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By Alex Pham and Alex Pham,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 21, 2004
Carnations and lilies were the final indignity. The bouquet, which arrived at her door on a sunny Saturday in September, were from her fiance, a video game programmer who was working his eighth consecutive 72-hour week. Far from being flattered, the woman poured out her anger and frustration in a 2,000-word essay that she posted on the Internet under the pseudonym "ea_spouse." "The love of my life comes home late at night complaining of a headache that will not go away and a chronically upset stomach," she wrote.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Cassidy Sterling | March 11, 2014
Joel Haddock and Chris Klimas regularly have, what they call, a "date night. " No dinner. No movie. Nothing like that. To them, "date night" is working on a personal project - Twofold Secret, an independent gaming studio the two founded in 2010. It consists of huddling at the kitchen table at one of their homes, hammering out issues and planning a week-by-week game plan for whatever project they're working on. The co-founders met as undergraduates at Washington College in Chestertown when the two were neighbors in their college dorm, and discovered they both had an interest in games.
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FEATURES
By P.J. Huffstutter and P.J. Huffstutter,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 2, 1999
SAN RAFAEL, Calif. -- Jack Sorensen's phone rings. It's another call for help.A movie studio executive is trying to persuade Sorensen's software developers at LucasArts Entertainment Co. to create a computer game based on his upcoming film. Another pitch. Another "sure hit." And like scores of calls before, the LucasArts president will reject it."Studios are begging everyone I know to do projects. And we won't because we don't have to," Sorensen said. "I remember these same executives, just a few years ago, laughing at the idea of games being as big as movies.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
The three players bidding to build a new casino in Prince George's County have shown their hands, and the state will pick a winner by the end of December. The stakes are high as the state prepares to hold a series of meetings beginning this week and culminating Dec. 20 to choose who gets to operate the state's closest casino to Washington. All three pitched casino resorts costing hundreds of millions of dollars to be built near where Interstate 95 crosses into Maryland. The decision will be made by a special casino site-selection body, known as the Video Lottery Facility Location Commission, based on what it deems best for the state.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
Zynga, the video game maker best known for FarmVille and Words With Friends, has closed its Timonium office as part of a broader corporate consolidation, company officials said Monday. The company also made changes at three other offices, closing and consolidating some in Texas and New York. The company did not say how many jobs were being cut, but said that the moves affected about 1 percent of its work force of more than 3,000. About half of those in the Timonium office were relocated.
FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2004
Maybe it was the crinkly feel of that first multicolored Monopoly wad, but somehow Dominic Crapuchettes always knew that he would make his fortune in board games. For now, though, he deals in clay dough. That's the currency of Cluzzle, the clay-sculpting party game that Crapuchettes invented in 2003, and subsequently sank his life savings into. The 35-year-old Greenbelt resident is one of dozens of area game designers trying to break into the $1 billion board game industry with self-published wares this Christmas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | April 13, 2012
News Roundup •••• It was a busy week down in Bethesda, with the “Skyrim” developers trademarking the game's signature “Fus Ro Dah” shout. Crap, now I owe them $17. More pertient to gamers is the announcement that over 200 voice commands will be added via a free Kinect support download for Xbox 360 users later this month. [ PC Ga mer , PC Mag ] •••• ... but the National Academy of Video Game Testers and Reviews says “Minecraft” is better.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | August 1, 2012
With each passing day, we live in a more and more disposable society. Be it food, jobs, relationships, or even sadly, horrific tragedies which deflate our national spirit. If we want to be honest in this disposable society we now all inhabit, then we will admit that the movie theater shooting in Aurora, Colo., and the unimaginable and unbearable grief it produced for the victims and families is already fading from our collective conscious. Both because that is how our short-attention-span minds have been programmed to operate and because for much of the media, it's yesterday's news.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rasheim Freeman and Rasheim Freeman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 26, 2004
Video game violence has been an issue since the game Death Race was introduced during the 1970s. Today's titles like Rockstar Games' Manhunt include scenes of victims being stabbed with shards of glass. Marvel Studio's upcoming game The Punisher is based on the comic book vigilante character who interrogates his victims by slamming their heads against a curb. The Punisher and Manhunt represent an increasingly violent subset of games that are intended for mature gamers over age 18 but that frequently end up in the hands of minors, according to consumer advocates who say the industry should do more to police itself.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2003
