Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGame Theory
IN THE NEWS

Game Theory

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By LAURA SMITHERMAN AND PAUL ADAMS and LAURA SMITHERMAN AND PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTERS | October 11, 2005
The most widely used exercise in game theory, the field that drew the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences this year, has nothing to do with economics. It's called the "prisoner's dilemma" and examines the choices of two criminals to stay mum or confess and implicate their cohort. The dilemma is a favorite teaching tool of Thomas C. Schelling, a professor at the University of Maryland who won the Nobel yesterday. The prize committee bestowed the honor on Schelling and Israeli-American Robert J. Aumann for their research on game theory.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By TODD RICHISSIN and TODD RICHISSIN,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | December 11, 2005
STOCKHOLM, Sweden -- Forty-five years after publishing what became a textbook of sorts on how the United States and the Soviet Union could avert nuclear war, Thomas C. Schelling, professor emeritus at the University of Maryland, was formally awarded the 2005 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences yesterday. Schelling, 84, accepted his award from King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden and bowed to an elegantly dressed audience of about 1,600 people, who, by custom, stood and applauded his achievement and those of 10 other men awarded 2005 Nobel prizes in five categories.
Advertisement
NEWS
By ERIC SIEGEL and ERIC SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | October 11, 2005
College Park -- Thomas C. Schelling, professor emeritus at the University of Maryland, was awarded the Nobel Prize in economics yesterday for his lifelong work in using a branch of mathematics known as game theory to analyze human behavior in areas ranging from nuclear deterrence to racial segregation. Schelling - who joined the faculty in College Park in 1990 and retired from teaching two years ago - shared the $1.3 million prize with Robert J. Aumann, a mathematician at Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | October 12, 2005
A decade ago, Best Buy, a then-regional electronics chain based in Minneapolis, threw all the chips on the table. As the underdog in a fight against Circuit City, Best Buy announced it would build stores in virtually every major U.S. market, including Baltimore-Washington, whatever the cost. Best Buy borrowed hundreds of millions of dollars, overpaid for real estate, cut prices to the marrow and by early 1997 had seen its stock price fall by half. Crazy? Not if you consider work by Thomas C. Schelling, the University of Maryland emeritus professor who was announced Monday as a co-recipient of the Nobel prize in economics.
NEWS
By RICHARD O'MARA | October 16, 1994
Whoever it was who said it doesn't matter if you win or lose but how you play the game, missed the point. It matters very much.According to game theory, it's how you play the game that usually determines whether you win or lose.You don't make a move in chess without first trying to figure out how your opponent will react to it.Game theory assumes that all human interactions, personal, institutional, economic, can be understood and navigated by presumptions similar to those of the chess player.
NEWS
August 28, 2002
The student: Kriti Gandhi, 13 School: Burleigh Manor Middle Special achievement: Kriti placed second in the Stein Roe Young Investor Essay Contest, sponsored by Stein Roe Mutual Funds. She wrote an essay on what she had learned about money and investing. Her essay was selected from more than 1,250 submitted by seventh- and eighth-graders nationwide. What she said in the essay: "Basically, I said that you should learn about it from early on in life and that you should start early, you should diversify and you should invest maybe in a mutual fund if you don't know much," Kriti said.
NEWS
August 14, 2000
John C. Harsanyi, 80, winner of the 1994 Nobel Prize in economics for his work in the field of game theory, died Wednesday of a heart attack in Berkeley, Calif. He was considered an innovator in the field of game theory, a mathematical theory of human behavior in competitive situations. Game theory is used to analyze real-life conflicts in business, management and international relations. Thomas Foran, 76, the chief prosecutor in the "Chicago Seven" anti-Vietnam War conspiracy case, died of cancer Aug. 6 in Lake Forest, Ill. He was U.S. attorney in Chicago during the trial of the seven Vietnam War protest leaders charged with conspiring to start a riot during the 1968 Democratic National Convention.
NEWS
By TODD RICHISSIN and TODD RICHISSIN,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | December 11, 2005
STOCKHOLM, Sweden -- Forty-five years after publishing what became a textbook of sorts on how the United States and the Soviet Union could avert nuclear war, Thomas C. Schelling, professor emeritus at the University of Maryland, was formally awarded the 2005 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences yesterday. Schelling, 84, accepted his award from King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden and bowed to an elegantly dressed audience of about 1,600 people, who, by custom, stood and applauded his achievement and those of 10 other men awarded 2005 Nobel prizes in five categories.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | October 12, 2005
A decade ago, Best Buy, a then-regional electronics chain based in Minneapolis, threw all the chips on the table. As the underdog in a fight against Circuit City, Best Buy announced it would build stores in virtually every major U.S. market, including Baltimore-Washington, whatever the cost. Best Buy borrowed hundreds of millions of dollars, overpaid for real estate, cut prices to the marrow and by early 1997 had seen its stock price fall by half. Crazy? Not if you consider work by Thomas C. Schelling, the University of Maryland emeritus professor who was announced Monday as a co-recipient of the Nobel prize in economics.
