Symphony Orchestra, whose 100-plus members will take to the stage at College Park's Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center on Saturday, May 4. "The quality of video-game music has grown exponentially over the years," says Joel Guttman, president-elect of the group, which specializes in arranging and performing pieces taken from the background music on video games such as Halo, Sonic the Hedgehog and Final Fantasy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | August 14, 2012
This year has already been a watershed event for games in many respects, but for the most part we have now settled into the post-E3 dog days. For many gamers, this is a great time to reboot and actually get outside for a change, because as far as the release calendar goes, we are in the eye before the storm. Even with titles like "BioShock: Infinite" and "Grand Theft Auto V" shelved until 2013, there are still quite a few gems yet to be released in 2012. "Borderlands 2" Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | July 23, 2012
Electronic Arts has reached preliminary settlement with the consumer protection law firm Hagens Berman, who filed suit against the company for violating antitrust and consumer protection laws in making its popular football video games. The settlement has not been approved by U.S District Court, but if it is confirmed as it stands, a $27 million fund would be set up to pay out purchasers of EA's football games since 2005. According to a press release by Hagens Berman, the suit was originally filed in 2008.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2004
In the beginning, the Internet was seen as the Great Isolater for video gamers. While online, they could battle foes as far away as Japan for weeks without ever leaving their homes. Gaming addicts holed up in their rooms for days at a time, never setting foot outside (except maybe to tip the pizza delivery guy). It was a very lonely time. But as the Internet matures, video gaming is going outdoors - in the form of computer Local Area Network (LAN) and video console parties. Gamers are forming clubs and renting out bars and firehouses in Maryland to throw these bashes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Crayton Harrison and Crayton Harrison,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 11, 2002
Jim Austin wanted something sporty, something that would turn heads and handle his speed-demon demands. After months of study and deliberation, Austin, 43, became the proud owner of a Voodoo Egad, an intimidating machine with a window displaying its Ferrari-red interior and neon lighting. Friends visit his Wylie, Texas, home just to gawk at the $5,500 computer system. "There's nothing wrong with having a high-end Dell or a high-end Gateway, but nobody's going to come over to your house and want to see it," Austin said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | July 2, 2012
This past weekend, nature reminded us who is really in charge of this spherical rock. As heavy storms blasted the eastern seaboard, hundreds of thousands were left without power for days on end. As of this morning many still do not have command of their electricity. Inevitably, a lot of those folks are gamers. As our options for technological entertainment have increased, so has our reliance on their existence. Ironically, as power outages have become more bearable due to laptops, smartphones, handheld systems, tablets and eReaders, our frustration with blackouts seems to have skyrocketed.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
There's the Hall of Fame plaque, the World Series ring and the hardware he won for Rookie of the Year, Most Valuable Player (twice) and countless other accomplishments. Sometimes, Cal Ripken Jr. looks at that stuff and wonders: Is it really mine? "The farther removed [from playing] that I get, the more it all seems like another lifetime. But I'm pretty sure it all happened to me," said Ripken, 51, who spent 21 seasons with the Orioles before retiring in 2001. "When you're not playing baseball, day to day, in many ways your career is like looking back on a dream.
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