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BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2011
Working out of a Highlandtown studio, Ben Walsh and his small team of video game developers recently created My Pet Rock, a family-friendly Facebook game. But, Walsh said, some day he might decide to design a video game for a more, er, mature audience — and he's heartened to know the Supreme Court now has his back. In a landmark case, the high court on Monday struck down a California law barring the sale or rental of violent video games to minors. The 7-2 decision gave video games the same First Amendment protections afforded books, plays and movies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | June 18, 2012
Electronic Arts is confident that “Star Wars: The Old Republic” is a massively multiplayer online game that people will be playing in a decade. As they told GamesIndustry International, EA is also considering variations on a free-to-play model, surely in part to the 400,000 player dropoff in subscribers the game has seen. MMOs are in a tricky spot. Their development certainly isn't stagnant, but what “EverQuest,” “World of Warcraft” and “The Old Republic” have done may just be the tip of the iceberg.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Heather Newman and Heather Newman,KNIGHT RIDDER TRIBUNE | August 28, 2003
Automakers have a new way to get customers in for a test drive: licensing products for some of the world's most popular video games. To complete a level in Lara Croft Tomb Raider: Angel of Darkness, released this summer, you have to drive a Jeep Rubicon through a series of obstacles. To complete the popular racing game Colin McRae Rally 3, you spend up to 40 hours behind the wheel of a stunningly lifelike Ford Focus. Ford Racing 2, expected for the holiday season, features models of Ford cars.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2012
About 100 employees of Big Huge Games, a Timonium-based maker of video games, lost their jobs this week as the studio and its Rhode Island-based parent company abruptly shut down because of financial problems. The 12-year-old company was one of the anchors of Baltimore County's well-established video game industry, which has grown steadily since the 1980s as the popularity of computer and console games has skyrocketed. Big Huge Games was owned by 38 Studios, a Providence, R.I.-based company founded by former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling in 2006.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rachel Osterman and Rachel Osterman,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 25, 2003
Like many in her generation, Leslie Lund likes nothing more than all-night video game sessions in which she builds armies, destroys villages and shapes the future of the world. But the 20-year-old is also part of a little-known subgroup - women gamers. The Entertainment Software Association found that 26 percent of video game users are women over the age of 18, confirming what many "game girl" advocates have long argued: women love video games. At the same time, they say, game makers haven't acknowledged that players aren't just young or teen-age boys who want to shoot, terminate, and conquer their way to virtual victory while using female characters with unrealistic curves and tight clothes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | June 18, 2012
Electronic Arts is confident that “Star Wars: The Old Republic” is a massively multiplayer online game that people will be playing in a decade. As they told GamesIndustry International, EA is also considering variations on a free-to-play model, surely in part to the 400,000 player dropoff in subscribers the game has seen. MMOs are in a tricky spot. Their development certainly isn't stagnant, but what “EverQuest,” “World of Warcraft” and “The Old Republic” have done may just be the tip of the iceberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2011
To anyone who's ever watched Michael Phelps ' legendary dolphin kick, his picture-perfect dives or his power strokes and thought, "I can do better," soon you'll be able to give it a go — without even getting wet. The first details emerged Wednesday of a video game, two years in the making, called " Michael Phelps — Push the Limit. " The sports simulation game for Xbox 360, what looks to be the first action game involving swimming, promises to give players a realistic sense of what it takes to be an elite swimmer, if not beat one. "It brings alive what it's like to be someone like Michael Phelps , swimming at the absolute most competitive point in the swimming world," said Peter Matiss, vice president of marketing at 505 Games, the small Los Angeles-based company that's publishing it. "In the best moments, you really feel like you're in the game.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | August 7, 1994
Paul Barker is a turncoat.The 37-year-old geography teacher from England is in Maryland on his vacation commanding the American forces in the Revolutionary War against the British. Mr. Barker, a thin chap with a trim mustache, relished his traitorous role during a match yesterday in the "AvalonCon World Boardgaming Championships" at the Marriott Hunt Valley Inn.The championships, which started Wednesday and end today, are a promotion for the Avalon Hill Game Co. of Baltimore, maker of strategic board games.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2012
About 100 employees of Big Huge Games, a Timonium-based maker of video games, lost their jobs this week as the studio and its Rhode Island-based parent company abruptly shut down because of financial problems. The 12-year-old company was one of the anchors of Baltimore County's well-established video game industry, which has grown steadily since the 1980s as the popularity of computer and console games has skyrocketed. Big Huge Games was owned by 38 Studios, a Providence, R.I.-based company founded by former Boston Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling in 2006.
