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By Cassidy Sterling | March 11, 2014
Joel Haddock and Chris Klimas regularly have, what they call, a "date night. " No dinner. No movie. Nothing like that. To them, "date night" is working on a personal project - Twofold Secret, an independent gaming studio the two founded in 2010. It consists of huddling at the kitchen table at one of their homes, hammering out issues and planning a week-by-week game plan for whatever project they're working on. The co-founders met as undergraduates at Washington College in Chestertown when the two were neighbors in their college dorm, and discovered they both had an interest in games.
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BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Maryland is joining 33 other lotteries in a multistate association that will give players access to new games, including one being introduced in the fall that could award several million-dollar prizes at one time. Stephen Martino, director of the Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Agency, said that joining the Multi-State Lottery Association, a member-owned nonprofit, will mean that in late October, Marylanders will be able to play a new game called Monopoly Millionaires' Club, which has a top jackpot and also high-value second-tier prizes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | March 29, 2012
Ben Walsh doesn't have a lot of time to play games these days. As CEO and president of the Baltimore-based Pure Bang Games, Walsh spends his waking hours leading a team of nine developers aiming to release a new social game every few months.  The irony, of course, is that Walsh is a lifelong gamer who, if he ever took a vacation, "would sit down and do nothing but play" all the games he's been missing out on since starting Pure Bang in...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cassidy Sterling | March 11, 2014
Joel Haddock and Chris Klimas regularly have, what they call, a "date night. " No dinner. No movie. Nothing like that. To them, "date night" is working on a personal project - Twofold Secret, an independent gaming studio the two founded in 2010. It consists of huddling at the kitchen table at one of their homes, hammering out issues and planning a week-by-week game plan for whatever project they're working on. The co-founders met as undergraduates at Washington College in Chestertown when the two were neighbors in their college dorm, and discovered they both had an interest in games.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | April 20, 2008
Once upon a time, in the countryside west of Baltimore, a council of elders issued a challenge to a motley crew of apprentice conjurers. In just five weeks, they would have to master battle strategy, hand-to-hand combat and dragon-hunting. Learned well, these skills would help them best their adversaries in their quest for the ultimate treasure: A career developing video games. "This is a very competitive industry," Eric Jordan told the students gathered in a classroom at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | July 24, 2008
Here's what college student Paul Oliver can't do so well: Count backward or recite the alphabet in reverse, and he's not so good at getting the linear progression of things. He couldn't put a comic strip in order if its panels were mixed up, for example. That's what he found out from a psychological test pinpointing his learning disorders. Here's what he can do really well: Write computer game programs and get others excited about doing the same. At 24, Oliver's passion for gaming has grabbed the attention of Microsoft, which chose him to be among a handful of student partners in the Mid-Atlantic, and paid his way to a Seattle convention this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Hiawatha Bray and Hiawatha Bray,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 2, 2003
With its muscular 64-bit processor and high-velocity hard drive, the new Apple Power Mac G5 is among the most powerful desktop computers on earth. It's just what you'd want for playing a sophisticated 3-D adventure game. But if you buy game software from MonkeyByte.com of San Leandro, Calif., you're more likely to get a game that resembles something you played in a video arcade circa 1985. That's fine with Yon Hardisty, MonkeyByte's chief executive officer. "Maybe they're not as pretty as Quake and Age of Empires, [two classic PC games]
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Maryland is joining 33 other lotteries in a multistate association that will give players access to new games, including one being introduced in the fall that could award several million-dollar prizes at one time. Stephen Martino, director of the Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Agency, said that joining the Multi-State Lottery Association, a member-owned nonprofit, will mean that in late October, Marylanders will be able to play a new game called Monopoly Millionaires' Club, which has a top jackpot and also high-value second-tier prizes.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | March 2, 2010
Even a down economy presents opportunities. That's what executives at Game Trading Technologies Inc., a Hunt Valley-based startup, are counting on. The company has built a business model on buying and selling used video games and consoles, and revenue doubled to $36.7 million last year as recession-weary gamers hunted for deals. In a rare case of a Maryland company's going public in a tough market, Game Trading on Friday raised $3.9 million from investors - money it will use to expand.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
A Baltimore County video game developer agreed to pay $75,000 in a settlement after it was accused by an industry trade group of using illegal copies of commercial software products. The Business Software Alliance, which represents the commercial software industry, alleged that Hunt Valley-based BreakAway Ltd., which makes video games for entertainment and training for businesses and the military, and footwear company Aetrex Worldwide Inc. used unlicensed copies of Microsoft and Adobe software.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | March 29, 2012
Ben Walsh doesn't have a lot of time to play games these days. As CEO and president of the Baltimore-based Pure Bang Games, Walsh spends his waking hours leading a team of nine developers aiming to release a new social game every few months.  The irony, of course, is that Walsh is a lifelong gamer who, if he ever took a vacation, "would sit down and do nothing but play" all the games he's been missing out on since starting Pure Bang in...
