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ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | July 25, 2012
Aspiring game designers have just been handed the motherlode of thought and wisdom with the Critical Path project, a series of short interviews from virtually every big name in gaming. Freely hosted online, the elegantly designed interface allows video game fans to sort through clips by tagged topics or interview subject to experience what ultimately amounts to a few hours of footage in a sort of hive mind around the state of gaming and design. At launch, the site hosts 121 clips ranging in length from 30 seconds to two minutes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2014
Did it seem like Patrick (Jonathan Groff) could experience anything more uncomfortable than last episode's failed hook-up with Richie? No? Well... "Looking At Your Browser History" gets off to a cringe-worthy start, with Patrick and work buddy Owen far more drunk at a work party than anyone should be. It's a shindig to commemorate the celebration of the video game Patrick has been designing, and it's held aboard an aircraft carrier. Which means tired material about seamen that probably would have been better left to that fleet week episode of "Sex and the City.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 24, 2005
NEW YORK --"So you have these four basic types that occupy the environment: the Achiever, the Explorer, the Socializer and the Killer." Nick Fortugno, 30, turned away from the board and faced his 14 undergraduate and master's-level students in his Thursday seminar. "Killers act like predators, and like any ecosystem, if you increase the number of killers and facilitate them, you decrease the number of achievers and socializers." A forestry class on the ecology of the African savanna? No. A psychology course on the ways of the grade-school playground?
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
At a forum on new ideas for the Howard County library system's technology-based HiTech initiative, a group of teen girls bristled at the thought of venturing into science, technology, engineering and math fields, seeing no correlation between science and their particular favorite pastime, fashion. Then Angela Brade, the system's chief operating officer for support services, reminded them that lip gloss and other such makeup is the product of chemical engineering. So, too, are the wrinkle-free garments they were wearing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | April 30, 2012
News Roundup •••• Some extremely juicy details about the exciting “God of War: Ascension” have surfaced, with some nuts and bolts of how the new multiplayer mode will function. Add this to your list of “reasons I own a PS3.” [ USA Today ] ••••  Evidence is pointing to the first bit of long-awaited “Skyrim” DLC being a) not far off and b) having something to do with Snow Elves and crossbows. Let's be honest, the “Skyrim” DLC could be anything and we'd all buy it sight unseen.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2010
When Sid Meier and a partner launched the video game design firm MicroProse in the early 1980s, the industry was still in its infancy. Today, Meier is widely regarded as the "godfather" of computer gaming. Based in Hunt Valley, MicroProse grew over the years to become a beacon to computer geeks who wanted to be part of the growing market of video games on personal computers. More than two decades later, Meier, 56, is still designing video games — his most famous is Civilization, a virtual empire-building game — for another company he helped found, Firaxis Games, in Hunt Valley.
NEWS
By Ian Kirksey | August 15, 2013
When I was in high school, I had a friend over who happened to share an interest in video games. We were both engaged in a particularly rough game of "Dead or Alive," a fighting game. My mother walked in on us and commented on how we were glued to the screen and how when she was growing up, she thought that video games were just a fad. Man was she wrong. Today the video game industry is a multibillion dollar industry that is second only to cinema in terms of appeal and could very well surpass it in the next decade, according to DFC Intelligence, a strategic market research and consulting firm focused on interactive entertainment.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
At a forum on new ideas for the Howard County library system's technology-based HiTech initiative, a group of teen girls bristled at the thought of venturing into science, technology, engineering and math fields, seeing no correlation between science and their particular favorite pastime, fashion. Then Angela Brade, the system's chief operating officer for support services, reminded them that lip gloss and other such makeup is the product of chemical engineering. So, too, are the wrinkle-free garments they were wearing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2014
Did it seem like Patrick (Jonathan Groff) could experience anything more uncomfortable than last episode's failed hook-up with Richie? No? Well... "Looking At Your Browser History" gets off to a cringe-worthy start, with Patrick and work buddy Owen far more drunk at a work party than anyone should be. It's a shindig to commemorate the celebration of the video game Patrick has been designing, and it's held aboard an aircraft carrier. Which means tired material about seamen that probably would have been better left to that fleet week episode of "Sex and the City.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | April 11, 2012
Greg Street took an unusual path to being one of the lead developers on the most massive video game in history. The McDaniel College graduate returns to his alma mater on April 30 in a free event open to the public called "SmartTALK," where Street will speak about how his liberal arts education prepared him for his current role as "World of Warcraft's" lead systems designer. We caught up with Greg to discuss his path to Blizzard and his role in engaging with the huge community of fans "World of Warcraft" has. Look out for Part 2 of our talk tomorrow.