NEWS
April 26, 2004
Frances Rafferty, 81, a pouty glamour girl in B movies of the 1940s and television shows of the 1950s who is best remembered as Spring Byington's daughter in the long-running sitcom December Bride, died April 18 in Paso Robles, Calif. The actress largely retired from the large and small screens in 1961 after the brief run of a December Bride spinoff, Pete and Gladys, starring Harry Morgan. She continued to play occasional roles on such series as The Streets of San Francisco into the 1970s, but devoted much of her later years to raising quarter horses.
NEWS
By LAURA SMITHERMAN AND PAUL ADAMS and LAURA SMITHERMAN AND PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTERS | October 11, 2005
The most widely used exercise in game theory, the field that drew the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences this year, has nothing to do with economics. It's called the "prisoner's dilemma" and examines the choices of two criminals to stay mum or confess and implicate their cohort. The dilemma is a favorite teaching tool of Thomas C. Schelling, a professor at the University of Maryland who won the Nobel yesterday. The prize committee bestowed the honor on Schelling and Israeli-American Robert J. Aumann for their research on game theory.
NEWS
By ERIC SIEGEL and ERIC SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | October 11, 2005
College Park -- Thomas C. Schelling, professor emeritus at the University of Maryland, was awarded the Nobel Prize in economics yesterday for his lifelong work in using a branch of mathematics known as game theory to analyze human behavior in areas ranging from nuclear deterrence to racial segregation. Schelling - who joined the faculty in College Park in 1990 and retired from teaching two years ago - shared the $1.3 million prize with Robert J. Aumann, a mathematician at Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
NEWS
April 26, 2004
Frances Rafferty, 81, a pouty glamour girl in B movies of the 1940s and television shows of the 1950s who is best remembered as Spring Byington's daughter in the long-running sitcom December Bride, died April 18 in Paso Robles, Calif. The actress largely retired from the large and small screens in 1961 after the brief run of a December Bride spinoff, Pete and Gladys, starring Harry Morgan. She continued to play occasional roles on such series as The Streets of San Francisco into the 1970s, but devoted much of her later years to raising quarter horses.
NEWS
August 28, 2002
The student: Kriti Gandhi, 13 School: Burleigh Manor Middle Special achievement: Kriti placed second in the Stein Roe Young Investor Essay Contest, sponsored by Stein Roe Mutual Funds. She wrote an essay on what she had learned about money and investing. Her essay was selected from more than 1,250 submitted by seventh- and eighth-graders nationwide. What she said in the essay: "Basically, I said that you should learn about it from early on in life and that you should start early, you should diversify and you should invest maybe in a mutual fund if you don't know much," Kriti said.
NEWS
August 14, 2000
John C. Harsanyi, 80, winner of the 1994 Nobel Prize in economics for his work in the field of game theory, died Wednesday of a heart attack in Berkeley, Calif. He was considered an innovator in the field of game theory, a mathematical theory of human behavior in competitive situations. Game theory is used to analyze real-life conflicts in business, management and international relations. Thomas Foran, 76, the chief prosecutor in the "Chicago Seven" anti-Vietnam War conspiracy case, died of cancer Aug. 6 in Lake Forest, Ill. He was U.S. attorney in Chicago during the trial of the seven Vietnam War protest leaders charged with conspiring to start a riot during the 1968 Democratic National Convention.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kay Chubbuck and By Kay Chubbuck,Special to the Sun | February 20, 2000
"Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny," by Robert Wright. Pantheon Press. 544 pages. $27.50 pages. Already, Robert Wright has been inducted into the great Valhalla of evolutionary philosophy, with critics' hailing "Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny" as a classic on the order of Charles Darwin. "Nonzero," they say, will change our view of life. Its emphasis on the design of history and the destiny of man makes it potentially one of the most important books of our time. The book's appeal: its explanation of "cultural evolution," ranging from the warring chiefdoms of the past to the global economy of today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kay Chubbuck and By Kay Chubbuck,Special to the Sun | February 20, 2000
"Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny," by Robert Wright. Pantheon Press. 544 pages. $27.50 pages. Already, Robert Wright has been inducted into the great Valhalla of evolutionary philosophy, with critics' hailing "Nonzero: The Logic of Human Destiny" as a classic on the order of Charles Darwin. "Nonzero," they say, will change our view of life. Its emphasis on the design of history and the destiny of man makes it potentially one of the most important books of our time. The book's appeal: its explanation of "cultural evolution," ranging from the warring chiefdoms of the past to the global economy of today.
NEWS
By RICHARD O'MARA | October 16, 1994
Whoever it was who said it doesn't matter if you win or lose but how you play the game, missed the point. It matters very much.According to game theory, it's how you play the game that usually determines whether you win or lose.You don't make a move in chess without first trying to figure out how your opponent will react to it.Game theory assumes that all human interactions, personal, institutional, economic, can be understood and navigated by presumptions similar to those of the chess player.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.