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | March 2, 2010
Even a down economy presents opportunities. That's what executives at Game Trading Technologies Inc., a Hunt Valley-based startup, are counting on. The company has built a business model on buying and selling used video games and consoles, and revenue doubled to $36.7 million last year as recession-weary gamers hunted for deals. In a rare case of a Maryland company's going public in a tough market, Game Trading on Friday raised $3.9 million from investors - money it will use to expand.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes , gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
A Baltimore County video game developer agreed to pay $75,000 in a settlement after it was accused by an industry trade group of using illegal copies of commercial software products. The Business Software Alliance, which represents the commercial software industry, alleged that Hunt Valley-based BreakAway Ltd., which makes video games for entertainment and training for businesses and the military, and footwear company Aetrex Worldwide Inc. used unlicensed copies of Microsoft and Adobe software.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
A Baltimore County video game developer agreed to pay $75,000 in a settlement after it was accused by an industry trade group of using illegal copies of commercial software products. The Business Software Alliance, which represents the commercial software industry, alleged that Hunt Valley-based BreakAway Ltd., which makes video games for entertainment and training for businesses and the military, and footwear company Aetrex Worldwide Inc. used unlicensed copies of Microsoft and Adobe software.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
Zynga Inc., one of the largest developers of online games for social networks, said Tuesday that it will open its first East Coast office in the Baltimore region this year, and it will be led by an area veteran in the gaming industry. The office will have 12 to 15 employees this year and will work on an unspecified new social network game, the company said. Zynga East, the name of the new office, will also work on projects with the company's game developers in its San Francisco headquarters.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | July 24, 2008
Here's what college student Paul Oliver can't do so well: Count backward or recite the alphabet in reverse, and he's not so good at getting the linear progression of things. He couldn't put a comic strip in order if its panels were mixed up, for example. That's what he found out from a psychological test pinpointing his learning disorders. Here's what he can do really well: Write computer game programs and get others excited about doing the same. At 24, Oliver's passion for gaming has grabbed the attention of Microsoft, which chose him to be among a handful of student partners in the Mid-Atlantic, and paid his way to a Seattle convention this week.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
Zynga Inc., one of the largest developers of online games for social networks, said Tuesday that it will open its first East Coast office in the Baltimore region this year, and it will be led by an area veteran in the gaming industry. The office will have 12 to 15 employees this year and will work on an unspecified new social network game, the company said. Zynga East, the name of the new office, will also work on projects with the company's game developers in its San Francisco headquarters.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes , gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
A Baltimore County video game developer agreed to pay $75,000 in a settlement after it was accused by an industry trade group of using illegal copies of commercial software products. The Business Software Alliance, which represents the commercial software industry, alleged that Hunt Valley-based BreakAway Ltd., which makes video games for entertainment and training for businesses and the military, and footwear company Aetrex Worldwide Inc. used unlicensed copies of Microsoft and Adobe software.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | April 20, 2008
Once upon a time, in the countryside west of Baltimore, a council of elders issued a challenge to a motley crew of apprentice conjurers. In just five weeks, they would have to master battle strategy, hand-to-hand combat and dragon-hunting. Learned well, these skills would help them best their adversaries in their quest for the ultimate treasure: A career developing video games. "This is a very competitive industry," Eric Jordan told the students gathered in a classroom at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.
BUSINESS
By Alex Pham and Alex Pham,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 21, 2004
Carnations and lilies were the final indignity. The bouquet, which arrived at her door on a sunny Saturday in September, were from her fiance, a video game programmer who was working his eighth consecutive 72-hour week. Far from being flattered, the woman poured out her anger and frustration in a 2,000-word essay that she posted on the Internet under the pseudonym "ea_spouse." "The love of my life comes home late at night complaining of a headache that will not go away and a chronically upset stomach," she wrote.
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