NEWS
By Ian Kirksey | August 15, 2013
When I was in high school, I had a friend over who happened to share an interest in video games. We were both engaged in a particularly rough game of "Dead or Alive," a fighting game. My mother walked in on us and commented on how we were glued to the screen and how when she was growing up, she thought that video games were just a fad. Man was she wrong. Today the video game industry is a multibillion dollar industry that is second only to cinema in terms of appeal and could very well surpass it in the next decade, according to DFC Intelligence, a strategic market research and consulting firm focused on interactive entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | July 25, 2012
Aspiring game designers have just been handed the motherlode of thought and wisdom with the Critical Path project, a series of short interviews from virtually every big name in gaming. Freely hosted online, the elegantly designed interface allows video game fans to sort through clips by tagged topics or interview subject to experience what ultimately amounts to a few hours of footage in a sort of hive mind around the state of gaming and design. At launch, the site hosts 121 clips ranging in length from 30 seconds to two minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | April 30, 2012
News Roundup •••• Some extremely juicy details about the exciting “God of War: Ascension” have surfaced, with some nuts and bolts of how the new multiplayer mode will function. Add this to your list of “reasons I own a PS3.” [ USA Today ] ••••  Evidence is pointing to the first bit of long-awaited “Skyrim” DLC being a) not far off and b) having something to do with Snow Elves and crossbows. Let's be honest, the “Skyrim” DLC could be anything and we'd all buy it sight unseen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | April 11, 2012
Greg Street took an unusual path to being one of the lead developers on the most massive video game in history. The McDaniel College graduate returns to his alma mater on April 30 in a free event open to the public called "SmartTALK," where Street will speak about how his liberal arts education prepared him for his current role as "World of Warcraft's" lead systems designer. We caught up with Greg to discuss his path to Blizzard and his role in engaging with the huge community of fans "World of Warcraft" has. Look out for Part 2 of our talk tomorrow.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2010
The Parkville boy's parents had deemed him too young for "Tron" when it played in theaters in 1982. But he loved it when he saw it several years later on a neighbor's VHS tape. Soon, he wanted to join the new frontier of electronic bulletin boards. To post, he had to pick a moniker. "A lot of people chose aliases like Dark Knight or Thunder Hawk," he said recently. "I logged on for a week as Tron. " By the end of the week he realized there were seven or eight people in Baltimore alone using Tron.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2010
In Mafia Wars, you recruit your friends into a virtual world of organized crime. In FarmVille, you and your friends help each other tend virtual animals and plots of land. And in FrontierVille, you endeavor to build a frontier town in the Wild West. Welcome to the universe of online social games crafted by Zynga Game Network Inc. — a thriving San Francisco-based company that launched a major game design studio in Baltimore County last year. That office, known as Zynga East, was responsible in June for creating and launching FrontierVille, the company's second most popular game behind FarmVille, with nearly 35 million users.
BUSINESS
By Rory J. O'Connor and Rory J. O'Connor,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 15, 1991
SAN JOSE, Calif. -- Programmers are often thought of as the mavericks of the computer business, and in many respects that's true.But during the past 10 years, as personal computers have moved from hobbyist oddities to household appliances, the business of programming has changed. Development is more corporate, organized, driven by business plans and marketing white papers instead of the creative spark of a maverick's imagination.Except for computer games, that is.Software is usually written in modules by teams of programmers at companies with millions of dollars in annual revenues.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1998
There are magicians among us. But instead of rabbits or flowers, they conjure jet fighters, demons, pirates and the ghosts of Civil War generals.Sid Meier is first among them. The 44-year-old Hunt Valley computer programmer is a legend in the world of computer gamers, practicing his craft in a snake pit of electrical cords, humming computers, crumb-filled Pop Tarts boxes, and half-empty soda cans.Many gamers think his masterpiece, Sid Meier's Civilization, is the greatest simulation of all time.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2010
When Sid Meier and a partner launched the video game design firm MicroProse in the early 1980s, the industry was still in its infancy. Today, Meier is widely regarded as the "godfather" of computer gaming. Based in Hunt Valley, MicroProse grew over the years to become a beacon to computer geeks who wanted to be part of the growing market of video games on personal computers. More than two decades later, Meier, 56, is still designing video games — his most famous is Civilization, a virtual empire-building game — for another company he helped found, Firaxis Games, in Hunt Valley.
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