FEATURES
By Dallas Morning News | September 26, 1990
The kids are finally in bed. Sound asleep. Time to slip that Game Boy or that Nintendo controller out of those weary little hands. Time to play.For years, adults hooked on video games have had to resort to subterfuge, sneaking behind their children's backs to snatch a few hours of stolen pleasure on a borrowed Game Boy or Nintendo or Atari Lynx. Those who don't have children have had to buy their own video games, skulking around the aisles at Toys "R" Us among the bicycles and the Barbie Dolls.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2011
Working out of a Highlandtown studio, Ben Walsh and his small team of video game developers recently created My Pet Rock, a family-friendly Facebook game. But, Walsh said, some day he might decide to design a video game for a more, er, mature audience — and he's heartened to know the Supreme Court now has his back. In a landmark case, the high court on Monday struck down a California law barring the sale or rental of violent video games to minors. The 7-2 decision gave video games the same First Amendment protections afforded books, plays and movies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2011
To anyone who's ever watched Michael Phelps ' legendary dolphin kick, his picture-perfect dives or his power strokes and thought, "I can do better," soon you'll be able to give it a go — without even getting wet. The first details emerged Wednesday of a video game, two years in the making, called " Michael Phelps — Push the Limit. " The sports simulation game for Xbox 360, what looks to be the first action game involving swimming, promises to give players a realistic sense of what it takes to be an elite swimmer, if not beat one. "It brings alive what it's like to be someone like Michael Phelps , swimming at the absolute most competitive point in the swimming world," said Peter Matiss, vice president of marketing at 505 Games, the small Los Angeles-based company that's publishing it. "In the best moments, you really feel like you're in the game.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | August 3, 2009
Spurred by the success of Nintendo's "Wii Fit," video games are suddenly more and more about fitness. The "Wii Fit," a video game that acts as a virtual exercise coach, guides players through yoga moves, basic strength training and aerobics. Since it was released in the U.S. about a year ago, "Wii Fit" has sold more than 6 million copies. Nintendo's success has attracted the attention of not only its competitors (a slew of next-generation fitness-themed games such as "EA Sports Active" are on store shelves or will be by Christmas)
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 18, 2007
SANTA MONICA, Calif. -- In the competition among the makers of video game consoles, momentum is building for the Wii from Nintendo among its crucial allies: game developers and publishers. Inspired by the early success of the Wii, companies that create and distribute games are beginning to shift resources and personnel toward building more Wii games, in some cases at the expense of the competing systems: the PlayStation 3 from Sony Corp. and Xbox 360 from Microsoft Corp. The shift is closely watched because consumers tend to favor systems that have many compelling games.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz | August 4, 2005
SINCE THE DAWN of personal computers, Easter eggs have had a special place in the hearts and minds of software writers and their dedicated fans. But some old-timers are wondering, wistfully, if the days of Easter eggs are numbered - thanks to congressional investigations, the Federal Trade Commission and pressure from parents and religious groups who think a dollop of sex is more insidious than an entire game full of senseless violence. An Easter egg is a little surprise that programmers embed deep in their code, waiting for someone to type an arcane sequence of commands or push the right combination of joystick buttons.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | May 9, 2004
WE'VE HAD some credibility issues here in the media factory lately, so I hesitated to write this column. I mean, who would believe it? A corporation that values its workers? A CEO who thinks happy, well-compensated employees are good for the bottom line? Great salaries? Good health insurance? Profit-sharing? Employees who love their jobs? And their company? Come on, Jay, you'll say. Sensational lies didn't work for USA Today's Jack Kelley, and they won't work for you. Stop titillating the readers with tall tales.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | July 18, 2007
SANTA MONICA, Calif. -- In the competition among the makers of video game consoles, momentum is building for the Wii from Nintendo among its crucial allies: game developers and publishers. Inspired by the early success of the Wii, companies that create and distribute games are beginning to shift resources and personnel toward building more Wii games, in some cases at the expense of the competing systems: the PlayStation 3 from Sony Corp. and Xbox 360 from Microsoft Corp. The shift is closely watched because consumers tend to favor systems that have many compelling games.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1995
Spectrum Holobyte Inc., which has been swamped with red ink since buying Hunt Valley-based MicroProse Inc. in 1993, cut its work force by more than 60 workers, or 15 percent, company officials said yesterday.The Alameda, Calif.-based computer game maker said it cut its staff to below 400 workers and slashed the number of games it plans to produce this year from 50 to 29 in an effort to reduce its costs and improve its chances of turning a profit this year.Richard Gelhaus, the company's senior vice president for finance, said every Spectrum office and division was affected by the layoffs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rachel Osterman and Rachel Osterman,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 25, 2003
Like many in her generation, Leslie Lund likes nothing more than all-night video game sessions in which she builds armies, destroys villages and shapes the future of the world. But the 20-year-old is also part of a little-known subgroup - women gamers. The Entertainment Software Association found that 26 percent of video game users are women over the age of 18, confirming what many "game girl" advocates have long argued: women love video games. At the same time, they say, game makers haven't acknowledged that players aren't just young or teen-age boys who want to shoot, terminate, and conquer their way to virtual victory while using female characters with unrealistic curves and tight clothes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Heather Newman and Heather Newman,KNIGHT RIDDER TRIBUNE | August 28, 2003
Automakers have a new way to get customers in for a test drive: licensing products for some of the world's most popular video games. To complete a level in Lara Croft Tomb Raider: Angel of Darkness, released this summer, you have to drive a Jeep Rubicon through a series of obstacles. To complete the popular racing game Colin McRae Rally 3, you spend up to 40 hours behind the wheel of a stunningly lifelike Ford Focus. Ford Racing 2, expected for the holiday season, features models of Ford cars.
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