CRUISING down Pratt Street in Baltimore along an eerily empty Inner Harbor, Ed Fletcher suddenly yanked his Humvee to the right and barreled into the lobby of the 40-story Legg Mason Inc. building - just in the nick of time as an oncoming dune buggy fired a barrage of bullets at him. Fortunately for everyone, the ensuing gun battle and anarchy weren't real. It was just Trex, a video game Fletcher helped design for his employer, BreakAway Games in Hunt Valley. But Trex isn't aspiring to be the next big hit among gamers eager to shoot up a virtual city.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
Zynga, the video game maker best known for FarmVille and Words With Friends, has closed its Timonium office as part of a broader corporate consolidation, company officials said Monday. The company also made changes at three other offices, closing and consolidating some in Texas and New York. The company did not say how many jobs were being cut, but said that the moves affected about 1 percent of its work force of more than 3,000. About half of those in the Timonium office were relocated.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
Deb Tillett has been around the world, pursuing a career in technology that started a few decades ago in the suburbs of Baltimore. She learned the ropes of the video game world while working at one of the local companies - MicroProse - that gave birth to an industry that's now thriving in Hunt Valley and other parts of Baltimore County and Maryland. Earlier this year, she took over the helm at the Emerging Technology Center, Baltimore's main technology business incubator, after that organization's longtime head, Ann Lansinger, retired.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | August 1, 2012
With each passing day, we live in a more and more disposable society. Be it food, jobs, relationships, or even sadly, horrific tragedies which deflate our national spirit. If we want to be honest in this disposable society we now all inhabit, then we will admit that the movie theater shooting in Aurora, Colo., and the unimaginable and unbearable grief it produced for the victims and families is already fading from our collective conscious. Both because that is how our short-attention-span minds have been programmed to operate and because for much of the media, it's yesterday's news.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | July 25, 2012
Aspiring game designers have just been handed the motherlode of thought and wisdom with the Critical Path project, a series of short interviews from virtually every big name in gaming. Freely hosted online, the elegantly designed interface allows video game fans to sort through clips by tagged topics or interview subject to experience what ultimately amounts to a few hours of footage in a sort of hive mind around the state of gaming and design. At launch, the site hosts 121 clips ranging in length from 30 seconds to two minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | July 13, 2012
"The future belongs to crowds. "  - Don DeLillo, Mao II If the 20th century version of video game marketing is attempting to observe what customers wanted, than the 21st has become a time about flat-out asking them. Steam, Valve's online gaming store and community hub, announced "Greenlight," a crowdsourcing-inspired move aimed at letting the users have more say in what games are available to buy and play on the service. "The community should be deciding what gets released," Valve announced.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | April 13, 2012
News Roundup •••• It was a busy week down in Bethesda, with the “Skyrim” developers trademarking the game's signature “Fus Ro Dah” shout. Crap, now I owe them $17. More pertient to gamers is the announcement that over 200 voice commands will be added via a free Kinect support download for Xbox 360 users later this month. [ PC Ga mer , PC Mag ] •••• ... but the National Academy of Video Game Testers and Reviews says “Minecraft” is better.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
A veteran video game industry executive in Maryland who has run her own international consulting business will become the new leader of Baltimore's main technology incubator next month. Deborah Tillett, who worked for Hunt Valley's BreakAway Ltd. and Microprose, among other technology companies, has been picked to run the city's Emerging Technology Center, she confirmed Tuesday by phone. The ETC is a technology startup incubator that has helped launch Baltimore companies since the late 1990s.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2010
When Sid Meier and a partner launched the video game design firm MicroProse in the early 1980s, the industry was still in its infancy. Today, Meier is widely regarded as the "godfather" of computer gaming. Based in Hunt Valley, MicroProse grew over the years to become a beacon to computer geeks who wanted to be part of the growing market of video games on personal computers. More than two decades later, Meier, 56, is still designing video games — his most famous is Civilization, a virtual empire-building game — for another company he helped found, Firaxis Games, in Hunt Valley.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
A veteran video game industry executive in Maryland who has run her own international consulting business will become the new leader of Baltimore's main technology incubator next month. Deborah Tillett, who worked for Hunt Valley's BreakAway Ltd. and Microprose, among other technology companies, has been picked to run the city's Emerging Technology Center, she confirmed Tuesday by phone. The ETC is a technology startup incubator that has helped launch Baltimore companies since the late 1990s.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2010
When Sid Meier and a partner launched the video game design firm MicroProse in the early 1980s, the industry was still in its infancy. Today, Meier is widely regarded as the "godfather" of computer gaming. Based in Hunt Valley, MicroProse grew over the years to become a beacon to computer geeks who wanted to be part of the growing market of video games on personal computers. More than two decades later, Meier, 56, is still designing video games — his most famous is Civilization, a virtual empire-building game — for another company he helped found, Firaxis Games, in Hunt Valley.
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